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LINCOLN 1988 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/townreport1988linc_0 



REPORT 
of the 

OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 
of the 

TOWN OF LINCOLN 
FOR THE YEAR 1988 




LINCOLN, MASSACHUSETTS 



Cover - Photographs by 
John Caswell 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page 



TOWN CALENDAR 
GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Board of Selectmen 1 

Officers and Committees 6 

Town Clerk 21 

FINANCE 

Town Treasurer 52 

Town Accountant 55 

Board of Assessors 64 

Collector of Taxes 67 

PROTECTION OF PERSONS AND PROPERTY 

Fire & Police Departments 69 

Civil Defense & Emergency Preparedness 73 

Public Safety Study Committee 75 

Inspectors of Building, Wiring & Plumbing 76 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 78 

HEALTH AND WELFARE 

Board of Health 79 

Council on Aging 84 

Minuteman Home Care 85 

Animal Control Officer 86 

North East Solid Waste Committee 87 

Recycling Committee 89 

PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 

Planning Board 92 

Board of Appeals 94 

Long Range Planning Committee 96 

Conservation Commission 97 

Traffic Management Committee 101 

Lincoln Land Conservation Trust 102 

Housing Commission 104 

Water Commissioners 107 

Public Works 110 

Land Bank Study Committee 111 

Bethany Study Committee 112 

Pierce Property Committee 114 

Cemetery Commissioners 116 

Celebrations Committee 117 



Historical Commission 119 

Historic District Commission 120 

Codman Community Farms 121 

Route 128 Area Committee 125 

Bemis Hall Advisory Committee 128 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 129 

Personnel Board 130 

LIBRARY, RECREATION AND SCHOOLS 

Lincoln Public Library 131 

DeCordova Museum & Park 136 

Lincoln Arts Council 147 

Recreation Committee 149 

Strats Place Committee 151 

Elementary School Committee 152 

Lincoln-Sudbury Regional School Committee 159 

Lincoln Scholarship Committee 173 
Lincoln-Sudbury Regional Scholarship Fund Committee 174 

Minuteman Regional Vocational Technical School 175 

STATISTICAL INFORMATION 

Vital Statistics 184 

Commissioners of Trust Funds 189 

Valuation List 204 



TOWN CALENDAR 



SELECTMEN 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

WATER COMMISSIONERS 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

PLANNING BOARD 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

HOUSING COMMISSION 

OTHER COMMITTEES 

POPULATION 
TOWN AREA 
1988-89 TAX RATE 
ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

ANNUAL ELECTION OF OFFICERS 

QUALIFICATIONS FOR 
REGISTRATION 

REGISTERED VOTERS 

TOWN OFFICES 



Every Monday evening, 7:30 pm 
Town Offices Building 259-8850 

Every other Monday evening, 8:00 pm 
Superintendant's Office 259-9400 

For appointments, call Town Offices 
Building, 259-8850 

First Tuesday evening of each month, 
8:00 pm Town Offices Building 

First Monday evening of each month, 
8:00 pm Town Offices Building 

Every other Wednesday evening, 
8:00 pm Town Offices Building 

First and third Wednesdays of each 
month, 7:30 pm Town Offices Bldg. 

Every other Monday evening, 8:30 pm 
Town Offices Building 

See bulletin board, Town Offices 
Building 

5,037 (Town Census) 
14.56 square miles 
$9.80 

Saturday before the last Monday in 
March falls on Easter Saturday 
Annual Town Meeting rescheduled for 
April 5, 1989 

Last Monday in March - March 27, 
1989 



Residence in Town of Lincoln 

3651 (As of November 1, 1988) 

Open Monday through Friday, 8:30 am 
to 4:30 pm (Closed Saturdays) 
Telephone 259-8850 (All departments) 



General Government 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Susan C. Fargo 
Warren F. Flint, Jr. 
John R. Caswell, Chairman 

1988 had to be the year of "Boston Properties," OR "Battle 
Road Farm," OR "The Minuteman Park Master Plan," OR "Hanscom Air 
Force Base Growth Plans," OR "Route 2 Upgrading," OR - there 
really were an awful lot of things that happened in 1988, 
weren't there? 

As the epoch of the year, the Selectmen look back on all 
the hours, the hearings, the tremendous outpouring of support by 
Townspeople over the Boston Properties proposal to widen Winter 
Street and Old County Road to accommodate the traffic from their 
undef initized, 1.1 million square foot, office park proposed for 
neighboring Waltham. Seeing 300 - 400 Lincolnites at every 
hearing on the matter before the Commissioners of Middlesex 
County, and finally to hear the Commissioners rule in favor of 
Lincoln provided a "high" that will be hard to top. The issue 
was also elevated to its proper position as one of regional 
planning, an achievement made possible by the support of the 
Massachusetts Water Resources Authority (MWRA), the City of 
Cambridge and its legislators, and the neighboring towns. 

Unfortunately, we must be forever watchful for the next 
shoe to drop. This is the second time in four years that we 
have argued with some success before the County Commissioners 
over the impact of developments next to us in Waltham. Such 
developments impact our roads, our finances, and our quality of 
life. It is the third time in four years that a non-voting, 
non-taxpaying, non-Lincoln developer has brought us before the 
County Commissioners over road and traffic matters. We have not 
heard the last of these matters which sorely tax our financial 
and volunteer resources, and we are truly in great debt to our 
Route 128 Committee, capably chaired by Beth Sutherland, which 
remains vigilant to new developments and who is ever willing to 
mobilize as necessary. 

On this same subject, we chose in 1988 to challenge Bay 
Colony, our original Winter Street adversary, in court over 
their plans for their third phase and parts of their ongoing 
phase two. As a result, we were able to negotiate a 15 year 
agreement in which Bay Colony will not use its legal access from 
Old County Road unless the nature of the whole area changes 
dramatically. We feel this agreement was a definite plus for 
the Town. 



1 



While all this was going on, our latest affordable housing 
project, Battle Road Farm, reminded us continually of the 
"Perils of Pauline." Delay after delay, mostly caused by 
elements beyond the control of the developer, Lincoln House 
Associates (LHA) or ourselves, finally ended on November 1st 
with the former McHugh parcel on Old Bedford Road being conveyed 
to LHA by the Town. By the end of the year, LHA's project was 
"in the ground" and Lincoln North, the neighboring and linked 
office park was able to proceed as well. We were pleased also 
that the Commonwealth gave the project substantial grants to 
help with some of the utilities and legal aspects of the 
af fordability issue. With Battle Road Farm now finally into 
construction, Lincoln is one of the very few cities and towns in 
the Commonwealth which has met the State's goal of ten percent 
affordable housing in Town. This achievement should mitigate 
against a developer's end-running our zoning bylaws through a 
comprehensive permit, as has happened in neighboring towns. The 
Town's unique success on the housing front was highlighted by a 
very favorable Boston Globe article in December, which triggered 
many inquiries from other towns as to "how we did it." Such 
favorable press helps greatly in dealing with other issues at 
the State level, such as the awarding of grants. 

The Hanscom Area Traffic Study Committee (HATS) was 
reconstituted in late 1987 just in time to deal with both 
Hanscom Air Force Base's new master plan for growth and the 
Minuteman National Historical Park's New Draft Master Plan. The 
Air Force is proposing to construct one million square feet of 
buildings, much of which will be for expansion and will 
certainly impact traffic in Town. The park will be trying to 
relocate Route 2A and restore the Battle Road to near its 1775 
condition. While the Selectmen favor relocating Route 2A, and, 
in fact, have endorsed the first step in this road relocation 
process in the construction of Lincoln North, they do not 
support the Park's taking residences against landowners' wishes 
in order to achieve the Park's goals. Both these matters will 
occupy the Selectmen and the Town in 1989 arid the following 
years. 

After over 20 years of effort, we are truly pleased to see 
the start of the "safety upgrades" on Route 2. With the 
widening of the eastern end of the Lincoln portion of the road 
almost done, we expect the center dividers to be in place in the 
early summer of 1989, and we also look forward to the beginning 
of the reconstruction of the Bedford Road intersection. We 
believe the State is now committed to making this stretch of 
roadway safer and that this work will also include Crosby's 
Corner. We must note with sadness, however, that a part-time 
Lincoln Special Police Officer, Harold Leary, was severely 
injured during the early phase of this work. 



2 



The Order of Saint Anne, an Episcopal Order of nuns who 
have been operating a home for retarded women since 1970 at 
Bethany, their property in Lincoln, decided to cease its 
operations and move from Town. Consequently, the Selectmen 
appointed a committee headed most ably by Elizabeth Downey, to 
see what might be worked out for the future of the property 
which lies between Route 2 and Sandy Pond Road. The committee 
recommends some affordable housing and 100 units of assisted 
living for the elderly, but so far we have not been able to come 
to any agreement with the Sisters. We hope that something can 
be arranged in the new year. While we are sympathetic to the 
Sisters' need to realize the equity from their property, we hope 
to ensure that the eventual use of the property is consistent 
with the needs and desires of the Town. 

One of the hardest nuts to crack in 1988 was our growing 
financial crisis, a situation experienced in municipalities 
throughout the State. The resultant 7 1/2 percent override 
agreed to by the voters in March to assure an acceptable level 
of services was a solution, of course, but it presages an 
override each year. We foresee no way that the Town can provide 
the services its people want, the education our now growing 
school population must have, and fund the uncontrollable costs 
of solid waste disposal, insurance, pension funds, and special 
education, without it. Federal aid has ceased. The State's 
financial picture is bad enough so that while we expect Local 
Aid from that quarter to continue, we do not expect it to 
increase, thus making us fall behind each year in that revenue 
source. Proposition 2 1/2 is laudable, but for us with a small, 
undiversif ied tax base, there is little we can do but override 
or drastically cut services. We are not alone, for many other 
communities are experiencing the same problem. Cutting services 
is of course a possibility but present operating budgets are, in 
our opinion, "barebones." The Selectmen do not believe the Town 
wants reduced fire and police protection, larger school 
classroom sizes, less attention paid to its infrastructure, or 
less responsiveness from the Town offices. Town departments 
have done extremely well to stay within the Finance Committee 
guidelines, basically level funding expenses and submitting 
increases for only the merit and union contract raises. 
However, because our tax levy base is low, we cannot meet even 
these needs without an override. 

This is especially troubling, for overrides mean higher 
taxes, and many of our fixed income citizens as well as many of 
our wage earners cannot afford the large increases entailed. 
The problem is going to be with us for many years, and the Town 
will seriously have to consider previously unacceptable means of 
drastically increasing our tax base, developing alternative 
sources of revenue through legislative action, or face Lincoln 
becoming truly a Town for only the wealthy. 



3 



While not a financial problem, a disturbing aspect of this 
affluence that is beginning to appear is the destruction of 
older, smaller homes for replacement with much larger units on 
the same two acre lot. It is hard enough to get affordable 
housing into Town, but if what we have disappears at the same 
time, we really are trying to row upstream without a paddle. 
The Town must address itself to this issue in the near future. 

One action the Town took towards improving its fiscal 
condition was, with Town Meeting approval, to file a Land Bank 
bill for Lincoln in the legislature. Revenues from real estate 
transactions in Town would be earmarked for further affordable 
housing and for conservation efforts, which would help reduce 
current demands on the property levy. 

There were other happenings during the year, which, while 
perhaps less weighty, nevertheless affected or will affect our 
lives. After more than two years of work, the Sunnyside Lane 
house, leased from the State and renovated by the Town, is 
finally occupied as an affordable rental unit, with State rental 
subsidies received through the Concord Housing Authority. The 
capping of the landfill is almost complete, and the Town has 
been promised a State grant of up to 50% of the cost. The 
finished plans for the permanent compactor station are in the 
final approval cycle at the Department of Environmental Quality 
Engineering (DEQE) . Our excellent Recycling Committee studied 
the process as it should pertain to Lincoln and concluded we 
should recycle paper and glass. Consequently, in early 1989 we 
intend to begin recycling business paper at the schools and Town 
offices with the remainder going on-line when the compactor 
station is complete. 

Cable TV came to Lincoln in the closing days of 1988. We 
had great pleasure in honoring our Olympic champion, Diana 
Golden, at Town Meeting, and we, the Selectmen, had a marvelous 
time operating on our float to win the grand prize in the Fourth 
of July parade. We were visited by a gentleman from the Soviet 
Union who was interested in what a Board of Selectmen did. Our 
answers we hope gave him insight into how volunteer, democratic 
town government does indeed work. We were most pleasantly 
surprised to be asked to be a Sister City to Matadepera, Spain, 
a town not unlike ours, outside of Barcelona. You will be 
voting on this at the April 1, 1989 Town Meeting. 

The MBTA announced plans to upgrade our commuter train 
platform, and, we hope, to eliminate once and for all the 
problem of having the gates down while a train is in the 
station, thus sometimes impeding emergency vehicle access across 
the tracks and aggravating motorists. Towards the end of the 
year, a group of citizens dedicated to our schools and children 
and to the memory of Michael Stratton, kicked off an effort to 
create an innovative playground called "Strats' Place", funded 
solely by donations. 



4 



We cannot end without remembering some of our friends who 
contributed so much to the Town during their lives, namely 
former Selectman John Garrison, Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High 
School founder Victor Lutnicki, and Charlotte Donaldson who, 
with her family, has contributed in so many, many ways. We 
shall remember John's effortless skating and statesmanship, 
Vic's leadership at DeCordova and in Town Meetings, and 
Charlotte's quiet thought fulness and love of Lincoln. 

Louise Jeffrey, Assistant Town Accountant, retired after 21 
years of excellent and devoted service. Bill Doherty, Joe 
Cotoni, and Bill Dean, with a combined total of 142 years of 
service to the Fire Department, also opted for less strenuous 
avocations. We notice, however, with pleasure that these 
gentlemen are still helping make the Town run in a variety of 
ways, from the compactor station to police communications to 
being a most important element in the transportation of our 
Council On Aging constituents. With sadness and praise for a 
job well done, we accepted Dick Carroll's resignation after 16 
1/2 years on the job as Director of the Department of Public 
Works. He has our best wishes for success as the new 
superintendent of the Sudbury Water District. 

The Flint name has been on many rolls of Town servants, 
dating back to Colonial times, and we were proud to add it one 
more time as we welcomed Warren F. Flint, Jr. to our Board when 
he replaced John Goodrich who had to bow out after one term, due 
to the press of professional obligations. John's statesmanship 
during the Boston Properties conflict is something for which we 
are especially grateful. 

And so it was a busy year, with its triumphs, its serious 
harbingers of the future, its mapwork for the efforts of all the 
boards in 1989 and beyond, its fun, and its sad moments of 
goodbye. But, as always, Lincoln ran and ran well, because so 
many people really cared. You cared enough to put in countless 
hours, to attend meeting after meeting, to come en masse to the 
County Commissioners' hearings, to volunteer for whatever 
positions and committees we had to fill or had created, and you 
brought with you an immensity of talent which continually taught 
and amazed us. Thank you all. 



5 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 

Term Expires 

MODERATOR 



David Donaldson 1990 

TOWN CLERK 

Nancy J. Zuelke 1989 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

John R. Caswell, Chairman 1989 

Susan Fargo 1990 

Warren F. Flint, Jr. 1991 

TOWN TREASURER 

Roy M. Raja 1989 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Douglas M. Burckett, Chairman 1990 

Robert L. Jenal 1991 

Paul Marsh 1989 

COLLECTOR OF TAXES 

Roy M. Raja 1989 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Sarah G. Bobbitt 1990 

Wilson C. Hayes 1989 

Wendy Kameny 1990 

Michaela M. Lipsey 1991 

Joan Walker, Chairman 1989 

WATER COMMISSIONERS 

Leona Champeny 1990 

Robert DeNormandie 1989 

Gabe Farrell, Chairman 1991 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

Joan M. Comstock 1991 

Perry Culver, M.D., Chairman 1990 

John M. O'Loughlin, M.D. 1989 



6 



Term Expires 

REGIONAL DISTRICT SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



Richard F. Brooks, Chairman 1989 

William C. Hewins 1991 

Sarah Cannon Holden 1991 

Geraldine C. Nogelo, Vice Chairman 1989 

David S. Pettit 1990 

Phyllis Rappaport 1990 

CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

Martha DeNormandie 1989 

Marjorie Holland 1990 

H. Arnold MacLean, Chairman 1991 

PLANNING BOARD 

F. Douglas Adams 1993 

Kenneth E. Bassett 1992 

Margery P. Faran 1990 

William G. Constable, Chairman 1989 

Elizabeth Corcoran 1991 

MEASURER OF WOOD AND BARK 

David Elwood 1989 

FENCE VIEWER 

Elizabeth Snelling 1989 

COMMISSIONERS OF TRUST FUNDS 

George C. Hibben 1991 

Virginia M. Niles 1989 

William B. Russell 1990 

TRUSTEES OF BEMIS FUND 

John Curtis Perry 1990 

Harriet V. Relman 1989 

W. Allen Rossiter 1991 

TRUSTEES OF LINCOLN LIBRARY 

Craig Hill self-perpetuating 

Douglas Harding 

Mary Newman, Chairman 

Carol White (School Committee's Appointee) 1991 

Barbara Low (Elected by Town) 1989 

Walter Salmon (Selectmen's Appointee) 1990 



7 



Term Expires 



DECORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 
"A" Trustees 



Lynn Gargill (resigned) 1991 

John French 1990 

Gregory G. Harney 1992 

Julia Pugh 1989 

Robert C. Frank (appointed) 1991 

"B" Trustees 

Meredyth Hyatt Moses (School Committee's Appointee) 1989 

Barbara Sisson (Library Trustee's Appointee) 1991 

Margaret Wengren (Selectmen's Appointee) 1990 

HOUSING COMMISSION 

Lorian Brown 1989 

Giles Browne 1989 

Raymond Johnson (Appointed by the State), Chairman 1989 

Elizabeth (Lee) Harrison 1991 

Henry Morgan (Selectmen's Appointee) 1989 

RECREATION COMMITTEE 

John Adams, Chairman (elected post) 1989 

Elizabeth Evans (elected post) 1990 

Peter Watkinson (elected post) 1991 

Monika Duborg (Selectmen's appointee) 1990 

George W. Seeley (Selectmen's appointee) 1991 

John Walker (Selectmen's appointee) 1989 



8 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 
APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 



Term Expires 



David Ramsay 1991 

TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

Betty L. Lang 1991 

ASSISTANT EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 
Alyson A. Morse 1989 

TOWN COUNSEL 

David Dinwoodey 1989 
Thomas Arnold 1989 

TOWN ENGINEER 

Frank C. Emmons, Jr. 1989 

DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS 
Richard P. Carroll 1989 

CHIEF OF POLICE 

Dominick James Arena 1989 

DEPUTY CHIEF OF POLICE-PROSECUTOR 
Charles E. Doyle 1989 

POLICE SERGEANT 

David Davis 1989 

INSPECTOR 

Allen Bowles 1989 

POLICE OFFICERS 

David Eysie 1989 
John Fitzgerald 1989 
Robert Gallo 1989 
Richard J. Hallett 1989 
Patrick Kenney 1989 



(jeraxd Manoney 




1 QQQ 


Kevin Mooney 




1989 


Thomas Mo ran 




1989 


Barbara Bardsley 




1989 




CONSTABLES 




Dominick James Arena 




1989 


Charles E. Doyle 




1989 




DOG OFFICER 




Barbara King 




1989 




FIRE CHIEF 




Dominick James Arena 




1989 




TREE WARDEN 





LOCAL SUPT. OF SHADE TREE MANAGEMENT 
Todd Brown 1989 

FOREST WARDEN 

Dominick James Arena 1989 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 
Ernest L. Johnson 1989 

BUILDING INSPECTOR 
Ernest L. Johnson 1989 

WIRING INSPECTOR 

Kenneth Desmond 1989 

PLUMBING INSPECTOR 
Russell J. Dixon 1989 

DIRECTOR OF DEFENSE & EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS 
Thomas B. Moran 1989 

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF DEFENSE & EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS 
David W. Ramsay 1989 



10 



COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER 

Eric Williams 1989 

ASSISTANT COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER 

Curtis Risley 1989 

HAZARDOUS WASTE COORDINATOR 

Richard Goddard 1989 

VETERANS' AGENT 

William B. Whalen 1989 

VETERANS' GRAVE OFFICER 

William B. Whalen 1989 

TOWN HISTORIAN 

Margaret M. Martin 1989 

REGISTRARS OF VOTERS 

Peggy Elliot 1989 

William G. Langton 1991 

Eleanor M. Wilfert 1990 
Nancy J. Zuelke, ex officio 

MINUTEMAN HOME CARE 

Ruth Morey 1989 

Marie Gavin, Alternate 1989 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

John Quincy Adams, Chairman 1991 

Thomas Billings 1990 

Claire Cunningham 1990 

Joan Kimball 1990 

Robert Mack 1991 

Nathalie Rice 1989 

William J. Rizzo, Jr. 1989 

COUNCIL ON AGING 

Charlotte Barnaby 1990 

Robert Brown 1991 

Selima Chandler 1990 

Mirian Cook 1991 

William Davis, Chairman 1989 



11 



Shirley Drew 1990 

Barbara Grim 1991 

Sally Mansfield 1989 

Ruth Morey 1991 

Margaretta Schmertzler 1991 

Ann Satterfield 1989 

Aire-Maija Schwann 1989 

Ruth Kramer, Coordinator 1989 

LINCOLN HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

John Benson (architect) 1990 

John Carman, Chairman (realtor) 1989 

Elizabeth Donaldson (at large) 1989 

Colin Smith (District) 1991 

Mary Spindler (Society) 1990 

HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 

John Benson (architect) 1990 

John Carman, Chairman (realtor) 1989 

Elizabeth Corcoran (Planning Bd.) 1989 

Elizabeth Donalson (at large) 1989 

Palmer Faran (Planning Bd.) 1991 

Colin Smith (District) 1991 

Mary Spindler (Society) 1990 

Kenneth Hurd, Alternate (District) 1990 

Kim Kassner, Alternate 1991 

PIERCE PROPERTY COMMITTEE 

Patricia Asaff 1990 

Nelson Chu 1990 

Edward Ferri 1991 

Wendy Finnerty 1991 

1989 

Margot Green 1988 

Judy Gross 1990 

LINCOLN ARTS COUNCIL 

Patricia Adams 1989 

Irene Briedis 1989 

Jane Cooper, Chairman 1990 

Eleanor Friedman 1989 

Richard Lee 1989 

Julia Pugh 1989 

Margaret Ann Rice, Vice Chairman 1989 

Margaret Stathos 1990 



12 



REPRESENTATIVES TO HANSCOM FIELD ADVISORY COMMISSION 



Richard Theriault, North Lincoln Association Representative 1989 
Elizabeth Corcoran, "At Large" Representative 1989 

REPRESENTATIVES TO HANSCOM AREA STUDY COMMITTEE (HATS) II 

John Caswell, Selectmen's Appointee 
Terrence Fenton, Member at Large 
Elizabeth Corcoran, Planning Board Appointee 
Richard Theriault, HFAC member 

REPRESENTATIVE TO MBTA ADVISORY BOARD 

Gwendolyn desCognets 1989 
William Litant, Alternate 1989 
Alfred Sevill, Alternate 1989 

REPRESENTATIVE ON WALDEN POND BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

John Quincy Adams 1989 

REPRESENTATIVE TO METROPOLITAL AREA PLANNING COUNCIL (MAPC) 

William Constable 1989 

REPRESENTATIVE TO MIDDLESEX COUNTY ADVISORY BOARD 

Susan Fargo 1989 



REPRESENTATIVE TO NORTH EAST SOLID WASTE COMMITTEE 



Henry Rugo 1989 

Dave W. Ramsay, Alternate 1989 

REPRESENTATIVES TO CONCORD-ASSABET AREA COUNCIL FOR CHILDREN 

Jane Appel 1989 

Cynthia Moller 1989 

BOARD OF APPEALS 

Morton Braun 1993 

C. Russel Hansen 1990 

D'Arcy MacMahon 1989 

Margaret B. Marsh, Chairman 1992 

Despena Billings 1991 

John Solman, Associate Member 1990 

Amalie Kass, Associate Member 1992 



13 



CELEBRATION COMMITTEE 



Henry Morgan 1989 

Jeffrey Mudge, Chairman 1990 

Clare Pinto, Co-chairman 1991 

Robert Pinto 1991 

Robert M. Fraser 1990 

PUBLIC SAFETY BOARD 

Glenn Gustavson 1989 

John Stevenson 1988 

J. Michael Tannert 1988 

Rob Webb 1989 



ROUTE 128 AREA COMMITTEE 

Susan Carr 
Terry Fenton 
Earl Flansburg 
Rollin Johnson 
John Ritsher 

Ann F. Sutherland, Chairman 
Edward Schwartz 
Richard Wiggin 



BEMIS HALL ADVISORY COMMITTEE 
Debra Haiduven (Recreation Director) 

Barbara Beal (Representative of Friends of the Library) 

Christel Ide (Representative of First Parish Church) 

Ruth Kramer (Council on Aging Coordinator) 

Daniel Spaeth (Representative of Lincoln Players) 

Eleanor Wilfert (Representative of the Lincoln Grange), Chairman 

Alyson A, Morse, Ex officio 

CABLE T.V. ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



Jack Carver 
Gabe Far re 11 
Josephine K. Gump 
John Klobuchar 
Stephen Low, Chairman 
Nathan Parke 
Joseph Rosen 

WATER MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE 

Pat Allen 
Richard Carroll 
Leona Champeny 



14 



Robert DeNormandie 
Frank Emmons 
Gabe Farrell 



AQUIFER PROTECTION STUDY COMMITTEE 

Rebecca Bartovics (Water Commission's Appointee) 
Jonathan Cohen (Selectmen's appointee) 
William Constable (Planning Board Rep) 
Alan Eschenroeder (Selectmen's appointee) 
Daniel Hunt (Selectmen's appointee) 
John Kimball (Selectmen's appointee) 
Nathalie Rice, Chairman (Conservation Rep) 
Edward Rolfe (Selectmen's appointee) 
Beth Schuller (Board of Health Rep) 

LAND BANK STUDY COMMITTEE 

Christopher Klem 
Lois Love 

Edward Schuller, Chairman 
Kemon Taschioglou 
Lawrence Thompson 

BETHANY COMMITTEE 

James Ames 

Charlotte Barnaby 

Richard Beinecke, Ex officio 

Richard Bennett, Ex officio 

Robert Burnham 

Claire Cunningham 

Elizabeth Downey, Chairman 

Stephen Gray 

Lee Harrison 

Kim Kassner 

Guido Perrera 

Dorothy Smith, Ex officio 

NORTH LINCOLN MARKETING COMMITTEE 

Caroll Blake 
Lorian Brown 
Giles Browne 
Elizabeth Corcoran 
Martha DeNormandie 
Janet Frazier 
Julie Holbrook 
Polly Jackson 
Raymond Johnson 
Robert Keuhn 
Mary Helen Lorenz 



15 



Katherine McHugh 
Ana Perez 
William Russell 
Elizabeth Snelling 
Jane Telling 
Art Tetreault 

RECYCLING COMMITTEE 

Abigail Avery 
Vicki Diadiuk 
Harry Hadley 
Gwen Loud 
Enid Sichel 

PUBLIC SAFETY STUDY COMMITTEE 

D. James Arena (Chief) 

Allen Bowles (Police Rep) 

Richard Goddard (Fire Rep) 

Edward Rolfe (At large) 

Donald Seckler (At large) 

Michael Tennican (Fin Com liaison) 



SPECIAL POLICE 



Leo Algeo, Sr. 


1989 


Neal Archambault 


1989 


Barbara Bardsley 


1989 


Donald Bardsley 


1989 


Raymond Barnes 


1989 


Dennis A. Botelho 


1989 


Richard Carroll 


1989 


Steven G. Carter 


1989 


Frank Caruso 


1989 


Joseph Cavanaugh 


1989 


John Ciraso 


1989 


Arthur Cotoni 


1989 


Lorraine Dean 


1989 


William Dean 


1989 


Neil Duane 


1989 


Frank Emmons 


1989 


Richard Goddard 


1989 


Frank Gordon, Jr. 


1989 


Frank Gordon, Sr. 


1989 


Stephen Hupalo 


1989 


Ernest Johnson 


1989 


Herbert Kelley, Jr. 


1989 


William Kennedy 


1989 


Charlene Khosabjian 


1989 


Harold Leary 


1989 


Steven Lennon 


1989 


David Maher 


1989 



16 



Term Expires 

SPECIAL POLICE CONT. 



Hazel Mclnnis 


1989 


Richard McCarty 


1989 


John Morris 


1989 


Gerald Mullen 


1989 


Michael Murphy 


1989 


Thomas O'Brien 


1989 


Charles O'Loughlin 


1989 


William Orpik 


1989 


John Navarro 


1989 


Ruth Perlow (Cons, ranger) 


1989 


Theodore Poulos 


1989 


Seth Rafferty 


1989 


Richard Russes 


1989 


William Ryan 


1989 


Thomas C. Spencer 


1989 


Barbara J. Terrio 


1989 


Tara Tracy 


1989 


Walter Van Wart 


1989 


Barbara Walther 


1989 


David Whalen 


1989 


John Whalen 


1989 


William Whalen, Jr. 


1989 


William Whalen, Sr. 


- 1989 


Eric Williams 


1989 


Jonathan Searle 


1989 


Robert Morrison 


1989 


James Lang 


1989 


Susan Mead 


1989 


Robert Ashline 


1989 


Everett Pekins 


1989 


Joseph Driscoll 


1989 


Mary McCue 


1989 


Elizabeth Bickford 


1989 


Richard Marcou 


1989 


Jennifer A. Enroth 


1989 


Maria Mercuri 


1989 


Anne Jorgenson 


1989 


Richard Turncotte 


1989 



SPECIAL POLICE - TRAFFIC CONTROL 

Robert M. Collina, Jr. 

Patricia Foley 

Peer Gailis 

William A. Hollowell 

Joseph Lenox, Sr. 

Kenneth Rivers 



17 



MINUTEMAN NATIONAL PARK COMMITTEE 



J. Quincy Adams (Conservation Commission) 
Palmer Faran (Planning Board) 
Kenneth Bassett (Planning Board) 
David O'Neil (Traffic Management) 
Terrance Fenton (Traffic Management) 

WANG PROPERTIES 
SPECIAL OFFICERS 



Anthony Aieta 
Lonni Brabham 
Edward Chapman 
Brian Deacy 
Donald Driscoll 
Thomas Fagan 
John Friberg 
John Harrington 
Robert Knowlton 
Robert Le Blanc 
Edward Mastrocola 
Robert McKenna 
Dwane Rich 
John Skerry 
Robert Wegner 
Scott Reidy 
Peter Vroman 



OTHER SPECIAL OFFICERS 

Minuteman Vocational High School Properties Only: Dennis Deeb 
and Randall Fox 

Audubon/Drumlin Properties Only: David Hill and Daniel Hart 
Cambridge Water Dept. Properties: Henry Manuel 



20 



TOWN CLERK 



Nancy J. Zuelke 

The Town Clerk is the official recorder of Town events and 
activities and issues licenses and certificates. Her duties 
include recording the proceedings at Town Meetings and 
Elections, and notifying the Selectmen and other officers 
concerned of appropriations which have been voted. 

The record of registered voters of Lincoln is kept in the 
Town Clerk's office. Persons wishing to become voters in the 
Town should communicate with the Clerk. 

PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY 
March 8, 1988 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the Polls were opened at 7:00 
a.m. by Town Clerk, Nancy J. Zuelke for the bringing in of votes 
to the Primary Officers for the election of candidates of 
political parties for the following offices. Mrs. Zuelke was 
assisted throughout the day by the following wardens: Charlotte 
Donaldson, Peggy Elliott, Eugenia Flint, William Langton, Arnold 
MacLean, Elizabeth Snelling, Eleanor Wilfert and Fred Wilfert. 
The Polls were declared closed at 8:00 p.m. The total number of 
votes were as follows: Democratic: Precinct 1 - 220; Precinct 2 
- 695; for a total Democratic vote of 915. Republican: Precinct 
1 - 173; Precinct 2 - 362; for a total Republican vote of 535. 

REPUBLICAN 

Office Candidate Prec. 1 Prec. 2 Total 



Presidential 


Pierre S. duPont 


3 


6 


9 


Preference 


Marion G. (Pat) 










Robertson 


6 


1 


7 




George Bush 


111 


233 


344 




Alexander M. Haig, 


Jr. 


1 


1 




Jack Kemp 


6 


9 


15 




Bob Dole 


45 


102 


147 




No Preference 





6 


6 




Blanks 


2 


4 


6 






173 


362 


535 


State Committee 


Paul F. X. Powers 


111 


238 


349 


Man 


Blanks 


62 


124 


186 






173 


362 


535 


State Committee 


Joyce W. Kidd 


123 


261 


384 


Woman 


Blanks 


50 


102 


151 






173 


362 


535 



21 



Office 



Candidate 



Prec. 1 Prec. 2 Total 



Town Committee Group 1 (Votes for 



entire group) 


86 


195 


281 


William B. Russell 


106 


237 


343 


Gwendolyn desCognets 


112 


235 


347 


Robert J. Kelleher 


88 


214 


302 


Elizabeth J. Peavy 


109 


221 


330 


Margaret G. Puffer 


102 


222 


324 


John L. Armstrong 


101 


216 


317 


Winthrop B. Walker 


102 


222 


324 


Guido R. Perera, Jr. 


103 


239 


342 


Elizabeth Kimmach 


90 


210 


300 


Alexander Ellis, Jr. 


115 


244 


359 


Nancy B. Ellis 


120 


257 


377 


Lucia T. MacMahon 


104 


243 


347 


Richard H. Churchill 


95 


208 


303 


Mary W. Munroe 


94 


225 


319 


Alice Patricia Sweeney 92 


210 


302 


Mary H. Kitses 


98 


230 


328 


Nancy J. Coons 


100 


223 


323 


Jon T. Barry 


94 


218 


312 


Glover B. Mayfield 


101 


225 


326 


John R. Caswell 


107 


248 


355 


Katherine J. Kelleher 


91 


205 


296 


Eleanor M. Gallitano 


102 


234 


336 


Donna G. Burt 


91 


209 


300 


Margaret A. Spaeth 


103 


223 


326 


Lawrence W. Whitman 


93 


214 


307 


Dana W. Atchley, Jr. 


99 


224 


323 


Lawrence A. Collins 


95 


210 


305 


Blanks 


1878 


3513 


5391 




4671 


9774 


14445 



22 



DEMOCRATIC 



UIIlCc 


fan <4 -f Ha t-p 


Prop 1 
x tree • x 




9 Tnl- 

w- IOC 


rresiQentiai 


M-f^V»ao1 Q TYiilralffc 


12S 

X£ J 


37£ 


499 


Pref erence 


niocii wore j <j r ■ 


7 


A3 


50 

Ju 






2 


1 


3 




Paul C -t mr\n 


7 


j j 


fiO 
ou 




DL ULC Da UU1 L L 


3 


14 

It 


1 7 

X / 




iXXCItdxCl H • uCpUdLQ L 


21 


22 


43 




jesse Jj« jacKson 


£7 


1 70 
x / u 


917 




*aary narc 


1 
x 


A 


J 




Lyndon H. LaRouche 













No Preference 


3 


2 


5 




•Dxantcs 


A 


1 2 
i£ 


i (\ 
xo 






zzu 


O ,/ J 


01 e; 

71J 


State Committee 


Chester G. Atkins 


142 


529 


671 


Man 

nan 


DiailKS 


7ft 
/ 


100 








990 

Z.Z.U 


O .7 J 


Ql Q 


State Committee 


Car la C. Cataldo 


54 


160 


214 


Woman 


Lorraine Greiff 


90 


301 


391 




Rl anlfc 

U XdlllN. O 


76 


234 


31 






920 


i69T 


9T5 

71J 


Town Cnmni "t t" t" pp 


U 1 UUp X \ VULCO 1UI. 










CI1LJ.1C g X <J Ll {J / 


98 


344 


442 




T.OIIi'qP K DpRflrvQlip 

JjUUJ.DC In. • iVCUd L V ollC 


114 


379 


493 




iNxcoxe Hi* ueDaxysne 


in 
111 


373 

j / j 


£ft£ 




Ppf-pr H Rnt-h<st-p-f n 
i clcj. n • i\u Liia Lcin 


106 


384 


490 




uavici i-> • laax xxson 


12? 

XZ. J 


£39 
tot 


555 

J J J 




A 1 "1 r» a T? ^AT'i*'! onn 

ri-Lj.ee j-j • vra. it rison 


lift 

-L JLO 


£21 

H^X 


S39 

J J 7 




JZiLUallUe J. rlaXex 


1 09 


393 


509 




U"f 1 1 "f am ^ T anofrtn 
WlllldUJ V7 • uaUs LUll 


no 


432 

*T ~J t. 


548 




juiin jj • rxencii 


lift 

XXO 


L71 

Ht. / 


5£5 

JH J 




ueLiuxaii »-i • r r encii 


lift 
XXO 


£90 


53fi 

J JO 




C \t 1 \r "T a Ma ■? or 
jyivia i id. lei 


108 


388 

JUU 


496 




MarV Ma "i man 

narK. iNaxinan 


1 07 

XU / 


JO / 


£9£ 




Amir Tono T*7*i n/^na 1 1 

runy jane u» wincneii 


117 

1.1.1 


AAl 

411 


55ft 

J JO 




MvT*nn p 1 1 tipt - R nopT<? 


104 


363 


467 




Jalall 11* \jKJ X L.UX CLU 


1 09 

X \J J 


393 


502 




VJ C X a. X LI JL 11C IX • J-iXlllieXX 


111 

111 


374 


48 5 

to _J 




xxvxng leiiing 


1 ?n 


JO J 


SOS 
JU J 




nenxy n« rioxgan 


1 99 


A7ft 
*+ / 


nOO 

ouu 




Tana P To 1 1 -t no 

j a lie »w> • j.exxxng 


117 


394 

J^7 *+ 


51 1 

JXX 




farnl "R Allan 

L.axux is • fixxen 


1 OA 

XUO 


3ft7 
JO / 


£93 

H 7 J 




W RnhpTt Pa a T*ma i n 
m • ivu uc i- l. jr c d x. met x li 


118 

XX D 


425 


543 




66* • UXX1ULL 


114 


414 


528 




llal OllaXX l_> a. IIU. IV 


104 


375 


479 




Cnean f I"a ron 
uuoaii \j 9 r a igu 


1 29 


£56 


585 

JO J 




RHwatH H Mnroflti 

ijuwaiu 11 • lluxz^cLil 


105 

XUJ 


366 


471 

t / X 




wesxey ±« rrost 


10s 

XUJ 


3n7 
JO / 


£79 




XllUQiao D» ri.Qd.Lub 


1 29 

X44 


AAft 


S70 
J / u 




John Adams 


130 


437 


567 




Blanks 


2763 


7482 


10245 






5940 


18765 


24705 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
March 26, 1988 



Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the Meeting was called 
to order in the Brooks School Auditorium on March 26, 1988 by 
the Moderator, Mr. David M. Donaldson, at 9:35 a.m., and a 
quorum being present, (443 voters throughout the day) the 
following business was transacted: 

The Moderator called attention to Article 1 (Election of 
Officers), which will be acted upon on Monday, March 28, 1988, 
at the Brooks School Auditorium, with the polls being open from 
7:30 a.m. until 8 p.m. 

The Moderator brought before the Meeting consideration of 
those articles which have been placed on the Consent Calendar, 
copies of which were sent to the voters at least seven days 
before the Town Meeting. It was voted to hold out Article 8; 
the other articles on the Consent Calendar (2, 3, 4, and 7) were 
then adopted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 2. To bring in their votes for any Committees, 
Commissioners, Trustees, and other officers 

required by law to be elected by ballot or otherwise. 

VOTED: (On Consent Calendar) 

That Dave Elwood be elected Measurer of Wood and 

Bark and Elizabeth Snelling be elected Fence Viewer for the 

ensuing year. 

ARTICLE 3. To hear and act upon the reports of the Town 

Officers, Committees, Commissioners and Trustees. 

VOTED: (On Consent Calendar) 

That the reports of the Town Officers, Committees, 

Commissioners, and Trustees, as printed in the Town Report, be 

accepted. 

ARTICLE 4. To fix the salaries and compensation of the several 
elective officers of the Town and to determine 

whether any Department, Board or Committee shall be authorized 

to employ for additional compensation any of its members and to 

fix additional compensation of such members. 

VOTED: (On Consent Calendar) 

That the salaries of the elected officials of the 
Town for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 1988, 

and ending June 30, 1989, be fixed at the following amounts: 

Town Clerk $500.00 

Treasurer and Collector 10.00 

Assessors, Chairman 200.00 

Assessors, other members, each 175.00 

Water Commissioners, each 75.00 

and that the Board of Assessors is authorized to employ two of 
its members to work on assessing duties at salaries not to 
exceed $21,000 and $5,200, respectively for the said fiscal 
period. 



24 



ARTICLE 5. To raise and appropriate money for the necessary 

and expedient purposes of the Town, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: (Unanimously, except where otherwise stated) 

That the Town adopt as separate appropriations the 
recommendations listed in Exhibit 4, attached to the report of 
the Finance Committee, printed on pages 12 through 21, 
inclusive, of the Financial Section and Warrant for the 1988 
Annual Town Meeting and that all items be raised by taxation 
except to the following extent and to the extent provided in a 
second motion to be made under this Article: 



Item 15 Town Offices - Salaries - $60,000. to be taken from 

Water Department receipts and $34,000. to be taken 
from the Air Force School Account. 

Item 40 Conservation - Salaries - $10,500. to be taken from 

Conservation Commission Agency Account. 

Item 205 Animal Officer - Salary and Expense - $328. to be 

taken from the Agency Account established for fees 
received for care and custody of dogs. 

Item 502 Elementary School - Instruction - $79,852. to be 
taken from Metco funds. 



Item 504 Elementary School - Operation and Maintenance - 

$177. to be taken from the Grammar School Fund and 
$1,797. to be taken from the Julian DeCordova 
School Equipment Fund. 

Item 520 Library - Salaries - $165. to be taken from Dog Tax 
Receipts. 

Item 521 Library - Books - $3,732. to be taken from State 
Aid to Libraries. 

Item 821 Codman Barn Repair Loan - $5,000. to be taken from 
the Agency Account established for funds to be 
received from the Codman Trustees. 

Item 822 Interest on Codman Barn Repair Loan - $137.50 to be 
taken from the Agency Account established for funds 
to be received from the Codman Trustees. 



Reserve Fund - $65,000. to be 

Item 950- Water Department 
956 Water Department 



taken from Overlay Reserve. 

- $424,700. to be taken from 
receipts. 



25 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
March 26, 1988 



Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the Meeting was called 
to order in the Brooks School Auditorium on March 26, 1988 by 
the Moderator, Mr. David M. Donaldson, at 9:35 a.m., and a 
quorum being present, (443 voters throughout the day) the 
following business was transacted: 

The Moderator called attention to Article 1 (Election of 
Officers), which will be acted upon on Monday, March 28, 1988, 
at the Brooks School Auditorium, with the polls being open from 
7:30 a.m. until 8 p.m. 

The Moderator brought before the Meeting consideration of 
those articles which have been placed on the Consent Calendar, 
copies of which were sent to the voters at least seven days 
before the Town Meeting. It was voted to hold out Article 8; 
the other articles on the Consent Calendar (2, 3, 4, and 7) were 
then adopted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 2. To bring in their votes for any Committees, 
Commissioners, Trustees, and other officers 

required by law to be elected by ballot or otherwise. 

VOTED: (On Consent Calendar) 

That Dave Elwood be elected Measurer of Wood and 

Bark and Elizabeth Snelling be elected Fence Viewer for the 

ensuing year. 

ARTICLE 3. To hear and act upon the reports of the Town 

Officers, Committees, Commissioners and Trustees. 

VOTED: (On Consent Calendar) 

That the reports of the Town Officers, Committees, 

Commissioners, and Trustees, as printed in the Town Report, be 

accepted . 

ARTICLE 4. To fix the salaries and compensation of the several 
elective officers of the Town and to determine 

whether any Department, Board or Committee shall be authorized 

to employ for additional compensation any of its members and to 

fix additional compensation of such members. 

VOTED: (On Consent Calendar) 

That the salaries of the elected officials of the 
Town for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 1988, 

and ending June 30, 1989, be fixed at the following amounts: 

Town Clerk $500.00 

Treasurer and Collector 10.00 

Assessors, Chairman 200.00 

Assessors, other members, each 175.00 

Water Commissioners, each 75.00 

and that the Board of Assessors is authorized to employ two of 
its members to work on assessing duties at salaries not to 
exceed $21,000 and $5,200, respectively for the said fiscal 
period. 



24 



ARTICLE 5. To raise and appropriate money for the necessary 

and expedient purposes of the Town, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: (Unanimously, except where otherwise stated) 

That the Town adopt as separate appropriations the 
recommendations listed in Exhibit 4, attached to the report of 
the Finance Committee, printed on pages 12 through 21, 
inclusive, of the Financial Section and Warrant for the 1988 
Annual Town Meeting and that all items be raised by taxation 
except to the following extent and to the extent provided in a 
second motion to be made under this Article: 



Item 15 Town Offices - Salaries - $60,000. to be taken from 

Water Department receipts and $34,000. to be taken 
from the Air Force School Account. 

Item 40 Conservation - Salaries - $10,500. to be taken from 

Conservation Commission Agency Account. 

Item 205 Animal Officer - Salary and Expense - $328. to be 
taken from the Agency Account established for fees 
received for care and custody of dogs. 

Item 502 Elementary School - Instruction - $79,852. to be 
taken from Metco funds. 



Item 504 Elementary School - Operation and Maintenance - 

$177. to be taken from the Grammar School Fund and 
$1,797. to be taken from the Julian DeCordova 
School Equipment Fund. 

Item 520 Library - Salaries - $165. to be taken from Dog Tax 
Receipts. 

Item 521 Library - Books - $3,732. to be taken from State 
Aid to Libraries. 

Item 821 Codman Barn Repair Loan - $5,000. to be taken from 
the Agency Account established for funds to be 
received from the Codman Trustees. 

Item 822 Interest on Codman Barn Repair Loan - $137.50 to be 
taken from the Agency Account established for funds 
to be received from the Codman Trustees. 



Reserve Fund - $65,000. to be 

Item 950- Water Department 
956 Water Department 



taken from Overlay Reserve. 

- $424,700. to be taken from 
receipts. 



25 



The following numbered accounts were amended on the floor of 
Town Meeting: 



Item 306 Transfer Station will increase to $270,050. 

Item 501 School Administration will increase to $134,194. 

Item 806 Debt Service - Interest on School Roof Loan will 
decrease to 32,100. 

Item 816 Debt Service - Interest on Bathhouse Loan will 
decrease to $9,130. 

Item 826 Debt Service - Interest on McHugh Conservation Land 
will decrease to $34,445. 

Item 827 Debt Service - McHugh Serial Loan will decrease 
to 0. 

Item 830 Debt Service - Interst on Library Addition Loan 
will decrease to $128,295.50. 



Item 832 Debt Service - Interest on Library Renovation Loan 
will decrease to $15,274.50. 

Item 900 Middlesex County Pension Fund will decrease to 
$357,354. 

Item 901 Employee Hospital & Insurance Fund will increase to 
$334,000. 



The Total for General Purposes for the fiscal year beginning 
July 1, 1988, through June 30, 1989, is shown as $10,093,570.22, 
and with the amendments listed above is now $9,499,801.22. 
After the application of the special funds as listed above, the 
amount to be raised is $9,239,012.72. 

At the conclusion of action on all the articles calling for the 
expenditure of money (after Article 29), it was voted 
unanimously as follows (as a second motion under Article 5) 

VOTED : That the sum of $62,228. be taken from Free Cash to 

reduce the total amount to be raised by taxation, 
as voted under the first motion under this Article 
5. 



(This second motion was TABLED following the first vote under 
Article 5 until action on Article 29 had been completed.) 



26 



ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 

appropriate a sum of money, in addition to that 
authorized under Article 5 of this Warrant, to provide general 
pay increases for non-union employees as may be granted by the 
Selectmen and/or the Library Trustees, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 
VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of 
$13,221. to the Library, and $51,779. to the remaining Town 
departments for the fiscal year 1989, said sum to be taken from 
Free Cash, to provide general pay increases for non-union 
employees as may be granted by the Selectmen and/or the Library 
Trustees. 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town 

Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to 
borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of 
the financial year beginning July 1, 1988, in accordance with 
the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44 Section 4, as 
amended, and to issue a note or notes therefor, payable within 
one year, and to renew any note or notes as may be given for a 
period of less than one year, in accordance with General Laws, 
Chapter 44, Section 17, as amended. 
VOTED: (On Consent Calendar) 

That the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the 
Selectmen, be and hereby is authorized to borrow money from time 
to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year 
beginning July 1, 1988, in accordance with the provisions of 
General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, as amended, and to issue a 
note or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew 
any note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one 
year, in accordance with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17, 
as amended. 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will authorize the Board of 

Selctmen and the School Committee to continue the 
Town's annual contract with the Secretary of Defense to operate 
the elementary school at Hanscom Air Force Base, Bedford, 
Massachusetts, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town authorize the Board of Selectmen and 
the School Committee to continue the Town's annual contract with 
the Secretary of Defense to operate the elementary school at 
Hanscom Air Force Base, Bedford, Massachusetts. 

An amendment to apportion administration on a per pupil 
enrollment basis was defeated by a majority voice vote. 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to support the School 

Committee in its continuing plan to bring a limited 
number of children from Boston to Lincoln Schools for purposes 
of education, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town authorize the School Committee to 
continue the plan to bring a limited number of children from 
Boston to the Lincoln Schools for purposes of education. 

An amendment to reduce the pupil/teacher ratio by four was 
defeated by a majority voice vote. 



ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will approve either or both of 

the following two Amendments to the Lincoln-Sudbury 
Regional School District Agreement, dated March, 1954 and as 
heretofore amended (the "Agreement"), as proposed by vote of the 
Lincoln-Sudbury Regional District School Committee: 

Amendment A 

1. Section 5 of the Agreement is amended to read in its 
entirety as follows: 

"5. Apportionment of Expenses and Other Items 

(a) Apportionment of Costs 

The several costs of construction and operation of 
the District and payments of principal of and 
interest on its bonds, notes and other obligations 
shall be apportioned to the member towns as 
follows: each member town f s share for each fiscal 
period shall be determined by computing the ratio 
which the sum of its pupil enrollments in the 
regional school district on October 1 of the three 
years next preceding the start of such fiscal 
period bears to the sum of the pupil enrollments in 
the regional school district of all the member 
towns on October 1 of the same three years. The 
Treasurer of each member town shall pay to the 
Treasurer of the District the amount of such town's 
share of each installment of principal of and 
interest on bonds, notes and other obligations of 
the District at least thirty days before the due 
date thereof. The Treasurer of each member town 
shall pay to the Treasurer of the District the 
amount of such town's apportioned and certified 
share of all other expenses in twelve equal 
installments on the tenth day of each month. 

(b) Apportionment of State and Federal Aid 

Any Federal, State or other aid or grants received 
by the District shall be credited by the District 
to its budgeted expenses, and the apportionment to 
the member towns under subpart (a) above shall be 
the net costs after the application of said aid or 
grants. 

(c) Miscellaneous Income Defined 

Miscellaneous Income shall include all income of 
the District other than the assessments paid by the 
member towns pursuant to subpart (a) above any any 
Federal, State or other aid or grants." 



28 



2. Section 7 of the Agreement is amended by substituting 
for the last sentence of the first paragraph the following: 

"The withdrawing Town's share of future maturing 
principal and interest shall be computed in 
accordance with Section 5(a), with credit for State 
aid as provided in Section 5 (b), at the time of 
giving of such notice." 

3. Section 9 of the Agreement is amended as follows: 

(A) By amending the last sentence of the 
third-to-last paragraph to read as follows: 

"Not later than forty-five days prior to the 
earliest date on which the business session of the 
annual town meeting of any member town is to be 
held, but in no event later than March 31 of such 
period (provided that said budget need not be 
adopted earlier than February 1), the Committee 
shall adopt a budget for the ensuing fiscal period 
and apportion the amount thereof between the member 
towns according to their respective apportionment 
ratios as set forth in Section 5(a)." 

(B) By striking out the next-to-last paragraph in 
its entirety. 

4. This Amendment A shall take effect with respect to the 
first fiscal period of the District beginning at least six 
months after the approval of this Amendment A by each of 
the member towns, and each fiscal period thereafter. 

AMENDMENT B 

1. Section 5 of the Agreement is amended by adding at the 
end the following subsection: 

" Excess and Deficiency Fund 

All unexpended funds, or any portion therof, may in 
the discretion of the Regional District School 
Committee and with the written approval of the 
Finance Committees of each of the member towns, be 
paid into the Excess and Deficiency Fund provided, 
however, that at no time shall the total of the 
sums in the Excess and Deficiency Fund exceed five 
percent (5%) of the total District budget for the 
succeeding fiscal period. Monies in the Excess and 
Deficiency Fund may be expended, in the discretion 
of the Regional District School Committee for any 
of the following purposes: (i) to meet 
extraordinary and non-recurring costs attributable 
to the operation and maintenance of the Regional 



29 



District School; (ii) to pay any other 
extraordinary costs when amounts from the sources 
described in subparts (a), (b), and (c) above are 
insufficient to pay such costs; or (iii) to reduce 
the assessment to the member towns in any fiscal 
period. Any such reduction of the assessment shall 
be in accordance with apportionment ratios set 
forth in subpart (a) above for the fiscal period in 
which such reduction occurs. Monies paid into the 
Excess and Deficiency Fund shall be deemed received 
and reserved for special purposes within the 
meaning of Section 9." 

2. This Amendment B shall take effect with respect to the 
first fiscal period of the District beginning at least six 
months after the approval of this Amendment B by each of 
the member towns, and each fiscal period thereafter. 

or act on anything relative thereto. 

VOTED under Motion (1): (241 in favor, 11 opposed) 

That the Town approve the following Amendment A to 
the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional School District Agreement, dated 
March, 1954 and as heretofore amended (the "Agreement"), as 
proposed by vote of the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional School District 
Committee: 

Amendment A 

1. Section 5 of the Agreement is amended to read in its 
entirety as follows: 

"5. Apportionment of Expenses and Other Items 

(a) Apportionment of Costs 

The several costs of construction and operation of 
the District and payments of principal of and 
interest on its bonds, notes and other obligations 
shall be apportioned to the member towns as 
follows: each member town's share for each fiscal 
period shall be determined by computing the ratio 
which the sum of its pupil enrollments in the 
regional school district on October 1 of the three 
years next preceding the start of such fiscal 
period bears to the sum of the pupil enrollments in 
the regional school district of all the member 
towns on October 1 of the same three years. The 
Treasurer of each member town shall pay to the 
Treasurer of the District the amount of such town's 
share of each installment of principal of and 
interest on bonds, notes and other obligations of 
the District at least thirty days before the due 
date thereof. The Treasurer of each member town 
shall pay to the Treasurer of the District the 
amount of such town's apportioned and certified 
share of all other expenses in twelve equal 
installments on the tenth day of each month. 



30 



(b) Apportionment of State and Federal Aid 



Any Federal, State or other aid or grants received 
by the District shall be credited by the District 
to its budgeted expenses, and the apportionment to 
the member towns under subpart (a) above shall be 
the net costs after the application of said aid or 
grants. 

(c) Miscellaneous Income Defined 

Miscellaneous Income shall include all income of 
the District other than the assessments paid by the 
member towns pursuant to subpart (a) above and any 
Federal, State or other aid or grants." 

2. Section 7 of the Agreement is amended by substituting 
for the last sentence of the first paragraph the following: 

"The withdrawing Town's share of future maturing 
principal and interest shall be computed in 
accordance with Section 5(a), with credit for State 
aid as provided in Section 5 (b), at the time of 
giving of such notice." 

3. Section 9 of the Agreement is amended as follows: 

(A) By amending the last sentence of the 
third-to-last paragraph to read as follows: 

"Not later than forty-five days prior to the 
earliest date on which the business session of the 
annual town meeting of any member town is to be 
held, but in no event later than March 31 of such 
period (provided that said budget need not be 
adopted earlier than February 1), the Committee 
shall adopt a budget for the ensuing fiscal period 
and apportion the amount thereof between the member 
towns according to their respective apportionment 
ratios as set forth in Section 5(a)." 

(B) By striking out the next-to-last paragraph in 
its entirety. 

4. This Amendment A shall take effect with respect to the 
first fiscal period of the District beginning at least six 
months after the approval of this Amendment A by each of 
the member towns, and each fiscal period thereafter. 



31 



VOTED Under Motion (2): (242 in favor, 6 opposed) 



That the Town approve the following Amendment B to the 
Lincoln-Sudbury Regional School District Agreement, dated 
March, 1954 and as heretofore amended (the "Agreement"), 
as proposed by vote of the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional School 
District Committee: 

AMENDMENT B 

1. Section 5 of the Agreement is amended by adding at the 
end the following subsection: 

" Excess and Deficiency Fund 

All unexpended funds, or any portion therof, may in 
the discretion of the Regional District School 
Committee and with the written approval of the 
Finance Committees of each of the member towns, be 
paid into the Excess and Deficiency Fund provided, 
however, that at no time shall the total of the 
sums in the Excess and Deficiency Fund exceed five 
percent (5%) of the total District budget for the 
succeeding fiscal period. Monies in the Excess and 
Deficiency Fund may be expended, in the discretion 
of the Regional District School Committee for any 
of the following purposes: (i) to meet 
extraordinary and non-recurring costs attributable 
to the operation and maintenance of the Regional 
District School; (ii) to pay any other 
extraordinary costs when amounts from the sources 
described in subparts (a), (b), and (c) above are 
insufficient to pay such costs; or (iii) to reduce 
the assessment to the member towns in any fiscal 
period. Any such reduction of the assessment shall 
be in accordance with apportionment ratios set 
forth in subpart (a) above for the fiscal period in 
which such reduction occurs. Monies paid into the 
Excess and Deficiency Fund shall be deemed received 
and reserved for special purposes within the 
meaning of Section 9." 

2. This Amendment B shall take effect with respect to the 
first fiscal period of the District beginning at least six 
months after the approval of this Amendment B by each of 
the member towns, and each fiscal period thereafter. 

An amendement to maintain the status quo was defeated by a 
majority voice vote. 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will approve the following 

Amendment to the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional School 
District Agreement, dated March, 1954 and as heretofore amended 
(the "Agreement"), as proposed by vote of the Lincoln-Sudbury 
Regional District School Committee: 



32 



AMENDMENT 



1. Section 8 of the Agreement is amended by deleting the 
sentence "Any vote to adopt or reject the proposal shall 
be by written ballot." 

2. This Amendment shall take effect with respect to the 
first fiscal period of the District beginning after the 
approval of this Amendment by each of the member towns, 
and each fiscal period thereafter. 

or act on anything relative thereto. 
VOTED: ^_240 in favor, 11 opposed) 

That the Town approve the following Amendment to 
the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional School District Agreement, dated 
March, 1954 and as heretofore amended (the "Agreement"), as 
proposed by vote of the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional District School 
Committee. 

AMENDMENT 

1. Section 8 of the Agreement is amended by deleting the 
sentence "Any vote to adopt or reject the proposal shall 
be by written ballot." 

2. This Amendment shall take effect with respect to the 
first fiscal period of the District beginning after the 
approval of this Amendment by each of the member towns, 
and each fiscal period thereafter. 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 

appropriate a sum of money by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof 
for the design and construction of a permanent transfer station 
at the landfill site, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of 
$410,000. to be expended by the Selectmen for the design and 
construction of a permanent transfer station at the landfill 
site and non-recurring or extraordinary operating costs 
necessary for and incidental to the transition from the existing 
temporary transfer station to the new permanent facility; and 
that to meet such appropriation the Treasurer, with the approval 
of the Board of Selectmen, is hereby authorized to borrow all of 
said appropriated sum under G.L. c.44, Section 8 (22), as 
amended, and to issue bonds and notes of the Town therefor 
payable in accordance with said G.L. c. 44. 

An amendment to reduce the sum by $32,000 was defeated by a 
majority voice vote. 



33 



ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 

appropriate a sum of money by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof to 
be used by various departments for the purchase of vehicles 
and/or equipment, and to see if the Town will authorize the 
disposal by sale or otherwise of excess vehicles and equipment, 
or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of 
$59,000., said sum to be taken from Free Cash, to be used to 
purchase vehicles for various departments, and to authorize the 
Selectmen to dispose by sale or otherwise of excess vehicles and 
equipment. 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 

appropriate a sum of money by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof to 
lease, purchase or lease with an option to purchase equipment 
and vehicles for various Town departments, and to see if the 
Town will authorize the disposal by sale or otherwise of excess 
vehicles and equipment, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

VOTED under motion (1): (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to appropriate a sum of $25,884. 
from Free Cash to be used for ongoing payments under existing 
leases of equipment for various Town departments. 

VOTED under motion (2): (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of 
$68,130. from Free Cash for the purchase of a new sweeper for 
the Department of Public Works; that to meet such appropriation 
the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is 
hereby authorized to borrow all of said appropriated sum under 
G.L. c.44, Section 7 (9), as amended, and issue bonds and notes 
of the Town therefor payable in accordance with said G.L. c.44; 
that the Selectmen are further authorized to dispose by trade-in 
or otherwise of excess vehicles and equipment in conjunction 
with such purchase; and that the sum of $22,456. be additionally 
appropriated from Free Cash in order to meet the debt service on 
the aforesaid borrowing during Fiscal Year 1989. 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 

appropriate a sum of money by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds, by 

borrowing or any combination thereof for the repair and 

maintenance of certain Town buildings, or take any other action 

relative thereto. 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of 

$7,000. from Free Cash for the repair and maintenance of certain 

Town buildings. 



34 



ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to (i) raise and 

appropriate a sum of money by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof 
for renovations to the Codman Barns, said monies to be added to 
funds previously appropriated for such renovations under Article 
31 of the Warrant for the 1986 Annual Town Meeting (the "1986 
Appropriation"), or (ii) take alternative action to direct the 
1986 Appropriation towards specific renovations of the Barns, or 
take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of 
$10,000. from Free Cash for renovations to the Codman Barns, 
said appropriation to be added to approximately $18,000. of 
funds previously appropriated for such renovations under Article 
31 of the Warrant for the 1986 Annual Town Meeting and remaining 
to be expended. 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 

appropriate a sum of money by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof 
for professional services and other expenses (i) with respect to 
traffic-related issues including but not limited to the widening 
of Winter Street and Old County Road, and (ii) in pursuit of any 
petition or claim on behalf of the Town for State payment or 
reimbursement of certain costs associated with the landfill 
closure, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of 
$85,000. from Free Cash for the costs of legal and other 
professional services and related expenses incurred by the Board 
of Selectmen (i) in evaluating and acting upon traffic-related 
issues within the Town, including but not limited to the Town's 
opposition to the widening of Winter Street and Old County Road, 
and (ii) pursuing any petition or claim on behalf of the Town 
for State payment or reimbursement of certain costs associated 
with the landfill closure. 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 

appropriate a sum of money by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof 
for the purchase and installation of a fire alarm system at the 
Department of Public Works, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of 
$7,000. from Free Cash for the purchase and installation of a 
fire alarm system at the Department of Public Works. 



35 



ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 

appropriate a sum of money by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof to 
conduct a study of the structural integrity, heating and 
electrical systems, space utilization and similar aspects of the 
Town's Public Safety Building, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of 
$15,000. from Free Cash to conduct a study of the structural 
integrity, heating and electrical systems, space utilization and 
similar aspects of the Town's Public Safety Building. 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 

appropriate a sum of money by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof 
for the purchase of emergency pre-emption devices to allow 
Lincoln's emergency vehicles to control the intersection at 
Route 2 and Bedford Road, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to appropriate the sum of 
$7,000. from Free Cash for the purchase of emergency pre-emption 
devices to allow Lincoln's emergency vehicles to control the 
intersection at Route 2 and Bedford Road. 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum 

of money from Free Cash to be added to monies 
previously appropriated for Elementary School Education under 
Article 5 of the Warrant for the 1987 Annual Town Meeting, or 
take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to appropriate for the purpose 
of public education the sum of $50,000., said sum to be taken 
from Free Cash, to be added to monies previously appropriated 
under Article 5, line item 509 "Programs with Other Systems", of 
the Warrant for the 1987 Annual Town Meeting. 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 

appropriate a sum of money by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof 
for the purposes of undertaking necessary remodeling and/or 
repairs to the Town's school buildings in order to improve 
access to handicapped persons, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to appropriate $10,183. from 
Free Cash for the purposes of undertaking necessary remodeling 
and/or repairs to the Town's school buildings in order to 
improve access to handicapped persons. 



36 



ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 

appropriate a sum of money by taxation, by transfer 

from available funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof to 

provide a one-day, Townwide hazardous waste collection, or take 

any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to appropriate $10,000. from 

Free Cash to provide a one-day, Townwide hazardous waste 

collection. 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will authorize the Board of 

Selectmen to petition the Massachusetts General 
Court to enact legislation that would authorize the collection 
by the Town of fees or charges on the transfer of real property, 
said monies to be used to acquire, maintain and preserve land 
for conservation and open space purposes and to acquire real 
property and implement programs for affordable housing, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: (By a standing vote of 99 in favor, 53 opposed) 

That the Town vote to authorize the Selectmen to 
petition the Massachusetts General Court for the enactment of 
special legislation encompassing so-called "landbank" 
provisions, which would: 

(a) authorize the collection by the Town from the 
seller of a land transfer fee not to exceed two 
percent (2%) of the purchase price upon the 
transfer of real property interests located in the 
Town, such fee to be set at one percent (1%) upon 
initial effectiveness of such legislation and 
thereafter to be subject to change from time to 
time, up to the amount of the aforesaid maximum 
fee, as may be provided by vote at town meeting; 

(b) establish a Conservation and Housing Fund (the 
"Fund") in the Town Treasury into which all land 
transfer fees shall be paid, with 25% of all 
amounts in such Fund to be allocated solely for 
conservation uses, 25% to be allocated solely for 
uses related to affordable housing, and the 
remaining 50% of all Fund amounts to be 
unrestricted as between conservation and affordable 
housing uses; 

(c) authorize the Town to use such portion of said Fund 
as is available from time to time for conservation 
use for programs or activities promoting 
conservation, including the purchase of real 
property interests for conservation purposes to be 
held by the town, the management and maintenance of 
conservation properties now or hereafter held, and 
related land use planning, subject to appropriation 
by town meeting; 



37 



(d) authorize the Town to use such portion of said Fund 
as is available from time to time for housing use 
for programs and activities promoting affordable 
housing, including the purchase of real property by 
the Town, the construction or rehabilitation of 
housing, the management and maintenance of housing 
and related properties now or hereafter identified 
and related land use planning, subject to 
appropriation by town meeting; 

(e) establish appropriate exemptions from the aforesaid 
land transfer fee for transactions such as 
transfers involving nominal or no consideration, 
trust or probate transfers or distributions, 
transfers between certain family members, transfers 
involving charitable or public agencies for one or 
more of the purposed to which the Fund can be 
devoted, and additional or alternative exemptions 
as are deemed appropriate by the Selectmen to 
include in such petition; 

(f) provide that the exercise of the authority granted 
in such legislation shall not be subject to the 
provisions of Section 21C of Chapter 59 of the 
Massachusetts General Laws; and 

(g) include such further provisions, including 
procedures for the collection and enforcement of 
the aforesaid land transfer fee, as the Selectmen 
may determine after consultation with the 
Conservation Commission, the Housing Commission and 
the Planning Board; 

provided , that such petition shall be subject to the 
condition that any such special legislation as adopted by 
the General Court shall, before becoming effective, be 
first submitted to and approved by a vote of a subsequent 
town meeting. 

An amendment to substitute the word "buyer" for "seller" in 
paragraph (a) was defeated. 

An amendment to change paragraph (b) to establish a fund to be 
expended at the direction of Town Meeting and eliminate 
paragraphs (c) and (d) was defeated. 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to amend its General 

Bylaws by adding a new Article entitled General 
Wetlands Protection Bylaw , to provide additional protection to 
Lincoln wetlands, a copy of the text of which proposed Article 
is on file with the Town Clerk, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 
VOTED: (Unanimously) 

To pass over the article. 



38 



ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 

appropriate a sum of money by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof to 
obtain engineering or other consultant services for a planning 
study of the Town's Water Distribution System and the 
administration of its Water Department, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 
VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town appropriate from Water Department 
receipts the sum of $30,000. to obtain engineering or other 
consultant services for a planning study of the Town's Water 
Distribution System and the administration of its Water 
Department . 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will appropriate all of the 

unexpended balance of the proceeds of a loan of 
$700,000 (approximately $2,225.00), which was originally 
borrowed, pursuant to a vote under Article 10 of the Warrant for 
the Special Town Meeting held on June 16, 1981, to construct a 
concrete reservoir at the location of the existing open water 
distribution reservoir off Bedford Road together with associated 
pipes, fixtures and other equipment, for the laying and 
re-laying of certain water mains, money for which may be 
borrowed under the provisions of Chapter 44 of the General Laws, 
or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (Unanimously) 

To pass over this article. 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 

appropriate a sum of money by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds, by borrowing or any combination thereof 
for the laying and/or re-laying of certain water mains along 
Route 2 in the areas of the intersections of Lexington Road, 
Page Road and Mill Street, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town appropriate from Water Department 
receipts the sum of $75,000. for the laying and/or relaying of 
certain water mains along Route 2 in the areas of the 
intersections of Lexington Road, Page Road and Mill Street. 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to accept Chapter 40, 

Section 8 G of the Massachusetts General Laws, 
which will allow the Town to enter into agreements with other 
cities and towns to provide mutual aid programs for police 
departments, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED: (Unanimously) 

That the Town vote to accept Chapter 40, Section 8 
G of the Massachusetts, General Laws, which will allow the Town 
to enter into agreements with other cities and towns to provide 
mutual aid programs for police departments, a copy of which law 
has been distributed to all persons at this meeting. 



39 



At various stages of the Meeting, tribute was paid as follows: 

March 26, 1988 was proclaimed "Diana Golden Day in 
Lincoln" for her accomplishments .as Female Disabled Skier 
of the Year and winner of the gold medal in the giant 
slalom for disabled skiers in the 1988 Winter Olympics. 

James DeNormandie who passed on in December. 

John Goodrich retiring from the Board of Selectmen after 3 
years. 

Elizabeth Twomey, Superintendent of Schools. 

Hamilton James retiring from the Finance Committee after 6 
years. 

Lynn Donaldson retiring from the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional 
School District Committee after 6 years. 

Warren F. Flint, Jr. leaving the Planning Board after 6 
years to become a Selectman. 

George Faddoul retiring from the Board of Health after 12 
years. 

Mary Helen Lorenz retiring from the Housing Commission 
after 6 years. 

During the lunch break the Lincoln Committee on the 
Bicentennial of the Constitution presented a "Meeting 
within a Meeting" in which the Town debated three possible 
Constitutional Amendments and unanimously voted to 
reaffirm the Constitution. 



There being no further business to come before the Meeting, it 
was moved, seconded and unanimously voted to dissolve the 
Meeting at 6:45 p.m. 



40 



ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION 
March 28, 1988 



In accordance with Article 1 of the Warrant for the Annual Town 
Meeting, the polls were declared open at 7:30 a.m. by Town 
Clerk, Nancy Zuelke. The following Wardens assisted Mrs. Zuelke 
throughout the day: Carol Caswell, Susan Fargo, Alice Garrison, 
William G. Langton, Elizabeth Snelling, Eleanor Wilfert, Fred J. 
Wilfert, and Laurence Zuelke. The polls were declared closed at 



8:00 p.m. by Mrs. 


Zuelke. There was a 


total vote 


of 715, with 


200 in Precinct 1 


and 515 in Precinct 2 


ui t-h 

, Hi 


Lilt 


lUlXUWll Ig 




roon "1 t"o • 
L co UlLo • 












Office 


Candidate 


Prec. 


1 


Prec. 2 


Total 


Tntm florlf ( 1 xrr \ 


NTo t» /■» \t T 7 1 1 /-v 1 L»- 
liclILL.y »J • ZjLlfci-Llvc 


177 




460 


637 




Blanks 


23 




55 


78 






200 




515 


715 


Board nf ^pl pclrnpn 


Warren F. Flint Jr 


174 




463 


637 


(3 yrs.) 


Blanks 


26 




52 


78 




200 




515 


715 


Town Trpfl<5urpr 


Rov M. Raia 


159 




425 


584 


(1 yr.) 


Blanks 


41 




90 


131 






200 




515 


715 


Board of Assessors 


Robert L. Jenal 


152 




405 


557 


(3 yrs.) 


Blanks 


48 




110 


158 






200 




515 


715 


School Committee 


Michaela M. Lipsey 


149 




403 


552 
~j -j i- 


(3 yrs. ) 


Blanks 


51 




112 


163 






200 




515 


715 


Water Commissioner 


Gabriel Farrell 


94 




21 5 

X-J 




(3 vrs. ) 


tidij. y n • i id u±c y 


65 




219 


284 




Blanks 


41 




81 


122 






200 




515 


715 


Board of Health 


Joan M. Comstock 


162 




422 


584 


(3 yrs.) 


Blanks 


38 




93 


131 






200 




515 


715 


Cemetery 


H. Arnold MacLean 


162 




424 


586 


Commissioner 


Blanks 


38 




91 


129 


(3 yrs.) 




200 




515 


715 


Cemetery 


Martha DeNormandie 


166 




445 


611 


Commissioner 


Blanks 


34 




70 


104 


(1 yr.) 




200 




515 


715 



41 



Office 


Candidate 


Prec. 1 


Prec. 2 Total 


Planning Board 


F. Douglas Adams 


154 


4±0 


tin 
3/ U 


v 3 yrs. ; 


DianKs 




99 


145 






200 


515 


715 


Planning Board 


Kenneth E. Bassett 


158 


air 


0/3 


(4 yrs . ) 


Rio t-i \r o 


A9 


97 


139 




200 


515 


715 


Commissioner of 


George C. Hibben 


159 


/■ 9 A 
4 ZD 




TVu cl- Fund c 


R 1 anVo 
DlduNo 


41 


89 


130 


(3 yrs.) 




200 


515 


715 


Trustee of Bemis 


W. Allen Rossiter 


164 


Al /■ 


3/o 


r una v,3 yrs.,/ 


Dxanics 


JQ 


101 


137 






200 


515 


715 


Trustee DeCordova 


Gregory G. Harney 


154 


ah^ 

4U3 


33 / 


iiuscuni \h yrs. ) 


Dxantcs 


Afi 


112 


158 




200 


515 


715 


Housing Commission 


Elizabeth Harrison 


156 


Al 7 


^71 
3 / J 


yrs. ) 


D±antcs 


AA 


98 


142 






200 


515 


715 


Recreation 


Peter Watkinson 


151 


A01 


559 
33Z 




Rl an V c 


A9 


114 


163 


(3 yrs.) 




200 


515 


715 


Lincoln-Sudbury 


Catherine B. Hanafi 


25 


65 


90 


Regional H.S. (2) 


William C. Hewins 


111 


301 


412 


(3 yrs.) 


Sarah Cannon Holden 


174 


Ao7 






Banks 


QO 


197 


287 






400 


1030 


1430 


Question 1 


"Shall the Town of : 


Lincoln be 


allowed to 






assess an additional $431,986.00 in real 






estate and personal property 


taxes for the 




purposes of funding the Town' 


s operating 






expenses for the fiscal year beginning July 




first, nineteen hundred and e 


ighty-eight? 






Yes 


108 


329 


437 




No 


84 


176 


260 




Blanks 


8 


10 


18 






200 


515 


715 



42 



Question 2 "Shall the Town of Lincoln be allowed to 

exempt from the provisions of proposition two 
and one-half, so-called, the amount required 
to pay for the bond issued in order to design 
and construct a permanent transfer station at 
the landfill site?" 





Prec. 1 


Prec. 2 


Total 


Yes 


130 


374 


504 


No 


59 


133 


192 


Blanks 


11 


8 


19 




200 


515 


715 



43 



STATE PRIMARY 
September 15, 1988 



Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the Polls were declared open 
at 7:00 a.m. by Nancy J. Zuelke, Town Clerk, who was assisted 
throughout the day by the following wardens: Nancy Braasch, 
Peggy Elliott, Eugenia Flint, William Langton, Karen Moss, 
Elizabeth Snelling, Fred Wilfert, and Laurence Zuelke. The 
Polls were declared closed at 8:00 p.m. by Mrs. Zuelke. The 
total number of votes cast was 468, which was divided as 
follows: Precinct 1: Republican - 24, Democratic - 73, for a 
total of 98; Precinct 2: Republican - 74, Democratic - 297, for 
a total of 370. 



Republican 



Office 


Candidate 


Prec. 1 


Prec. 2 


Total 


Senator in Congress 


Joseph D. Malone 


17 


65 


82 




Blanks 


7 


9 


16 






24 


74 


98 


Councillor 


Jody Dow 


17 


61 


78 




Blanks 


7 


13 


20 






24 


74 


98 


Senator in General 


Edward Rudnitsky 


19 


63 


82 


Ct. (5th Middlesex) 


Blanks 


5 


11 


16 






24 


74 


98 



44 



Democratic 



Office 


Candidate 


Prec. 1 


Prec. 2 


Tot 


Senator in Congress 


Edward M. Kennedy 


52 


243 


295 




Blanks 


21 


54 


75 






73 


297 


370 


Representative in 


Chester G. Atkins 


60 


239 


299 


Congress (5th Con- 


Blanks 


13 


58 


71 


gressional Dist.) 




73 


297 


370 


Councillor (3rd 


Herbert L. Connolly 


9A 


1 1 *! 
llJ 




Councillor Dist.) 


Robert B. Kennedy 


14 


68 


82 




Blanks 


35 


116 


151 






73 


297 


370 


Senator in General 


Carol C. Amick 


62 


269 


331 


Ct. (5th Middlesex) 


Blanks 


11 


28 


39 






73 


297 


370 


Representative in 


Stephen W. Doran 


43 


168 


211 


Gen. Ct. (15th 


Blanks 


30 


129 


159 


Rep Dist.) 




73 


297 


370 


Clerk of Courts 


Edward J. Sullivan 


34 


151 


185 


Middlesex County 


Blanks 


39 


146 


185 






73 


297 


370 


Register of Deeds 


Joseph L. Bradley 


8 


51 


59 


Middlesex County 


Eugene C. Brune 


16 


43 


59 




Janet T. Dever 




79 


Ql 




Thomas H. Fallon 


1 


14 


15 




Blanks 


29 


117 


146 






73 


297 


370 


County 


Thomas J. Larkin 


65 


264 


329 


Commissioner (2) 


Matthew Donahue 


11 


67 


78 


niQQiesex L.ount.y 


Edward J. Kennedy, Jr. 9 


9fi 






Joseph R. Macaluso 


4 


10 


14 




Blanks 


57 


227 


284 






146 


594 


740 


Treasurer Middlesex 


James E. Fahey, Jr. 


35 


144 


179 


County 


Blanks 


38 


153 


191 






73 


297 


370 


The total number of 


registered voters in 


Lincoln 


for this 





election was 3163. 



45 



A recount was held by the Lincoln Board of Registrars on 
September 26, 1988 at 10:00 am at the Town Offices pursuant to a 
petition for such recount. As determined by the recount, the 
votes cast for the office of Councillor in the Third District 
were as follows: 

Office Candidate Prec. 1 Prec. 2 Total 



Herbert L. Connolly 24 
Robert B. Kennedy 14 
Blanks 35 



113 
68 
115 
296 



137 
82 
150 
369 



73 



46 



STATE ELECTION 
November 8, 1988 



Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the Polls were declared open 
at 7:00 a.m. by Nancy J. Zuelke, Town Clerk, who was assisted 
throughout the day by the following wardens: Carol Caswell, 
Peggy Elliott, Eugenia Flint, Margaret Flint, Barbara Garrison, 
William Langton, Arnold MacLean, Elizabeth Snelling, Eleanor 
Wilfert, Fred Wilfert. The Polls were declared closed at 8:00 
p.m. by Mrs. Zuelke. There was a total vote of 3214, with 954 
in Precinct 1 and 2260 in Precinct 2, with the following results: 



Office 


Candidate 


Prec. 1 


Prec. 2 


Total 


rresiQent & vice 


Bush & Quayle 


A6^ 
'too 


£69 


1 ^9 S 


President 


Dukakis & Bent sen 


448 


1314 


1762 




Fulani & Dattner 


2 


7 


9 




Paul & Marrou 


15 


32 


47 




Scattering 




5 


5 




Rio riV c 
D-Ld.ILis.fc> 


96 


40 








954 


2260 


3214 


Senator in Congress 


Edward M. Kennedy 


502 


1394 


1896 




Joseph D. Malone 


415 


783 


1198 




Ma tt\t Vr1 A 1 a\r 
i la. Ly r l iiiicy 


-f 


u 


1 3 

j ) 




Freda Lee Nason 


8 


19 


27 




Blanks 


24 


56 


80 






954 


2260 


3214 


tvep resell to. Live m 


L»iiesuer vj. niKins 


7^1 


1 7ft^ 
1 / OJ 


9 SI A 


Congress (5th 


T. David Hudson 


117 


249 


366 


District) 


Blanks 


106 


228 


334 






954 


2260 


3214 


POLITIC lllOi 


jo ay uovf 


A7S 


1 OftQ 
±\JOy 


1 S6A 


(3rd Dist.) 


Robert B. Kennedy 


328 


842 


1170 




Blanks 


151 


329 


480 






954 


2260 


3214 


Senator in General 


Carol C. Amick 


588 


1519 


2107 


Court (5th 


Edward Rudnitsky 


289 


579 


868 


Middlesex Dist.) 


Blanks 


77 


162 


239 






954 


2260 


3214 


Representative in 


Stephen W. Doran 


451 


1186 


1637 


General Court 


Joseph A. Campbell 


324 


663 


987 


(15th Middlesex 


Blanks 


179 


411 


590 


Dist.) 




954 


2260 


3214 


Clerk of Courts 


Edward J. Sullivan 


622 


1443 


2065 


(Middlesex County) 


Blanks 


332 


817 


1149 






954 


2260 


3214 



47 



Office 


Candidate 


Prec. 1 


Prec. 2 


Total 


Register of Deeds 


Eugene C. Brune 


614 


1410 


2024 


(Middlesex Southern 


D-LanKS 




OJU 


1 1 on 


Dist.) 




954 


2260 


3214 


County Commissioner 


Thomas J. Larkin 


550 


1392 


1942 


(Middlesex County) 


Edward J. Kennedy Jr 


314 


718 


1032 




OlaQKo 


1 044 










1908 


4520 


6428 


County Treasurer 


James E. Fahey, Jr. 


592 


1377 


1969 


(Middlesex County) 


Blanks 


362 


883 


1245 






954 


2260 


3214 



Question 1 REFERENDUM PETITION ON AN EXISTING LAW 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, which was approved by 
the House of Representatives on May 20, 1987, by a vote of 93 - 
58, and approved by the Senate on May 20, 1987, by a vote of 
31 - 8? 



SUMMARY 

The law provides a salary increase, effective January 7, 1987, 
for the members of the legislature and certain constitutional 
officers of the Commonwealth. 

Beginning at a base salary of $30,000, each member of the 
legislature will receive a salary increase under the law equal 
to the compounded percentage increase in the salaries of full 
time state employees who are subject to collective bargaining 
agreements between the Commonwealth and the ALLIANCE, AFSCME - 
SEIU, AFL - CIO in effect between January 5, 1983 and January 7, 
1987. Thereafter the salaries of each member of the legislature 
will be increased by the same percentages as the salaries of 
full time state employees subject to the collective bargaining 
agreements. 

The law further provides that members of the legislature holding 
leadership positions and committee chairmanships will receive an 
annual sum in addition to their salary. This additional amount 
will vary from $7,500 to $35,000 depending upon the particular 
position the member holds. 

The law also increases the salaries of certain constitutional 
officers. Under the law the salary of the governor is set at 
$85,000; the salaries of the lieutenant governor, state 
secretary, state treasurer and the state auditor are set at 
$70,000; and the salary of the attorney general is set at 
$75,000. 



48 



Any individual may waive his or her salary increase under this 
law. Any amount so waived shall not be deemed regular 
compensation for the purposes of computing any such person's 
benefits and shall be exempt from state taxation. 





Prec. 1 


Prec. 2 


Total 


Yes 


246 


708 


954 


No 


664 


1457 


2121 


Blanks 


44 


95 


139 




954 


2260 


3214 



Question 2 LAW PROPOSED BY INITIATIVE PETITION 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, which was disapproved 
by the House of Representatives on May 3, 1988, by a vote of 
24 - 123, and on which no vote was taken by the Senate before 
May 4, 1987 

SUMMARY 

The proposed law would repeal state law requiring that the 
wages, including payments to health and welfare plans, paid to 
persons employed in the construction of public works be no less 
than the wages paid locally under existing collective bargaining 
agreements and understandings, or by the municipality, for the 
same kind of work. Under the proposed law, the Commissioner of 
Labor and Industries would no longer set wage rates for such 
work or classify jobs. 

The proposed law would also remove the Commissioner of Labor and 
Industries' authority to set the wage rates of employees of 
contractors who move office furniture and fixtures for the state 
or a county, city, town or district, and remove the 
Commissioner's authority to set the wage rates of operators of 
vehicles and other equipment engaged in public works. 

The proposed law would not change the way wages are set for 
laborers employed by the State Department of Public Works and 
the Metropolitan District Commission. 





Prec. 1 


Prec. 2 


Total 


Yes 


571 


1342 


1913 


No 


352 


843 


1195 


Blanks 


31 


75 


106 




954 


2260 


3214 



49 



Question 3 



LAW PROPOSED BY INITIATIVE PETITION 



Do you approve of a law summarized below, which was disapproved 
by the House of Representative on May 2, 1988, by a vote of 2 - 
150, and disapproved by the Senate on May 3, 1988, by a vote of 
- 34? 



The proposed law would require the Commissioner of the 
Department of Food and Agriculture to issue regulations to 
ensure that farm animals are maintained in good health and that 
cruel or inhumane practices are not used in the raising, 
handling or transportation of farm animals. 

The Commissioner would issue regulations, effective within four 
years after passage of the proposed law, about the surgical 
procedures used on farm animals, the transportation and 
slaughter of farm animals, and the diet and housing of those 
animals. The Director of the Division of Animal Health could 
issue exemption permits for a period of time up to one year and 
one half to any farmer . 

Under the proposed measure, an unpaid Scientific Advisory Board 
on Farm Animal Welfare comprised of veterinarians and animal 
scientists would also be established within the Department of 
Food and Agriculture. The Board would examine animal 
agricultural practices, issue for publication certain reports on 
farm practices, and make non-binding recommendations to the 
Commissioner about specific regulations. If appropriated by the 
legislature, the Board may allocate an annual sum of not more 
than ten cents per Massachusetts citizen to assist farmers in 
adopting methods which are consistent with the purposes of this 
law. 

The Director of the Division of Animal Health would be 
responsible for enforcing regulations issued as a result of this 
proposed law. Persons who violate the new law would be punished 
by a fine of up to $1,000. 



SUMMARY 



Prec. 1 



Prec. 2 



Total 



Yes 
No 

Blanks 



204 
713 
37 
954 



471 
1729 



675 
2442 



60 

2260 



97 
3214 



50 



Question 4 



LAW PROPOSED BY INITIATIVE PETITION 



Do you approve of a law summarized below, upon which no vote was 
taken by the House of Representatives or the Senate before May 
4, 1988? 

SUMMARY 

The proposed law would provide that, after July 4, 1989, there 
shall be no further generation of electric power by commercial 
nuclear power plants in the Comonwealth by means which result in 
the production of nuclear waste. 





Prec. 1 


Prec. 2 


Total 


Yes 


268 


811 


1079 


No 


590 


1186 


1776 


Blanks 


96 


263 


359 




954 


2260 


3214 



The total number of registered voters in Lincoln for this 
election was 3492. 



51 



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53 



OUTSTANDING DEBT AT JUNE 30, 1988 

Conservation Land Loan, 4.65%, due $20,000 each 
April 1, 1989-93, issued under Ch. 44, S. 7(3) of 
the G. L. 

Codman Complex Loan, 5.50%, due $5,000 Sept. 15, 
1988. 

Energy Conservation Loan, 7.80%, due $25,000 Dec. 1, 
1988, and due $20,000 each Dec. 1, 1989-91, issued 
under Ch. 44, S. 7(3) of the G. L. 
Conservation Land Loan, 7.25%, due $150,000 each 
April 1, 1989-94, issued under Ch. 44, S. 7(3) of 
the G. L. 

Codman Housing Loan, 7.25%, due $10,000 each April 1, 
1989-94, issued under Ch. 359, Acts of 1979 of the 
G.L. 

Conservation Land Loan, 7.60%, due $80,000 each Nov. 
15, 1988-89 and due $75,000 each Nov. 15, 1990-94, 
issued under Ch. 44, S. 7(3) of the G.L. 
General Obligation Bonds, 5.7696%, due $400,000 each 
March 15, 1989-96, and due $370,000 March 15, 1997, 
and due $250,000 March 15, 1998, issued under Ch. 
44, S. 7(3) and (3A) and 7(25), and Ch. 359 of the 
Acts of 1979, S. 3 of the G.L. 

Highway Sweeper Loan, 6.25%, due $15,000 each April 
15, 1989-91, and due $10,000 each April 15, 1992-93, 
issued under Ch. 44, S. 7(9). 

TOTAL MUNICIPAL LOANS 

NET DEBT 



Water Loan, 5.20%, due $15,000 each August 1, 
1988-90, and due $10,000 Aug. 1, 1991, issued under 
Ch.44,S.8(5). 

Water Loan, 4.65%, due $15,000 each April 1, 
1980-90, issued under Ch. 44, S. 8(5). 
Water Loan, 7.80%, due $90,000 each Dec. 1, 1988, 
and due $80,000 each Dec. 1, 1989-94. 



TOTAL WATER BONDS 



TOTAL DEBT (BONDED) 



54 



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63 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 



Robert L. Jenal 
Paul E. Marsh 

Douglas M. Burckett, Chairman 

Once again, the procedures and valuations of the Board of 
Assessors have been certified by the Commonwealth's Department 
of Revenue. Last year, the Department decided that Lincoln 
should participate in its experimental 'fast-track' 
recertif ication process which, on account of disarray in Boston, 
caused our tax bills to go out two months later than usual. 

Many residents were astonished and irate to note on those 
bills that 1989 valuations on their property had gone up when 
there were more For Sale signs in Town than ever and rumors 
abounded of sellers settling for less than their asking price. 
Despite what happened to valuations, the Town's total tax 
burden, up 21% over Fiscal Year 1988, has to be met. Willy-nilly 
individual tax bills would have come out about the same, if not 
in part by increase in valuations then by even greater increase 
in the tax rate. Due to this abnormal increase in tax dollars 
and the misunderstanding of the situation by many, the Board has 
received about three times the normal number of abatement 
applications. Much of the reason is constitutional: the new 
valuations are as of 1 January, 1988 and reflect the performance 
of the real estate market in Lincoln during the preceding twelve 
months. In calendar 1987 the real estate boom was only just 
beginning to wind down: The number of sales was decreasing but 
selling prices were still robust. The Board's valuations lag 
behind what one senses the real estate market to be doing at 
this moment and there is nothing to be done about it short of 
changing the law. 

Further, the purpose of the abatement process is to make 
sure that the values assigned to properties are based on 
accurate information about the property and are fair and 
evenhanded throughout the town. That is why all values are set 
as of 1 January and applications for abatement are accepted only 
at the fall billing — the one when new valuations are 
published. So long as the Board is satisfied that its 
calculation of values of property is accurate and treats 
comparable properties equally, it is obliged to deny an 
abatement. 

The Board takes no pleasure at all in imposing heavy tax 
burdens on individuals even if the procedure is well-informed 
and fair. But the complete system of taxing property provides 
specific (but modest) means of relief for what is, in fact, a 
common, constant, and universal problem. The means is the 
exemption, a way of reducing the property tax burden on property 
owners who have certain specified personal characxteri sties. 



64 



Disabled veterans, the blind, and some property owners mostly 
over the age of 70 may, by giving evidence of certain additional 
characteristics, qualify for reductions in their property 
taxes. Our office has the particulars and the forms needed for 
application. The Board wants to stress that there is nothing to 
be ashamed of in seeking and getting an exemption. It is an 
essential and traditional device for dealing with a weakness in 
the property-taxing system, not a reflection on an individual. 

Items of assessing regulations you should be familiar with: 

1) The status of property on January 1 is the 
determinant of its value in any year. 

2) All real estate and personal tax abatement 
applications must be filed with the Board by 
October 1 of the year involved or within 30 days 
after the date of mailing of the tax bill. 

3) Motor vehicle and trailer excise tax abatement 
applications must be filed with the Board by 
December 31 of the year succeeding the year 
involved. If cars are changed during the year, it 
is the taxpayer's responsibility to file an abate- 
ment application. 

4) Chapter 59, Section 5, Clause 41 of the General 
Laws, as amended, provides for certain real estate 
tax exemptions for taxpayers who meet certain age, 
financial, etc., qualifications. Additional 
information may be obtained from the Assessors' 
Office. All applications under Clause 41 must be 
filed by December 15 of the year involved. 

5) Chapter 59, Section 5, Clause 41A provides for the 
deferral of real estate tax payments in certain 
instances. Additional information may be obtained 
from the Assessors' Office. All applications 
under this clause must be filed by December 15 of 
the year involved. 

6) Veterans with 10% or more disability, holders of 
Purple Heart awards, and others, may qualify for a 
partial exemption. Additional information may be 
obtained from the Assessors' Office. 



65 



1988-89 RECAPITULATION 



Amount to be raised by Taxation 



7,288,799.98 



Valuation and Tax Rate 

Real Estate 

Residential 

Open Space 

Commercial 

Industrial 
Personal Property 
Total Valuation 



707,326,700 
18,502,500 

9,265,600 

- - 

8,660,300 
743,755,100 



Tax Rate per Thousand (1987-88) $9.80 
School rate $4.11 
General rate $5.69 



REAL ESTATE SUMMARY 



Property Description 
Residential-single 
dwelling unit 

Condominiums 

Residential - two or 
more dwelling units 

Part commercial / 
Part residential 

Commercial 

Land classified under Ch 61, 
61A, & 61B 

Agricultural, 

Forest, or 

Recreational 

Conservation Restriction 
Vacant Land 



No. of Parcels 



1392 

188 
7 



18 

16 

79 
253 



Assessed Value 
Jan. 1, 1988 
624,275,900 



55,453,100 
12,509,900 

1,476,500 

7,967,700 

2,098,100 

1,650,400 
28,441,700 



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Protection of Persons and Property 



FIRE AND POLICE DEPARTMENT 



D. James Arena, Chief 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



The following is a report of activites of the Lincoln 
Police Department for the year 1988; comparison figures are 
shown for 1987: 



Motor Vehicle Enforcement and Investigations: 



1988 1987 

Accidents investigated 302 415 

Accidents with injury 128 120 

Fatal accidents 2 1 

Traffic citations issued 1,113 923 



Criminal Law Enforcement and Investigations: 



Crimes reported and investigated: 






Break and entry 


16 


22 


Larceny 


60 


80 


Stolen cars, bikes 


8 


14 


Narcotic law violations 


7 


12 


Town Ordinance violations 


50 


49 


Vandalism 


36 


60 


Disturbances 


103 


89 


Domestic disputes/civil problems 


50/48 


26/69 


Reports of attempted crimes 


9 


7 


Non-classified responses 


52 


63 


Arrests, motor vehicle 


136 


122 



and criminal 



Miscellaneous Activities: 



Response to alarms 


671 


644 


Suspicious activity reports 


47 


60 


Animal complaints 


176 


135 


Ambulance runs 


341 


315 


Assists to other police agencies 


104 


86 


Total calls logged at desk 


13,088 


13,563 



69 



I am pleased to report that there was a marked decrease in 
the area of major criminal activities and a drop in accidents 
which Qould be related to the increase in motor vehicle 
citations. Traffic problems continue to be the main cause of 
complaints received by our Department and as the number of 
vehicles passing over our roads increase, the related problems 
will also. 

In an effort to ensure compliance with regulations 
concerning in-service training of police officers, I have 
proposed a line item on our 1989/90 budget to cover these costs; 
hopefully it will be approved. Money was also appropriated last 
year for a study of our building needs and hopefully 1989 will 
see some movement in the direction of addressing those factors. 
Additionally, a Public Safety Study Committee has been working 
on the current and future needs of the Public Safety Departments 
in the Town and we expect proposals from that group soon. 

During the year we suffered a tragic loss with the serious 
injury to Special Officer Harold Leary who was struck by a 
vehicle while on traffic duty on Route 2. Officer Leary remains 
in a coma at this time and our prayers are with him for 
recovery. Also during the year a five year veteran of our 
Department, Officer David Eysie, resigned to join the Norwood 
Police Department. He was replaced on our roster by Officer 
Barbara Bardsley, a former officer with our department who 
returned to the fold. 

In closing we once again express our appreciation to our 
fellow Town workers and to the community in general for their 
cooperation and support. 



70 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



The following is a report of the activities of the Lincoln Fire 
Department for the year 1988; comparison figures are shown for 
the year 1987: 



Apparat 



Other 





1988 


1987 


:us Runs: 






Response to motor vehicle accidents 


152 


160 


Airport runs (Hanscom) 


104 


56 


Ambulance calls 


341 


315 


Brush fires 


26 


16 


Building fires 


10 


6 


Box alarms received 


73 


67 


False alarms received (home alarms, etc) 


101 


109 


Investigations 


142 


100 


Lock-outs (vehicle & property) 


163 


165 


Car fires 


13 


22 


Requests for mutual aid 


78 


53 


Reports of outside burning checked 


16 


13 


Water problems 


20 


67 


Reports of wires down and/or arcing 


26 


32 


activities : 






Burning permits issued 


613 


694 


Fire alarm boxes tested 


85 


54 


School fire drills 


6 


13 


Inspections: Schools 




10 


Mercantile buildings 


7 


12 


Town buildings 


3 


4 


Smoke detectors 


97 


90 


Wood stoves 


12 


18 


Courtesy inspections 


1 




Oil burner/ tanks 


17 


20 


Fire alarms 


4 


5 


Fire prevention 


28 


10 



The Department continues to solicit involvement from any 
interested citizens willing to give time and effort to train as 
Call Firefighters. Our training of both regulars and call men 
continues on a level required to keep the department at full 
readiness although we have found some problems in maintiaining a 
full contingent of manpower. 

As mentioned in the Police Report, there is a current Study 
Committee in session to address the present and future needs of 
the department and the community with regard to Public Safety; 
hopefully as a result of their recommendations we will make 
strides in that direction. 



71 



Early in the year Firefighter Donald Bardsley resigned to 
join the Weston Fire Department; he was replaced by Paul 
Domenichella who had previously served on our call department. 
We also took the time during the year to honor three long time 
members of the call department who retired: Call Deputy William 
Doherty, Call Captain William Dean and Call Lieutenant Joseph 
Cotoni, Sr.; we owe them praise for their long and dedicated 
years of service. 

In closing, our appreciation to our fellow Town employees 
and the citizens of the community for their support and 
cooperation. 



PARKING CLERK 

Lorraine Dean 

Number of tickets issued: 99 
Fines paid: 66 
Fines unpaid: 33 

Percentage paid (approximately): 67% 

Total money taken in for the year 1988 $330.00 



72 



CIVIL DEFENSE AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS 



Thomas B. Moran, Director 

The Lincoln Civil Defense and Emergency Preparedness 
organization provides a link to the State Civil Defense for 
physical and fiscal assistance in preparing for and responding 
to emergencies. At the local level we maintain a roster of 
local people and their skills who can help during emergencies. 
We presently have over 20 people on our roster; we welcome 
others. 

An active part of the Lincoln effort has been conducted by 
Communications Officer Curtis Risley and his assistant John 
Solman. Lincoln continues to be the Sector 1C net control 
station managing an amateur radio network that links 16 
neighboring towns to each other and to the Sector headquarters 
in Tewksbury. We have also assisted our neighbors in Waltham 
with the Sector IB net. We continue to hold our bi-monthly nets 
among the Lincoln amateur radio operators on the first and third 
Mondays of the month. 

As a part of our emergency planning effort, we encourage and 
support community service activities by our volunteers. This 
year our volunteers assisted the Project Bread's "Walk for 
Hunger" as well as the Honeywell Marathon in Lexington with 
their portable and mobile radio units. We welcome requests for 
communications assistance for such events. 

Radio License classes and practical training in the radio 
art continue to be a part of our program. We plan to repeat our 
Novice license class in the near future. It will include some 
"hands on training" in radio operating practice. Please contact 
Curt or John for information on the classes. 

A significant project among our volunteers during the past 
year has been the construction of a radio repeater in the 220 
MHz band. The repeater has been in operation since November and 
provides excellent coverage of Lincoln and the surrounding 
area. The unit has a battery backup for several days of 
operation during a power outage. 

A major reason for constructing the repeater was to permit 
us to include Novice operators in our radio nets and public 
service activities, using their voice radios. We are pleased 
with their participation and response. 

As we mentioned in last year's report, this unit has been 

constructed by donations of materials, equipment and volunteer 

time. A recent estimate of the value of a comparable unit is 
well over $1,000. 



73 



We would like to thank the following individuals for their 
generous contributions to the success of the project: 
Curt Risley for design and construction of the receivers and 
transmitter; John Solman for system assembly and test; Andrew 
Donovan for the battery, power supply, copper DWV pipe and test 
equipment; William and Diana Ryan for machining of cavity filter 
parts; Fred Hopengarten for coaxial cable and connectors; 
Russell Dixon for copper pipe; Eric Williams for the loan of 
equipment; John Klobuchar for connectors; Boston Edison and the 
Lincoln Fire Department for hardware; James Henderson and 
Robert Fraser for assembly work and Officer Thomas Moran for 
planning and other assistance. 



74 



PUBLIC SAFETY STUDY COMMITTEE 



D. James Arena 
Allen Bowles 
Richard Goddard 
David W. Ramsay 
Edward Rolfe 
Donald A. Seckler 
Michael Tennican 



The Public Safety Study Committee was established according 
to a charge by the Selectmen to assess the present state of 
public safety services in terms of personnel, facilities, and 
equipment, and to relate those findings to both the present 
mission of the public safety services and the demands likely to 
be placed upon them by changes which may arise within the next 
decade. The Committee has been meeting regularly since 
September to define the issues and gather data sufficient to 
permit it to carry out the terms of the charge. With the 
energetic and professional assistance of Chief Arena, Captain 
Goddard and Inspector Bowles, the public safety members of the 
Committee, reports have been compiled which detail such matters 
as patterns in use of overtime by police and fire services, run 
times for fire and ambulance apparatus from the station to 
various points in Town under present and projected road 
configurations, and patterns of reponse to emergencies under 
mutual assistance programs with neighboring towns. A survey of 
call fire personnel has been undertaken to examine the whole 
matter of fire service staffing under the call service system. 
The findings of these, and other reports, are assembled in an 
interim report which details those recommendations which can be 
specified and acted upon within the current fiscal period. 



75 



BUILDING DEPARTMENT 



Ernest Johnson, Building Commissioner 

Courtney Atkinson, Assistant Wiring and Building Inspector 

Kenneth Desmond, Electrical and Fire Alarm Inspector 

Russell J. Dixon, Plumbing and Gas Inspector 

Russell J. Dixon, Jr., Assistant Plumbing and Gas Inspector 

James Sullivan, Assistant Plumbing and Gas Inspector 

Earl Midgeley, Special Assistant to the Buiilding Commissioner 

Jane Barnet, Administrative Assistant 



Battle Road Farm, the North Lincoln housing development is 
now well underway with the construction of Phase #1. This 
includes forty units plus the sanitary treatment plant. We are 
presently very pleased with the progress and the contractors. 
Anyone interested in ownership should call 259-0606 for market 
value units, 259-0550 for general questions, and for the low 
income units which will be sold by lottery write to: Lottery, 
Box 672, Lincoln, Ma. 

Cranberry Hill Associates' large office complex, Lincoln 
North, next to Battle Road Farm is also well underway. This is 
a very well organized operation thanks to the leadership of 
Cranberry Hill Associates president, Larry Smith. 

The addition to the library was slow getting out of the 
foundation stages due to a considerable amount of ledge 
encountered during excavations. Now it is really taking shape. 
Workmanship to date is excellent. 

The statistics listed below clearly indicate what a busy 
year it has been for the Building Department. 

Values as submitted by applicants — 



Building 
Plumbing 
Electrical 



$22,589,815.00 
409,650.00 
276,625.00 



Permits issued — 

New Residential 

Library Addition 

Additions and Remodeling 

Garages, Sheds, Barns 

Swimming Pools 

Greenhouses 

Reroof ing 

Tents (temporary) 

Signs 

Woodburning Stoves 
Fences 

Recertif ication of Buildings 
Tennis Courts 



16 
1 
75 
20 
6 
3 
18 
17 
3 
7 
5 
7 
2 



76 



Accessory Apartments 2 

Battle Road Farm Condominiums 40 

Battle Road Farm Treatment Plant 1 

Office Building, Lincoln North 1 

Total 224 

Permit fees collected — 

Building $96,271 

Plumbing 11,651 

Electrical 31,289 

Fire Alarms 2,760 

Woodburning Stoves 150 

Recertifications 390 

Total 4142,511 



77 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 



Ernest L. Johnson 

The General Laws of Massachusetts requires that all devices used 
for weighing or measuring commodities be accurately checked and 
certified by "SEALS" at least once each year. 

For the period commencing January 1, 1988, and ending 
December 31, 1988, inclusive, in compliance with Section 37, 
Chapter 98, General Laws as amended, the following number of 
devices have been certified: 

Scales sealed 17 
Gasoline meters seals 32 



Scales and gasoline pumps not sealed require repairs or 
adjustments. 

Any questions regarding weights and measures should be 
submitted to the Sealer of Weights and Measures at the Town 
Offices Building. 



Total 



49 



Sealing fees collected 



$366.00 



78 



Health and Welfare 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



Dr. Perry Culver, Chairman 

Dr. John O'Loughlin, Vice-Chairman 

Joan Comstock, R.N., Secretary 

Agents for the Board: 

Jane Barnet, Administrative Assistant 
Frank C. Emmons, Engineer 
John J. Devine, Sanitarian 
Jane Barnet, Animal Inspector 



Local Boards of Health in Massachusetts are required by 
state statutes and regulations to perform many important and 
crucial duties relative to the protection of public health, the 
control of disease, the promotion of sanitary living conditions, 
and the protection of the environment from damage and 
pollution. In addition to required duties, local boards of 
health are authorized to promulgate supplemental regulations 
which extend the Boards' authority over a broad range of health, 
sanitation, and environmental problems. These requirements 
reflect the Legislature's understanding that many critical 
health problems are best handled by the involvement of local 
community officials familiar with local conditions. 

The Board of Health meets once monthly and more often if needed. 

Reports of Board Activities 

1. Enforcement of Title V of the State Environmental Code: 

This included conducting examinations of sites for sewage 
and septage disposal, issuing permits, inspecting and approving 
installation of equipment, holding hearings, granting variances, 
etc. The total amount of fees collected for the year was 
$20,730.00. Summary of activities is as follows: 



Site investigations witnessed (i.e., percolation 

tests and test pits) 69 

New disposal systems inspected and approved 29 

Repaired disposal systems inspected and approved 12 

Systems investigated for accessory apartments 2 

Installers permits issued 14 
Septage handlers equipment inspected and licenses 

issued 5 



79 



2. Sanitarian Inspections: 

Sanitarian John Devine helped the Board enforce local 
health regulations according to Chapter X of the State Sanitary 
Code. Regular inspections of food service establishments in 
Lincoln were performed during the year including restaurants and 
food service facilities in stores, schools, institutions, farm 
stands, as well as several facilities at Hanscom Field, namely 
Hanscom Middle School cafeteria, Kustom Katering, Professional 
Chef and Flight 88 and permits were issued. The Codman Pool and 
bathhouse were also inspected by the Sanitarian as were the 
three day camps and Farrington Memorial. In addition, the 
Sanitarian is responsible for investigating houses used as 
dormitories for handicapped individuals. Complaints from 
citizens of possible food contamination are also investigated by 
the Sanitarian. 

3. School Health Program: 

The school health program aims to promote and protect the 
health of students, and encourage the development of healthy 
lifestyles. The services provide for early identification of 
illness or injuries, emergency treatment, and prompt referral to 
a medical facility as necessary. This fall many students 
contacted head lice keeping the nurse and aides very busy, this 
in addition to their regular duties. The health services at the 
schools are provided through a contractural arrangement with 
Emerson Hospital Home Care. Director of Pupil Services, Lois 
Taylor, is also in close coordination with the health program. 

Personnel with assigned responsibilities are as follows: 

Denise Sheeran, Director, Emerson Home Care Services 

Kathy Smyers, School Nurse 

Anne Mahoney, School Health Aide 

Toby Nathan, M.D., School Physician 

4. Emerson Hospital Home Care Service: 

Emerson Hospital Home Care Service is a Medicare certified 
provider of home health care. The services include: nursing, 
physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy, medical 
social service and home health aides. Lincoln budgeted $1,500 
for these services. 

This year home visits numbered six as opposed to 
twenty-three last year. Telephone communications have been 
substituted whenever circumstances permit. The Department 
provided 799 hours to the school nurse program (590 hours in 
1987) and supervised the annual influenza innoculation program 
for the Council on Aging where 172 individuals received the flu 
vaccine . 



80 



5. Summary of Eliot Community Mental Health Center Activities: 

This facility provides services to Lincoln residents and 
includes an outpatient clinic, and geriatric, mental 
retardation, and therapeutic preschool programs. The 
out-patient department served forty Lincoln residents with a 
total of 150 visits. The Day Treatment Center served five 
Lincoln residents for a total of 150 visits. The Crisis Center 
responded to 129 calls from Lincoln and the Therapeutic Primary 
Treatment center had three children enrolled from Lincoln. 
Nine towns participate in funding these services and Lincoln's 
contribution to the Mental Health Center in 1988 was $6,500. 

6. Report of the East Middlesex Mosquito Control Project: 

The East Middlesex Mosquito Control Project conducts a 
program in Lincoln consisting of mosquito and wetland 
surveillance, water management and public education. 

The goal of the surveillance program is to target mosquito 
breeding areas and to monitor changes in the adult mosquito 
population. Adult mosquito populations are determined regularly 
at three sites around the town. These data aid the Project in 
determining the need for control. The State Department of 
Public Health utilizes some of these data to monitor those 
species associated with Eastern Equine Encephalitis. 

Water management is primarily a ditch maintenance 
operation. In 1988 a 240 foot segment of ditch adjacent to 
Sniderwood Way was cleared. Project personnel continued to 
inspect and improve ditches which have been maintained since 
1983. 

The project expanded its public education program with the 
production of several educational movies available to local 
schools and groups within the town. There were also educational 
pamphlets available through the Board of Health. In March 1988 
the Project hosted a mosquito control project for town 
officials. The workshop provided information about proper 
construction of storm water retention and detention areas to 
minimize new mosquito breeding areas. 

7. Summary of Animal Inspector's Activities: 

The animal inspector's responsibilities are to supply the 
Massachusetts Department of Food and Agriculture, Division of 
Animal Health, with a list of animal owners, the number of 
livestock, and general health of animals in the town. A 
compilation of the 1988 animal census is as follows: 

Number of Dairy Herds (one animal constitutes a herd 13 



Number of Beef Herds ( " ") 17 

Number of Horses 65 

Number of Ponies 13 

Number of Goats 4 

Number of Sheep 109 

Number of Swine 12 



81 



If complaints arise with regard to the health or care of 
any livestock, the animal inspector investigates the 
circumstances in accordance with laws and regulations relating 
to animal health. 

8. Rabies Clinic: 

Each spring the Board sponsors a rabies clinic for dogs 
owned by Lincoln residents. In 1988 35 dogs were vaccinated 
against rabies during clinic hours held on May 21st at the Town 
Barn. Dr. Gardiner Kenneson of Acton administered the 
innoculations. All dogs vaccinated between 3-12 months of age 
last year should be vaccinated again this year. A booster shot 
is then recommended every three years. Pet owners should 
consult with their veterinarian about the need of rabies and 
feline leukemia immunization for cats. 

9. Transfer Station: 

Having secured D.E.Q.E. approval, the Town received bids 
and awarded a contract for landfill closure to the low bidder, 
Pitt Construction Co. of Woburn, Mass. 

Once earth moving commenced, a substantial volume of 
buried waste was discovered in an area that was believed to be 
waste-free. The time and effort required to clear this area was 
sufficient to delay an already critical construction schedule. 
Accordingly, as the adversities of winter weather might 
seriously jeopardize placing of the final cap, construction has 
been temporarily suspended until the spring. 

Upon receipt of conceptual approval by the Town Solid 
Waste Committee the Town's engineers have prepared contract 
plans and specifications for upgrading of Lincoln Solid Waste 
Transfer Station. Most of the present facility and equipment 
are integrated into the new plan which includes a new, versatile 
recycling area. The plans have been submitted to D.E.Q.E. for 
approval and will be advertised for bid upon receipt of approval. 

10. Miscellaneous: 

After nine years of devoted service to the Board of Health 
George Faddoul, DVM, a distinguished expert on avian influenza 
infection and our local guru on equine encephalitis, expressed 
his desire to retire. In addition to his expertise George 
brought to the Board his wisdom and balanced judgement which led 
to happy solutions to many difficult problems. 

Joan Comstock, R.N. , formerly a member of the Board from 

1972 to 1975, was elected to the Board of Health. She brings 

with her the knowledge, experience and point of view of a 
registered nurse. 



82 



There are on-going concerns of the Board which have not 
been adequately addressed: 

A. Continued development of new housing on lands of 
marginal quality presents threats to the preservation of the 
purity of ground water and aquifers. 

B. The existence of underground storage tanks for oil and 
gasoline presents an on-going threat for pollution. A complete 
survey and testing of all of these tanks must be undertaken. 

C. The citizens with private wells are responsible for 
ascertaining and maintaining the quality and purity of their 
water supplies. The Board of Health has no legal 
responsibilities in this regard but offers its services to 
provide information about reliable sources of water testing. 
Identification and location of all private wells would help the 
town to prevent pollution of private wells from roadside and 
right-of-way spraying. 

D. The Board of Health steadfastly supports the activation 
of regular hazardous waste collection days and encourages all 
interested boards and committees to push for rapid development 
of the habit of recycling solid waste materials. 



83 



COUNCIL ON AGING 



Charlotte Barnaby 
Bob Brown 
Sally Chandler 
Marian Cook 
Shirley Drew 
B. Grim 

Sally Mansfield 

Ruth Morey, Vice Chairman 

Anne Satterfield 

Peggy Schmertzler, Secretary/Treasurer 
Aire-Maija Schwann 
William Davis, Chairman 

Ruth Kramer, Director 

Rhoda Presti, Assistant to the Director 



The Council on Aging has experienced a busy year with 
activities and programs designed for the needs of our elder 
citizens. There were monthly clinics for blood pressure, 
podia trie care and an annual Flu Immunization Clinic, all of 
which were well attended. Classes in bridge, line dancing and 
exercise were enjoyed by enthusiasts. A small group initiated a 
new activity - bowling. Coffee and Conversation and special 
monthly programs on topics as varied as diabetes, financial 
planning, nursing homes and a Show and Tell program where 
members exhibited their hobbies were held. Monthly bus trips to 
places of interest were enjoyed by many. An Income Tax 
Assistance Program for elder citizens for. both Federal and State 
income taxes was available. All activities and programs were 
publicized in our monthly Newsletter, mailed to all residents 
eleven times during the year. 

To help with transportation needs of elder citizens, taxi 
service limited to medical purposes and a local van for in-town 
errands and activities at Bemis Hall and the Pierce House were 
available during the year. 

Again this year, we have noted an increase in the work 
load of our staff. Ruth Kramer, Director, and her assistant, 
Rhoda Presti, have continued to meet this challenge for which we 
are thankful. The Council also wishes to thank the many 
volunteers who generously give of their time in such ways as 
collating the Newletter, delivering Meals on Wheels, making 
weekly visitor calls, housekeeping duties at Bemis Hall, 
assisting with hospitality at clinics, programs and social 
functions. The programs and activities could not take place 
effectively without their help. 

We look forward to another busy year with the continuance 
of our programs and activities. 



84 



MINUTEMAN HOME CARE (MHC) 



Marie "Jackie" Gavin, Alternate Member 
Ruth Morey, Board Member 

Minuteman Home Care (MHC) is a non-profit social service agency 
which assists persons 60 years and older to live in dignity and comfort 
in their homes and communities. Over 95% of the Minuteman Home Care 
budget comes from State and Federal funding sources. 

1. State Home Care Program provides services such as homemaking, 
chores, transportation and some administrative services. 

2. Title III B and Title III C of the Older Americans Act provide 
funding for congregate meals and home delivered meal programs, legal 
services, medical transportation services, and innovative community 
projects. 

Through payment of an annual "local share" Lincoln is entitled to 
be represented on the policy setting Board of Members (MHC) which 
administers the services. During the 1988 fiscal year the local share 
assessed the Town of Lincoln was $380.00, slightly higher than 1987. The 
amount is calculated from a formula based on members of the community 
aged 60 years and over, as determined by the 1980 Federal Census. 

During fiscal year July 1, 1987 to June 30, 1988, eleven Lincoln 
residents received services under the State Home Care Program for a total 
value of $16,721.00. The total value of MHC contributions and services 
in Lincoln in fiscal year 1988 is $24,111.00; the sum of funds channeled 
through MHC from State Home Care, Titles III B and III C of the Older 
Americans Act. 

Under Special Programs eight individuals in Lincoln took advantage 
of the new Alzheimer's program receiving either training, education or 
private consultations. 

This year Lincoln has been represented by Member 
Ruth I. Morey of South Great Road serving on Finance Service and 
Nominating Committee. Marie "Jackie" Gavin, Wells Road, Alternate 
Member, is serving on Hospitality and Service committees. 



85 



ANIMAL CONTROL OFFICER 



Barbara L. King 



1988 activities are compiled below: 



Reports of Lost Dogs 
Dogs Found By Dog Officer 
Other Animals Dealt With 
Dead /Hit Animals 
Number of Dogs in Pound 
Dog Bites Reported 
Restraining Orders Issued 
Quarantine Orders Issued 
Complaints Received 
Total Phone Calls Received 
Miles Logged 



1,649.7 



176 
61 
24 
12 
52 
10 
7 
5 

102 
570 



The Town of Lincoln held its Annual Rabies Clinic May 21, 
1988. Jane Barnet assisted Dr. Gardiner Kenneson in vaccinating 
30 Town dogs. 

Reminder*. All dog owners must license their dogs 
annually. All dog licenses expire March 31 every year. A late 
fee of $5.00 will be added to the regular license fee if the 
licenses is not purchased by July 1. 

Residents have been most cooperative in licensing their 
canines on time. This is a great help in placing one's lost 
loved pet with its original owner. 

Many thanks to our Police/Fire Department for their 
continual help. 

The DPW deserves recognition for disposal of claimed and 
unclaimed carcasses. 

A special thanks to Arthur Cotoni for support and coverage 
to the Town for times when I have not been available. 

Jane Barnet, Joe Mannarino, and Dr. Bachrach have been 
very generous with their time, thank you. 



86 



NORTH EAST SOLID WASTE COMMITTEE (NESWC) 



Henry J. Rugo, Town Representative 

Since last year's report provided comprehensive coverage 
of NESWC s activities, this report will be confined to 
significant changes. The 1987 report is incorporated herein by 
reference. 

Plant Operations: Facility on-line time has averaged 90% 
for the year, due to exceptionally good preventive maintenance 
procedures. A pit fire in January required NESWC waste to 
by-pass the plant to the Peabody landfill for one week. Methods 
for prevention, detection and suppression of future fires 
continue to be investigated and improvements put in place. 
Damages to the building have been repaired. Other causes of 
interruptions, which were short-lived and infrequent, were due 
to external causes not under plant control. They demonstrated 
interaction with such elements as fluctuation in the voltage of 
the power grid into which is fed the electricity generated by 
the plant and availability of a nearby unrelated landfill to 
commercial haulers for whom NESWC is an alternate disposal site. 

Budget: Expenses have been consistent with budget 
estimates. Efforts continue to create and increase project 
revenues from the limited possible sources. 

Investment Program: To increase income from debt service 
restricted capital reserves, a program for more effective 
control of investments was put in place with the assistance of 
an independent financial advisor. A Financial Affairs 
Subcommittee with the Treasurer as chair was created to set 
policy and monitor the investment program. In nine months from 
initiation during which approximately three-quarters of 
available funds were committed primarily to U.S. Treasury 
securities, a gain above previous practice of about $400,000 was 
experienced. 

Debt Service Reduction: Outstanding against NESWC are 
some high-interest bonds that were included in the original 
Trust Indenture to reduce early-year tipping fees. On NESWC s 
initiative, rapidly accelerated prepayment has begun and issue 
of new bonds averted. This will increase tipping fees slightly 
for four years, but will produce about $16 million in long-term 
savings which will be used to reduce tipping fees beginning five 
years out. 

Intensive investigation of opportunities to refinance 
outstanding construction bonds has begun toward establishing a 
plan that will be put into action as soon as NESWC contractual 
strictures permit. 



87 



Legislation: After three years of intensive lobbying, a 
bill creating NESWC as a public instrumentality was signed into 
law on December 5th. NESWC becomes a legal entity effective 
March 5, 1989. 

One-time bonding authority is being sought from the state 
legislature to enable still earlier repayment of the outstanding 
high-interest bonds with others at a lower rate to yield still 
greater savings in project costs. Feasibility of other means is 
also being investigated for the same purpose while avoiding the 
delays and uncertainties of the legislative process. 

Recycling: A private firm has been selected by 
competitive bid to develop a materials recycling facility that 
would serve the needs of NESWC member communities. Negotiations 
were begun to develop a standardized contract which would 
provide flexibility to meet the plans of any individual 
community with costs and benefits known before commitment. 

Management: The Lincoln representative was re-elected 
NESWC Treasurer and member of the Executive Committee, both for 
a two-year term. 

Questions and suggestions for NESWC are invited. 



88 



LINCOLN RECYCLING COMMITTEE 



Abigail Avery 
Vicky Diadiuk 
Harry Hadley 
Gwyn Loud 

Enid Sichel, Chairman 
Introduction 

As charged by the Selectmen, the Recycling Committee 
examined the cost and effectivness of recycling many waste items 
and materials. Recycling of paper and glass is shown to be 
cost-effective today because it represents a savings of NEWSC 
tipping fees of $60/ton plus $12/ton transportation. The 
Committee made an attempt to estimate the tonnage of recyclable 
material expected, so the amount of waste sent to NESWC can be 
calculated. With current Lincoln numbers and experience gained 
from other towns, the expected annual savings are $18,000 (250 
tons) for newspaper, $60/ton for office paper, $100/ton for 
computer paper, and $2800 (60 tons) for glass. These four items 
have been chosen for our initial recycling effort because of 
their ease of collection, marketability, and volume as a 
fraction of the overall waste tonnage. The Town of Wellesley, 
which probably has the most comprehensive and successful 
recycling program in the Commonwealth, was used as a reference 
for the proposed Lincoln program. Lincoln will not be able to 
begin with a program as comprehensive as Wellesley' s. Instead, 
the Committee attempted to set up a program that can be upgraded 
as the need and success of the initial stages warrant. 

Discussion 

1. Cost: 

There are three costs to the disposal of each trash item: 
the cost of collection, hauling, and tipping. 

Collection costs are further broken down into pick-up and 
storage. Pick-up costs are small in Lincoln because there is no 
pick-up service provided by the Town. Two-thirds of the 
residents take their own trash to the transfer station and the 
remaining third use private collection services. Recyclables 
are stored in containers which are leased or purchased (real 
costs) . In a small town such as Licnoln, recyclables are kept a 
long time before reaching marketable quantities. 

The costs of hauling trash to NESWC or to the recycler are 
not within our control if we use a commercial hauler, and are 
only marginally controllable if the Lincoln DPW provides the 
transportation. 



89 



Tipping fees change annually as a result of market forces 
and energy costs (sales of NESWC power). They are also beyond 
the control of the Town. 

2. Items considered by the Committee but not recommended at 
this time: 

a. The Millis recycling and disposal plan, which calls for 
a private contractor, in Millis, to take over our entire trash 
disposal and recycling effort. The plan shows no particular 
promise of being lower in cost than our present proposed system, 
and is not now in operation. We should, however, keep informed 
of the Millis plan as it develops. 

b. Mandatory recycling is an interesting option, since it 
does increase the total material collected and reduces the time 
over which any investment is recovered. We are reluctant to 
recommend mandatory recycling, but it may become necessary in 
the future. 

c. User fees would permit free use of the transfer station 
for those who recycle. They would provide incentives to 
commercial haulers and individuals to recycle. 

d. Disposing of used crankcase oil is a concern. We are 
not recommending recycling because commercial disposal is 
available at some gas stations. We are concerned about the 
environmental hazard of improperly disposed oil, but the volume 
of oil disposed in Lincoln is too small for us to recommend a 
recycling program at this time. 

e. In the future, we may find that plastic, metal, and 
"white goods" (ref rigeratiors , stoves, etc.) can be recycled. 
At present there is no economical way to recycle these items, 
largely due to the lack of an industrial base in the northeast. 

Another future concern is the increasing percentage of trash 
going to the transfer station via garbage trucks. That tonnage 
is presently unavailable for recycling. 

Recommendations 

1. Newspaper 

The Committee recommends that Lincoln recycle newspapers at 
the transfer station. We have found a recycler (Paper Fiber 
Corp) who will supply the recycling bin and provide 
transportation to the paper mill. The bin will be open at the 



90 



top and newspapers can be dropped in all along the side to 
assure filling. The paper price will be adjusted downward if 
the paper is wet. Newspaper recycling is economical because it 
is less costly than the NESWC tipping fees and transportation 
fees. The sale price of the newspaper is not sufficient to 
cover the transportation costs but will save the Town about 
$18,000 per year in tipping fees if half the total households 
will recycle newspaper. At present there is no way to include 
the households which pay for trash pick-up. 

2. Office paper 

The Committee recommends that Lincoln recycle computer and 
white office paper (bond and copy paper) because there is a 
recycling value of $60/ton for office paper and $100 for 
computer paper. The bins could be placed at the Lincoln schools 
and/or the Town Hall to reduce the tonnage of white paper which 
goes to NESWC via town-hired trash pick-up service. The bins 
would be available to townspeople during business hours for 
anyone wishing to recycle white paper. We have identified a 
recycler (Ginsberg Co.) who will supply the bins and the 
transportation to the paper mill as part of its service. 

3. Glass 

The Committee recommends that the Town recycle glass at the 
transfer station. We recommend North Atlantic Recycling 
Services because it will recycle clear and green glass and will 
supply the recyling container. Hauling will also be provided. 
The estimated tonnage of glass, if half the households recyle, 
is 60 tons. The price of recyclable glass is negligible, but 
the annual savings of NEWSC fees will be about $2800. 

4. On-going supervision and publicity 

A successful recycling program will require public awareness 
and cooperation among the townspeople, Committee, volunteers, 
and the DPW. We recommend that the Town establish an on-going 
Recycling Committee to monitor the start of Lincoln's new 
recycling effort, to organize publicity, to recommend 
improvements as the program develops, and keep up to date on all 
market data. It is also important to keep abreast of state 
recycling programs and regional recyling possibilities. The 
Eastern Massachusetts Recycling Association is a good source of 
information. 

In the event that the completion of the permanent transfer 
station is delayed beyond the scheduled January 1, 1989 date, we 
recommend that permits be sought to establish the recycling 
program at the current transfer station starting on or before 
January 1, 1989. 



91 



Planning and Public Works 



PLANNING BOARD 

F. Douglas Adams 
Kenneth Basset 
Liz Corcoran 
Palmer Faran 

William Constable, Chairman 

Cooperation among Town boards remains a decisive element in 
Lincoln's conservation, affordable housing and other land use 
initiatives. Successful innovations in areas as diverse as bike 
paths and affordable housing, town wells and national parks, and 
accessory apartments and controlling rapid commercial growth in 
adjacent communities, all owe their success to cooperative and 
energetic action by multiple Town boards and community 
organizations. The Planning Board, as an agency whose decisions 
almost always draw upon input from other committees, takes the 
opportunity of the 1988 Annual Town Report to commend all of the 
other boards, committees and organizations whose reports grace 
these pages. 

The Town's stellar achievements may be traced in large part 
to cooperative achievement of multiple Town goals rather than 
mere advocacy of parochial interest. This spirit is illustrated 
in the Planning Board's activities in 1988. The Board's 
standard bill-of-fare includes subdivisions, site plan 
approvals, sign regulations and accessory apartments. All 
benefit by regular input from the Board of Health, Water 
Commissioners, Building Department and Town Engineer. This 
year, discussions concerning subdivisions centered on such 
properties as the McMahon, Coburn Farm, Winchell, Stratford 
Realty, Rowe, Panetta and Fletcher Farm parcels. Substantial 
additional effort will be required on the Stratford Realty and 
Winchell subdivisions in 1989. 

For another year, the North Lincoln Plan Development Area 
has required a substantial portion of the Planning Board's 
energy. Battle Road Farm began construction in October, after 
several months of daily attention needed to help Lincoln House 
Associates solve certain regulatory, financing, construction and 
design difficulties which arose. The documentation necessary to 
ensure permanent af fordability and efficient administration are 
now in their final stages of preparation. Lincoln North, the 
commercial component of the North Lincoln Planned Development 
Area, received its special permit and site plan approval early 
in the year, and was well along in construction by year end. 



92 



As the Town has begun looking at additional affordable 
housing opportunities, the Planning Board has participated in 
the search for additional ways to solve this pressing need. 
Affordable housing opportunities have been the focus of an 
analysis of Town land as well as a component of the Planning 
Board's Long Range Planning Committee's examination of private 
undeveloped land in town. 

Other issues on which the Planning Board has focused its 
attention in 1988 include the dramatic new master plan for the 
Minute Man National Park, as well as pending proposals for the 
sale and development of large parcels at Bethany and the Ryan 
land near South Lincoln. Significant use changes along Lewis 
Street, the library site plan and participation in Flint Fields 
protection have also come before the Board. Such 
administrative issues as second kitchens, home occupations, and 
technical revisions of by laws have been discussed. In 
addition, the Planning Board and its subcommittees have 
continued ongoing planning activities within the Town and with 
its adjoining communities through such organizations as the 
MAPC, the Hanscom Area Advisory Committee, the Hanscom Area 
Traffic Study Committee, the Winter Street Task Force and 
various ad hoc groups. 

Significant land use challenges for the Town in 1989 have 
begun to emerge. The Board anticipates major development 
activity on several key parcels of land, including some for 
which an affordable housing component may be most appropriate. 
As the Town seeks to control its land use future, the fine 
reports produced by the Long Range Planning Committee will be 
examined and outreach efforts begun on important parcels in Town 
identified in that study. 

In addition to the Board's appreciation for the cooperation 
and assistance of all other Town boards, agencies and 
individuals, it wishes to note particularly its appreciation to 
Warren Flint, Jr., who vacated the Board to become a Selectman 
and to Mary Forsythe, the Planning Board Administrative 
Assistant who left her position in favor of motherhood. 
Similarly, the Board welcomed Ken Bassett as its newest Board 
member, and hired Joyce Miller, a long-time Conservation 
Commission member in Lexington, as the Board's new 
Administrative Assistant. 



93 



BOARD OF APPEALS 



Despena Billings 
Morton B. Braun 
C. Russel Hansen 
D'Arcy G. MacMahon 
Margaret B. Marsh, Chairman 

Amalie Kass, Associate Member 
F. John Solman, Associate Member 

There were 15 applications filed, 9 hearings scheduled, 21 
renewals published during 1988 as follows. 



February 1 - STEPHEN MILLER, 107 OLD COUNTY RD. special 

permit for nonconforming lot. WITHDRAWN 
ROBERT & JACQUELIN APSLER, MILL ST. variance 
from width of lot. DENIED 



April 11 - ELIZABETH SCHULLER, 131 LINCOLN RD, special 

permit for nonconforming lot. GRANTED 

May 16 - ANGELO BASILE, 9 OLD SUDBURY RD. special 

permit for apartment. WITHDRAWN 
HUNTER ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES, 10 LEWIS ST. 

special permit for laboratory. GRANTED 

June 20 - KENNETH OLSHANSKY & HOPE GREENFIELD, 124 

SOUTH GREAT RD. special permit to retain 
setback on increased lot. GRANTED 
RUTH M. BURK, CONANT RD. variance from 

width of lot. GRANTED 



July 11 - SEJFI PROTOPAPA, LEWIS ST. special permit 

for businesses. GRANTED 
ANGELO BASILE, 9 OLD SUDBURY RD. special 

permit for apartment. GRANTED 

August 8 - SEJFI PROTOPAPA, LEWIS ST. special permit 

for business. GRANTED 



September 12- ANTHONY MRUGALA, CAMBRIDGE TPKE. special 

permit for hay rides. GRANTED 
LINCOLN AUTOMOTIVE, INC., 170 SOUTH GREAT 
RD. modification of special permit for 
nonconforming use. GRANTED 

September 26- GILES DILG, lib LEWIS ST., special permit 

for cobbler. GRANTED 
MASSPORT AUTHORITY & LINCOLN HOUSE ASSOC., 
76 OLD BEDFORD RD., special permit 
temporary use. GRANTED 



94 



December 5 - GILES DILG, lib LEWIS ST. special permit 

for wood working business. GRANTED 



RENEWALS: Peter Adams, Baker Farm Rd. - Apartment 

Joseph Azrack, Bedford Rd. - Apartment 
Board of Selectmen, Lewis St. - Bus parking 
John Briedis, Bedford Rd. - Apartment 
Alan L. Donaldson, 279 South Great Rd. - Apartment 
Sarah Holden, Weston Rd. - Apartment 
Murray Horwitz, Conant Rd. - Apartment 
Eliot & Margaret Hubbard, Winter St. - Apartment 
Hamilton James, Winter St. - Apartment 
Anne Knowlton, Stonehedge - Apartment 
Anil Kumar, Conant Rd. - Apartment 
Massachusetts Audubon Society, South Great Rd. - 

nonresidential use 
Eugene B. Meyer, 31 Trapelo Rd. - Apartment 
Keith & Janet Miller, Baker Bridge Rd. - Apartment 
Anthony J. Mrugala, Cambridge Tpke. - Hay rides 
Susan & Robert Okin, Bedford Rd. - Apartment 
Alice Pickman, Concord Rd. - Apartment 
Robert C. Pickett, Longmeadow Rd. - Apartment 
John R. Snelling, Farrar Rd. - Office 
Barry & Judith Solar, 152 Trapelo Rd. - Apartment 
Anne Young, 41 Bedford Rd. - Apartment 



95 



LONG RANGE PLANNING COMMITTEE 



Liz Downey 

Bob Jenal 

Katherine Preston 

Bill Stason 

Rich Theriault 

Larry Thompson 

Bob Lemire, Chairman 



Our planning horizon is the year 2004 when Lincoln will 
celebrate the 250th anniversary of its incorporation as a town. 
Over the interim period it is not unreasonable to project a full 
build-out of those remaining parcels where change can take place. 

In 1988 we completed the task of mapping those parcels in 
Lincoln where change can take place, estimating their potential 
for change, and identifying the public interest in those parcels. 

As 1988 drew to a close, we began the process of meeting 
with the Selectmen, Planning and other Town Boards vested with 
the Town's land use interests in order to formulate outreach 
approaches to key landowners. The objective of this process is 
to identify landowners who may be considering disposition of 
their property, inform them of the Town's interests, and enlist 
their cooperation in the preparation of value realization plans 
that are in harmony with the Town's land use objectives. We 
plan to complete this process in early 1989. 

We have also begun to identify resources available to the 
Town in its efforts to bring about desired change. We believe 
the Town's outreach program will facilitate the process of 
saving what needs to be saved and the building of what needs to 
be built as the final wave of change under Lincoln's present 
zoning expresses itself. 



96 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



Thomas Billings 

Claire Cunningham 

Joan Kimball 

Robert Mack 

Nathalie Rice 

William Rizzo 

J. Quincy Adams, Chairman 

In 1988, the Selectmen received and accepted Kenneth 
Bassett's resignation after seven years on the Commission. Mr. 
Bassett, a professional planner, has given much valuable input 
to the Commission, which wishes him well in his seat on the 
Planning Board. The vacancy has been ably filled by Joan 
Kimball, a long time Lincoln resident with a background in 
geology. 

PLANNING AND ADMINISTRATION 

Open Space Activities : Lincoln's abundance of open space is 
treasured by its citizens, appreciated by those who use it for 
recreational purposes, and admired by many who wished they could 
live here. However, many do not realize that much of this 
existing open space is unprotected, and may be lost to 
development. With ever increasing pressures for development, we 
must plan carefully to preserve the character of our Town. The 
Commission, through the efforts of Nathalie Rice, has continued 
to update our Open Space Plan, revise it where necessary, and 
will send a new Open Space Map to all households in Lincoln in 
the spring of 1989. 

Together with the Planning Board, the Commission has 
negotiated with developers to gain trail easements for the 
Town. The Commission has gratefully accepted trail easements 
from Kenneth Eisner, Countryside Contemporaries, for Coburn Farm 
and from Jeffrey Allsopp, First Atlantic Properties, for access 
through the Rowe Estate development on Winter Street and Old 
County Road. Ken Eisner has also preserved a portion of Coburn 
Farm in a Conservation Restriction, which the Commission is 
pleased to accept. 

Since the update of the Open Space Plan in 1983, the Flint 
Fields have stood at the top of the list of land of conservation 
interest. As the first documented working farm in Lincoln, the 
fields' historical and agricultural significance are of 
inestimable value, and must not be lost to development. The 
Commission began formal discussions with the Flints in the 
spring of 1988 and is attempting to preserve these fields in 
their present state. In 1989, with skyrocketing real estate 
values and severe financial pressures on the Town and the State, 
this is a difficult task. Unfortunately, state funding sources, 



97 



for which this acquisition would qualify, have fallen victim to 
budgetary cutbacks, and are not available this year. Since the 
loss of these fields would permanently alter the character of 
our Town, the Commission is looking for Town Meeting support and 
substantial donations from the private sector to offset the cost 
of the acquisition. 

Wetlands : Shortly before Town Meeting in 1988, the Commission 
proposed a Local Wetlands By-law, under the direction of member 
Robert Mack. However, facing many questions from citizens at a 
public hearing, the Commission decided to withdraw the proposal 
from 1988' s Town Meeting in order to respond to these 
questions. Since that time, the Commission revised the by-law 
proposed last year, and will submit the final by-law to Spring 
Town Meeting. This by-law will complement the Massachusetts 
Wetlands Protections Act, and allow the Commission to better 
protect Lincoln's wetland resources. 

In 1988, the Commission held twenty- two public hearings 
under the Wetlands Protection Act. Further work on the Battle 
Road Farm project included approval of the water main along 
Hanscom Drive and an Amended Order of Conditions for changes to 
the drainage design. These changes will have a lesser impact 
upon the wetlands than the original plan. The Commission also 
reviewed and approved Phase II of the Route 2 upgrades, 
involving the intersection at Bedford Road. Other activities 
included coordination with other boards in capping the former 
Lincoln Landfill and the Water Commissioners for their test 
wells in the Codman Forest. 

Staffing : The Commission regretfully accepted the resignation 
of Tara Tracy, the Board's Conservation Administrator. After 
three years of excellent work with the Town, Tara now brings her 
talents in administration and wetlands protection to a position 
in the private sector. The Commission was delighted to hire 
Barbara Walther to fill the Administrator position, since she 
had worked as an intern and the Chief Ranger for two years . 
Gary Puffer, a landscaper and equipment operator, has been hired 
as Conservation Technician, to work with our other Conservation 
Technician Scott Mooney. Michael Murphy continues as 
Conservation Land Manager, performing his duties with skill and 
sensitivity. After one year of enthusiastic work, Chief Ranger 
Rich Marcou left to pursue opportunities in northern New 
Hampshire. Ruth Perlow, an environmental educator and 
enthusiastic naturalist, has been hired as Chief Ranger and as 
conservation intern. 

CONSERVATION LAND MANAGEMENT 

Ranger Program : For ten years now, the Lincoln Rangers have 
provided an enthusiastic and knowledgable presence on Lincoln's 
conservation lands. Many look to the Rangers for directions as 



98 



well as information about the Town's historical and natural 
surroundings. College students Maria Mercuri and John Morris 
aided Chief Ranger Rich Marcou during the sweltering heat of the 
Summer of '88, writing 37 citations for swimming, and 4 
citations for fishing, at Flint's Pond. In addition, the 
Rangers continued summer interpretive programming with a series 
of walks throughout Town. In 1988, user visits totalled nearly 
30,000 on all conservation lands. 

Farmland Program : Rental fees from Town-owned agricultural 
lands totalled $3670.50 in 1988. Through continued coordination 
with the farmers, the Commission has been able to monitor the 
pesticide use on the fields (following the recommendations of 
the Agricultural Pesticide Subcommittee) . With a successful 
acquisition of the Flint Fields, the Commission hopes to 
continue the agricultural use of these fields by renting the 
northern portion of the field to interested local farmers, while 
the Flint family would continue to farm the southern portion of 
the field. The northern portion of the field is currently 
farmed as cropland by Stephen Verrill of Verrill Farms. 

Trails : At the Tanner's Brook parcel, trail construction 
continued, including a loop trail near Route 2 and an opening 
between the two fields. The gravel pit at Tanner's Brook was 
finally closed with proper grading and seeding. Ski trails 
throughout Town were re-marked with yellow disks, many signs 
were replaced and new trail posts were installed. 

Fields : At the Ricci Farm parcel, a sluice gate was constructed 
to control the water level of the irrigation pond, and the 
evergreen planting on the north side of the field was 
completed. Continued field mowing took place throughout Town on 
Commission property, LLCT land and other Town property. 

Woodlands : At the Baker Bridge parcel a wildlife forestry cut 
was conducted, promoting poplar growth for wildlife forage and 
cover. At Pine Hill a view of Walden and the Monadnock mountain 
range was created by the removal and pruning of trees. Trails 
throughout Town were cleared of debris caused by an early summer 
thunderstorm boasting 50 mph winds. 

Town Plantings and Tree Care : Chestnut oaks were planted along 
Weston Road near Brownings Field. These stately shade trees 
were planted in the field to provide plenty of room for crown 
and root growth. At the Lexington Road Cemetery, chestnut oaks 
were planted. Care of the elms took place with continued 
monitoring and injection of trees to combat the Dutch Elm 
disease. This year was very bad for elms throughout Town with 
weather conditions favorable for the spread of the disease. At 
the Library, trees were removed for construction and remaining 
trees were protected with fencing, wood chips on root surfaces, 
and watering. 



99 



Other Projects : Wood duck nesting boxes were constructed and 
installed throughout Town. The overflow parking area at the 
Canoe Landing was completed with the installation of a 
low-profile barrier. Continued management of the Baker Bridge 
Brush Dump took place, with composting of leaves added as an 
objective. 

Miscellaneous projects include assistance with snow 
removal, litter and building material cleanup, mechanical 
maintenance, firewood deliveries, and erosion control. 



100 



TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE 



Jonathan Hubbard 

Michael Kassner 

Lois Love 

David O'Neill 

Robert Schudy 

Terry Fenton, Chairman 



During the past year the Traffic Management Committee 
completed its primary task of providing the Town with a Traffic 
Management Plan. This document, which contains 111 pages of 
text, tables and figures, represents an attempt to survey 
existing traffic conditions, project changes resulting from 
ongoing development in the surrounding area and recommend 
measures by which the Town can preserve its character and 
quality of life in the face of a dramatic increase in through 
traffic. It examines the traffic volumes and capacities of the 
numbered highways that pass through Lincoln, analyzing problem 
intersections and discussing potential solutions. It also 
studies the local roads most severely endangered by commuter 
traffic, focusing upon key intersections at which through 
traffic could be directed towards the numbered highway system by 
means of turning restrictions. The Committee's recommendations 
include suggestions for implementing certain turning 
restrictions on a trial basis and performing a careful study of 
the resulting costs and benefits. 

In addition to preparing the Traffic Management Plan, 
Committee members have worked on specific traffic-related 
projects, such as analysing the impacts of the proposed Boston 
Properties development on Old County Road and responding to the 
plans put forward by the Minuteman National Park, which call for 
a relocation of Route 2A. It is expected that Committee members 
will participate in similar projects in the future. 



101 



LINCOLN LAND CONSERVATION TRUST 



Robert C. Brannen 

William G. Constable 

Margaret P. Flint, Secretary 

William A. King 

Margaret B. Marsh 

Samuel G. Mygatt 

Paul J. Svetz, Treasurer 

William M. Preston, Chairman 



In 1988, the Lincoln Land Conservation Trust applied greater 
than usual resources to its primary function, protecting the 
agricultural and forest land which has been entrusted to it and 
the more than 20 miles of trails which traverse land owned by 
the Land Trust and many, many private individuals. Although not 
particularly newsworthy, the Land Trust is proud to provide this 
service. 

Active stewardship of the agricultural land owned by the 
Land Trust has continued, with significant improvement in 
productivity provided by extraordinary efforts of certain people 
who rent Land Trust agricultural land. Warren Flint, in his 
treatment of the Land Trust's Wheeler Fields, serves as one 
example of someone who improves the Land Trust's agricultural 
land with sensitivity and effectiveness. 

Extending beyond the Town's border, in 1988 the Land Trust 
became an active sponsor of the Land Trust Exchange, 
representing land trusts across the country. Originally founded 
in New England, the Land Trust Exchange recently moved to 
Washington, where it provides an effective voice for private 
land conservation efforts. Townspeople interested in further 
information about this organization should contact the Land 
Trust. 

The cost of land conservation is staggering. Only three 
decades and one year ago, the Lincoln Land Conservation Trust 
was formed to purchase its first parcel. The three acres 
acquired adjacent to Flint's Pond cost $11,500.00. Although 
annual costs for maintaining conservation land have not 
increased a hundred-fold, the cost of maintaining the trails, 
caring for other conservation land, and improving farm land has 
risen dramatically. 

In addition to the yeoman efforts by the Land Trust's Field 
Committee, Trail Committee, Treasurer and Secretary, the Land 
Trust was fortunate to have two fine young persons serving as 
its trail crew this summer. Matthew Moss and Noah Taylor 
(coinciden tally each the grandchild of early supporters of the 
Land Trust) worked vigorously opening and widening trails, 
clearing storm-blown trees, spraying poison ivy, and restoring 
old fields. The coordination and assistance by Mike Murphy of 
the Conservation Commission was once again most appreciated. 



102 



TREASURER'S REPORT 



Balance 12/31/87 

Harvard Trust 4,274.90 

Fidelity Daily Income Trust 8,736.98 

Fidelity Cash Reserves 15,762.27 

Jean W. Preston Memorial Fund 10,831.68 

Securities 1,120.00 



Received 

Contributions 5,755.00 

Sale of trail maps 1,041.00 

Rent (Fields) 220.00 

Dividends, misc. 32.04 

Matching gifts 165.00 
Interest: 

Harvard Trust 290.95 

Fidelity Daily Income Trust 597.08 

Fidelity Cash Reserves 1,144.88 

Jean W. Preston Memorial Fund 786.75 



Expenses 

Wages and supplies 4,010.19 

Equipment and repairs 275.97 

Insurance 634.08 

Printing & Postage 841.09 

Legal, filing fees, misc. 62.55 

Mowing and tree removal 43.75 

Social Security Taxes 619.57 



Balance 12/31/88 

Harvard Trust 5,291.69 

Fidelity Daily Income Trust 9,334.06 

Fidelity Cash Reserves 16,907.15 

Jean W. Preston Memorial Fund 11,618.43 

Securities 1,120.00 



103 



HOUSING COMMISSION 



Lorian Brown 
Giles Browne 
Henry Morgan 

Lee Harrison, Co-Chairman 
Raymond Johnson, Co-Chairman 

In March, Mary Helen Lorenz did not run for reelection 
and left the Housing Commission, after 6 years of service. She 
had worked long and hard for the Town and the Commission, 
particularly on the establishment and organization of the Codman 
Community Farmhouse, the development of the Battle Road Farm 
housing in North Lincoln and the Town's Five-Year Housing Plan. 

Major Projects 

This year the Commission completed three major projects 
to which it had been committed for years. Each produced a 
document which provides the Housing Commission and the Town with 
information necessary to assess our present position and to 
determine the wisest course for the future. 

1. The final draft of the Five-Year Housing Plan for the 
Town was submitted to the Executive Office of Communities and 
Development in June. This plan fulfilled a commitment of the 
Town to producing for the State an account of the current 
housing stock in Lincoln and an assessment of current and future 
needs for affordable housing. 

2. Our intern, Elizabeth Murphy, completed a report to 
the Commission which describes the current status of affordable 
housing in Lincoln and the alternatives available for 
establishing more affordable and low income housing through a 
local housing authority and a local nonprofit housing 
corporation. She included a detailed description of the various 
state programs for low and moderate income housing, including an 
account of when and for what purposes each may be used. 

3. A third important project which was completed was the 
publication of a survey by Kay Alexander Associates of five 
Town-owned sites as to the suitability of each for low and 
moderate income housing. The survey included a site analysis 
for each parcel of Town-owned land which was initially selected 
by the Long Range Planning Committee as being suitable for 
affordable housing. The impetus for this project came from 
questions raised on the floor of Town Meeting as to why 
affordable housing is so expensive to build, followed by answers 
to the effect that the high cost of buying buildable land in 
Lincoln drives up the costs of building. It was suggested that 
the Town use land it already owns to build affordable housing; 
the Housing Commission responded with this survey, which was, on 
the whole, well-received. 



104 



The Housing Commission has continued to work with other 
Town Boards and committees on: 1) providing for continuing 
af fordability for the Battle Road Farms units as mandated by the 
Town; 2) discussing possibilities for developing the Bethany 
land; 3) designating parcels of land as suitable for housing; 4) 
increasing the availability of accessory apartments; and 5) 
supporting private initiatives to meet housing needs. 

Operations 

The Commission drew up a job description and interviewed 
for a housing services director for the Town, taking a much 
needed step toward organizing our day-to-day operations as well 
as toward reviewing and coordinating our housing services. By 
the end of the year, it seemed that bringing a part-time 
employee in to perform these tasks was imminent. 

One of the Town's houses on Tower Road became vacant, and 
the decision was made not to re-let it until substantial 
improvements have been made, so the Commission administered 
seven rather than eight units of Town-owned housing by the end 
of the year. The units at Codman Farm House are all occupied, 
and that enterprise is proceeding very well with the assistance 
of a dedicated committee. 

This year saw the completed renovations to the Sunnyside 
Lane house and its immediate occupancy by a family from the 
Concord Housing Authority waiting list. There was an open house 
to celebrate the rehabilitation of the house, and all agreed 
that an excellent job had been done. The one regrettable aspect 
of this project was that because Lincoln does not have a housing 
authority, it cannot receive state or federal rent subsidies; 
the only way the Town could manage to rent the house to a 
subsidized family was through the Concord Housing Authority, 
which of course does not give preference to Lincoln residents. 

Housing Authority Proposal 

In the fall, the Commission decided to bring before the 
Town the issue of whether the Town shall have a housing 
authority. The Town created the Housing Commission in 1979 in 
the belief that the Commission could receive rental subsidies 
from state and federal agencies. We have since discovered that 
only housing authorities may receive such subsidies. The Town 
has been fortunate in that both the Concord Housing Authroity 
and Lexington Housing Authority have agreed to act as conduits 
for subsidies for Lincoln housing, but there are major drawbacks 
to this solution to the problem. One is that we must take 
applicants from the other Towns' waiting lists as occupants, 
thereby losing local preference, and another is that we receive 
no state funds for managing or maintaining the housing. Given 
these financial and administrative considerations, there is no 
question that a housing authority would be very useful to the 
Town. The other valuable aspect of a local housing authority is 
that it may receive state and federal funds to develop housing, 



105 



with the approval of Town Boards and compliance with Lincoln's 
zoning bylaws. Right now, the Town cannot develop subsidized 
elderly housing, a widely recognized need, because it does not 
have its own housing authority. It is for these reasons that 
the Housing Commission has decided to proceed with a warrant 
article proposing a housing authority. It is felt that if the 
Town has a housing authority which works closely with other Town 
entities, maintenance and development of affordable housing, 
especially for the elderly, will be more easily attainable 
goals. At the same time, if these goals could be met through 
some other arrangement with the state, then the Commission would 
cooperate with the Town in bargaining for such a plan. 



106 



WATER COMMISSIONERS 



Leona Champeny 
Robert L. DeNormandie 
Gabriel Farrell, Chairman 

During 1988 the Water Commissioners together with the 
Water Department, the Executive Secretary, the Town Engineer and 
the Director of DPW have completed various tasks and laid the 
groundwork for future projects. We would like to take this 
opportunity to thank Richard Carroll for his efforts throughout 
his tenure as Director of the DPW to assist the Water 
Commissioners with the completion of their duties. We will miss 
his advice and counsel and wish him well in his new post as 
Director of the Sudbury Water Department. 

The following summarizes projects undertaken during the 

year: 

Farrar Pond Well 

The well was operational during the summer months and 
provided water to the system at times of peak demand. The 
cleaning and surging of the well together with the replacement 
of the original pump with a smaller unit has been completed. We 
will continue to test and monitor the water quality during 
1989. While the original quantity of water expected will not be 
realized, we continue to perceive this source to be critical to 
Lincoln's long term supply picture. 

Flint's Pond Pumping Station 

Housing for the gas chlorination facility was completed 
and final installation is expected during 1989. The new pump 
has been operational and functioning as planned. The Minuteman 
VoTech Carpentry Class installed a new roof on the building. 

Tower Road Well 

The potassium hydroxide system installed during 1987 has 
worked flawlessly and greatly enhanced our ability to control 
the pH levels in the system. 

Future Water Sources 

During 1988 our consulting engineers completed the final 
report on the testing of over 40 test wells. Three potential 
sites have been identified as capable of producing sufficient 
quantities for eventual production. Based upon the report, 
prolonged pumping tests of the "Codman West" site will be 
undertaken in 1989. In addition to the site itself, further 
tests will be conducted between the site and Route 126 to 
determine whether any possible contamination from petroleum 



107 



products may be present. Once this site is tested and its 
potential for production assessed, the remaining two sites will 
also be tested. 

Route 2 Upgrade 

A great deal of time was spent during the year dealing 
with the impact of Route 2 upgrades at Lexington and Page Roads 
upon the water distribution system. Our initial assessment of 
minimal impact required revision due to two facts: 1. Road 
grade was lowered making the ground cover over our main 
insufficient. 2. Existing mains would be covered by new 
pavement. Working together with state authorities as well as 
our consulting engineers, we have developed a plan which will 
result in moving the existing main at Lexington Road. The cost 
(approximately £150,000, including $75,000 already appropriated) 
of these efforts will initially be born by Lincoln. We hope for 
future reimbursement by the State of a significant portion of 
the cost. 

Additional efforts are underway to develop plans for the 
Bedford Road intersection and siting of the water main going 
west along Route 2 from that intersection. We hope to 
accomplish this work in conjunction with the roadwork to 
minimize disruption. The results of this effort will be a more 
rational distribution network for this area of Lincoln, 
enhancing water quality and fire protection as well as providing 
for an emergency connection to the Town of Concord in the 
Crosby's Corner area. In order to be included in the State 
project Planning Process we are required to appropriate the 
estimated cash (approximately $225,000) this year. 

Water System Assessment 

Our consulting engineers have completed their review and 
analysis of Lincoln's existing water system, projected 
requirements and priorities for future improvements of supply, 
distribution and system controls. While current availability of 
water and distribution capability appears adequate through 2010*, 
the engineers note several items requiring improvement affecting 
the distribution system as well as our future supply. They 
incorporate a long-term plan to accomplish the tasks over the 
coming ten-fifteen years. We will be reviewing the report 
during 1989 in order to begin the process of implementing the 
many good suggestions included in the report. 

Other Projects 

implementation of a new water billing system on the Town 
computer has greatly improved this aspect of our 
operations. 



108 



*Increased coordination by Betty Lang, the Town Accountant 
with Water Department personnel has reduced the incidence 
of erroneous meter readings. 

Coordination with the Planning Board on a number of 
subdivision plans including Warbler Springs, Coburn Farms, 
Rowe Estates, Battle Road Farm and the Winchell property. 
Our primary aim in these discussions is the elimination of 
dead-end water services and adequate fire protection. 

*Assistance to the League of Women Voters with the 
preparation of an excellent brochure entitled "Lincoln's 
Water - Know Your Water System'." A hearty thank you to 
all who participated in this effort which ably describes 
Lincoln's water resources, distribution system and how 
conservation efforts can help prolong our water supply. 

In looking forward to 1989, major efforts will be aimed at 
limiting expenses so as to reduce the need for additional 
borrowings to cover expenditures relating to Route 2 and other 
system improvements. Debt service will begin to decrease until 
1995 when current borrowings will be paid off. We will also be 
focusing our attention upon administration of the Water 
Department in light of Richard Carroll's departure. EPA 
regulations are always a concern. Water quality testing 
requirements, installation and periodic testing of back flow 
prevention devices where lawn sprinkling systems are installed 
are two areas of their concern. 



Statistics as of December 31, 1988 



Miles of water main 
Hydrants in use 
Gates in use 
Blow-offs 
Services in use 



Spring Billing 
Fall Billing 



Beginning 
of Year 

51.08 
424 
569 
50 
1,544 



Additions 

1.04 

7 
25 

1 
17 



1987 



59.7 million gallons 
91.3 million gallons 
1988 



End of Year 

52.12 
431 
594 
51 
1,561 



$173,203 
$256,850 



Spring Billing 
Fall Billing 



59.6 million gallons $183,922 

84.7 million gallons $256,279 



109 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 



Vincent R. DeAmicis, Acting Superintendent 

I am pleased to report to you the accomplishments of the 
past year. The major projects are as follows: 

1. Paved part of Stonehedge and Oak Knoll Roads 

2. Finished wall on Bedford Road 

3. Relocated Bike Path on Route 117 

4. Resurfaced Route 117 from Concord River to Route 126 

5. " Installed 250 feet of water line at the D.P.W. building 

6. Removed 124 trees throughout the Town 

7. Sunnyside Lane house, driveway and landscaping 

8. Stone Seal: 

(a) Mill Street 

(b) Acorn Lane 

(c) Silver Birch 

(d) Bedford Lane 

9. 106 miscellaneous Work Orders 

All Town vehicles were serviced and maintained by the 
Highway Department. 

As always, the accomplishments of the department can only 
be achieved by the efforts of the employees and the assistance 
and cooperation of many others. My thanks to all. 



110 



LAND BANK STUDY COMMITTEE 



Chris Klem 

Lois Love 

Kemon Taschioglou 

Larry Thompson 

Ned Schuller, Chairman 

In October 1987, the Lincoln Selectmen formed the Land Bank 
Study Committee (the "Committee"), and charged it, in general, 
to "examine the pros and cons of [a real estate] transfer fee." 

The Committee met frequently during Fall and Winter of 
1987/1988, during the course of which it examined and discussed 
a wide range of material and data, including but not limited to 
the following: data submitted by the Board of Assessors on the 
value and number of real estate transactions since 1976, 
distributions of values of such transactions, opinion papers on 
both sides of the issue, land bank bills both filed and 
proposed, and numerous other materials. The Committee also 
consulted with representatives from other Town Boards and other 
sources. 

The Committee analyzed and discussed its findings, and 
reached a consensus (four in favor and one against) of 
recommending that Lincoln adopt land bank legislation. 
Thereafter an open meeting was held and the issue discussed with 
interested Townspeople. 

The Committee drafted a warrant article and motion 
authorizing the Selectmen to file legislation establishing a 
Lincoln Land Bank. At Town Meeting the motion was approved. 
The Committee drafted legislation consistent with the approved 
motion. The legislation was submitted to Carol Amick for filing 
with the State legislature in early December 1988, but has not 
been taken up as of the date hereof. 



Ill 



LINCOLN BETHANY COMMITTEE 



James Ames 

Charlotte Barnaby 

Robert Burnham 

Elizabeth Corcoran 

Claire Cunningham 

Stephen Gray 

Lee Harrison 

Kim Kassner 

Guido Perera 

Richard Proubcansky 

Dorothy Smith 

B. Grim, Alternate 

Emily Lemander, Alternate 

Elizabeth Downey, Chairman 

The Lincoln Bethany Committee met from the winter of 1988 
through spring and early fall. The Town charged the Committee 
with studying the site and deciding what would best fit on the 
land and which of the needs of the Town could be met on this 
property. 

During the spring we learned all that we could about the 
property using the materials which the sisters provided, the 
Building Department file, a tour with a State of Massachusetts 
architect, King Harvey, the Conservation Commission and the 
Assessors. 

We came up with a list of possibilities for the land, 
keeping in mind the needs of the Town, and researched each of 
these. The list was: an assisted care center for elderly, a 
life care center, a children's day care center, an adult day 
care center, affordable housing, housing for the mentally ill, 
housing for the mentally retarded, two-acre residental, cluster 
development, R3 development, elderly housing, nursing home, 
school, and mixed income housing. 

We looked at each of these for need, costs, and to whom, tax 
revenue, traffic, zoning changes needed, and general advantages 
and disadvantages. 

The Committee decided that all uses on the site should be 
tied together to make a community. 

We eliminated single family houses, cluster development and 
R3 because they had no particular social need solving 
potential. We did not recommend a school since the Town would 
have little control over that anyhow. We were told that nursing 
homes could not be built in this area because the State 
considered the supply currently available adequate. We were 
told that there does not seem to be a need in this area for more 



112 



adult day care. We eliminated children's day care because it 
would create substantial traffic and didn't seem to have a 
compelling reason to be included with the other uses on the land. 

Much time and effort was spent on researching life care and 
we decided that it really wasn't feasible under about two 
hundred and fifty units and this would create a lot of traffic. 

The best idea seemed to be an assisted care facility for 
elderly people. We could keep the number down to about one 
hundred units because one does not need to consider the 
financing of a nursing home component. Assisted care generates 
very little traffic. It is not necessary to have all of the 
units be assisted care so that some can be straight elderly 
housing. It may be possible to have the units be for mixed 
income residents. 

We also felt that ten to twenty or so units of mixed income 
housing could be placed on the other side of the drive. 
Included in those would be eight beds for the mentally ill and 
eight beds for the mentally retarded. We would like to see the 
units built with enough bedrooms to encourage families with 
children. The mentally ill and mentally retarded could possibly 
work at the assisted care center and thus help themselves and 
supply labor that would be difficult to attract in this area. 
Since the mentally ill and mentally retarded do not drive, 
traffic from these units will be minimal. 

The Committee was made up of a dedicated and hard working 
group and we hope that our recommendations will be helpful to 
the Town. 



113 



PIERCE PROPERTY COMMITTEE 



Pat Asaff 
Nelson Chu 
Edward Ferri 
Wendy Finnerty 
Judith C. F. Gross 
William Shea, Chairman 

Dawn Murphy, Pierce House Manager 

The Pierce House continues to be an increasingly popular 
setting for wedding receptions, large private functions, and 
small meetings. 

The Public Library has continued its Wednesday Morning 
Lectures and Jazz evenings twice a month. Regular meetings of 
the Minutemen, American Legion, League of Women Voters, the 
Historical Society and the Council on Aging are but a few of the 
Town groups that continue to enjoy the Pierce House 
hospitality. In all, seventy-six meetings and events took place 
in 1988. The charm and elegance of the house and grounds make 
it an ideal setting for very special events. Thirty-four 
wedding receptions and major functions were booked by 
non-Lincoln residents, including several commercial catalog 
photographic layouts. Lincoln residents held fifteen receptions 
during the past year. 

An evaluation form is sent out for each function at the 
Pierce House. The response is surprisingly high and keeps the 
Committee and Manager in touch with compliments, complaints, and 
improvement suggestions. < 

The full-time management and extensive maintenance of the 
House and Park are supported totally from private function 
fees. In spite of increasing costs and major repairs, Lincoln 
residents are still charged half the rate of non-Lincoln 
residents . 

A handicap access ramp adjacent to the main entrance has 
been approved. Great care and consideration has been taken to 
blend the ramp into the existing surroundings, preserving the 
splendor of the house and gardens. 

The electrical, phone and alarm wires have been placed 
underground. Wiring has been installed to the rear parking lot 
area where lighting hopefully will be installed this spring. 
Plans include increasing the parking lot size to help eliminate 
cars parking in the street and lawn areas. 



114 



We wish to thank Dawn and Michael Murphy for the many 
compliments received on the care of the house, lawns and gardens 
and for the extra help and attention given to our guests on 
their very special occasions. 

A very special thanks to all the Town residents who have 
shown concern and interest in the many projects at the Pierce 
House. 



115 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 



Martha DeNormandie 

Marjorie L. Holland 

H. Arnold MacLean, Chairman 

Agents: Warren F. Flint 
Nancy J. Zuelke 

Realizing that the Lincoln Cemetery charges have been low 
and that no changes had been made since October 1, 1981, the 
Commissioners made a study of charges in the surrounding towns. 
All of our rates were found to be extremely low in comparison. 
After several meetings and discussions, the Commissioners voted 
new rates, which took effect on May 21, 1988. These new rates 
and charges are still considerably below those of our 
neighboring towns. They are as follows: 

CEMETERY CHARGES 

Lots $4.00 sq. ft. 

Standard Interments* 225.00 weekdays 

300.00 weekends & holidays 
Cremations & Infants*// 75.00 weekdays 

100.00 weekends & holidays 
Footing for monuments 35.00 per square foot 



* Extra charge in winter with 4 inches or more of frost and snow 
$75.00. 

// Providing the excavation does not exceed 2X2 1/2 feet. 

Extra charge for ledge is cost of removal. 

In addition to regular maintenance in the Town of 
Lincoln's three cemeteries, extensive trimming and pruning of 
shrubs, yews, mountain laurel, rhododendrons and various types 
of trees was conducted under the supervision of Warren Flint. 
Also, the railing and gate in front of the Arbor Vitae Cemetery 
received some much needed repair work. The Lexington Road 
Cemetery experienced some vandalism during the past year. The 
Lincoln Police Department has been so informed. 

During the year, 32 lots were sold and there were 27 
interments. 



116 



CELEBRATIONS COMMITTEE 



Robert Fraser 
Robert Pinto 
Henry Morgan 

Jeffrey M. Mudge, Co-Chairman 
Clare Pinto, Co-Chairman 

The Committee's role is to coordinate all activities for 
three major holidays: Patriots' Day, Memorial Day and 
Independence Day. 

Patriots Day festivities began April 9th with a 
re-enactment of Paul Revere 's capture by the Lincoln Minutemen 
under the direction of Captain Prince C. Teabo. On the 15th, 
the Alarm and Muster took place followed by the March to Concord 
on the 16th. Concluding the events, the Graves Ceremony was 
held on April 24th. 

Memorial Day again dawned hot and humid. Father Mark 
Hollingsworth of Lincoln's St. Anne's Parish presided at this 
solemn event. Admiral Irving H. Chase presented a briefly 
amusing, then historically informative and personally moving 
speech at the library following the parade. Because the hike 
down to the Library's terrace would have been too much for most 
of us, the Committee provided refreshments at Bemis Hall 
following the ceremonies. As usual, the parade was led by the 
Lincoln Minutemen who provided a spectacular display with their 
muskets at each cemetery and at the conclusion of the parade. 

Glorious weather - dry and only warm for at least the 
seventh year in a row - contributed greatly to the success of 
the glorious Fourth. The program of family-oriented events 
based on the theme "Heroines and Heros of Lincoln" included: 

-Road races were directed by our own Susie Hunter. A 
record number of competitors participated. 

-Children's Parade was marshalled by Bryce and Robert Wolf. 

-The main parade then formed around the Ballfield. This 
year, our Honorary Grand Marshal was Lincoln's popular 
Police Chief Jim Arena. 

-Retiring State Representative Cile Hicks was our honored 
guest. Henry Morgan and Robert Pinto served as parade 
marshals . 

-As usual, Connie Smith mustered a large number of 
gorgeous antique cars. Bands played in the parade. Fire 
equipment from seven towns screamed at onlookers. 



117 



-After the awards ceremony, Lincoln's "Nays" entertained 
at the free swim at the Codman Pool, 

-As usual, Betty Smith's tennis tournament was a huge 
success. 

-The lobster/ chicken barbeque was a huge success, enjoyed 
by over 600 Townspeople. 

-While a crowd estimated at almost 7000 gathered to watch 
the fireworks, Diana Ryan and her friends again presented 
a model rocketry display enjoyed by all who waited for 
dusk. Then the fireworks delighted all. What a finale!! 

See y'all in '891 



118 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION 



John R. Benson 

Elizabeth C. Donaldson 

Colin M. Smith 

Mary G. Spindler 

John W. Carman, Chairman 



The Massachusetts Historical Commission advised the Town 
that the Woods End Historic District had been approved for 
listing on the National Register of Historic Places. This 
approval results in having all three Lincoln Historic Districts 
included in the National Register. 

During the early part of the year the Commission 
participated in and supported the overall Town efforts that 
successfully resisted the application by Boston Properties for a 
major widening of Old County Road and its intersection with 
Winter Street. It is undoubtably wishful thinking to feel that 
the matter is resolved and that the problem will not return in 
some form in the future. 



The Commission supports the proposal which is to come before 
the 1989 Town Meeting that will preserve Flint Fields as open 
space. In the event of a favorable Town Meeting vote the 
Historical Commission will then recommend that Flint Fields be 
included in the Lincoln Center Historic District. 



119 



HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 



F. Douglas Adams 

John R. Benson 

Elizabeth D. Corcoran 

Elizabeth C. Donaldson 

Colin M. Smith 

Mary G. Spindler 

John W. Carman, Chairman 

Kenneth E. Hurd, Alternate 
Kim Kassner, Alternate 



In the past year hearings were held on nine applications for 
Certificates of Appropriateness covering additions or exterior 
changes to structures within the Historic Districts. After 
discussion and agreement with respect to generally minor plan 
modifications Certificates of Appropriateness were issued on all 
but one application. 

The Commission approved the design of the handicapped ramp 
to Pierce House as an ingenious and effective solution that 
meets the state code and makes easy access for everyone. 

The Commission continues to oversee the exterior design 
features of the Library. Construction has progressed to the 
stage where all can see that the project fits the site, ties 
well with the original building, and is an addition consistent 
in quality with other Town buildings in the vicinity. 



120 



CODMAN COMMUNITY FARMS, INC. 



Peter Conrad 
Suze Craig 

Elizabeth Donaldson, Clerk 

James Henderson, Vice President 

Mary Lincoln 

David M. Hill 

Margaret B. Marsh 

Roy M. Raja, Treasurer 

Paul Svetz 

Fan Watkinson 

Carol Wolff 

Clifton V. Rice, President 

Stanley D. White, Farmer/Manager 

Codman Community Farms, Inc., had a busy and productive 
growing season, made many long-term improvements in fields, 
barns and pastures, and received significant regional 
recognition for its minor breeds livestock program in 1988. 

After the lambing and calving season was behind us early 
in the spring, we turned our attention to making improvements in 
the pasture areas adjacent to the barns. The pasture behind 
Doherty's Garage was reclaimed through extensive brushclearing, 
followed by liming, fertilizing and seeding. New fencing was 
installed, and permanent pens were redesigned and constructed to 
accommodate a dozen feeder pigs, our Tamworth boar and sow, and 
their piglets. These and other improvements to the barns and 
general premises around them were completed in time for the very 
successful "May Merriments" celebration of spring, put on by CCF 
and the Lincoln Players. New plumbing was installed to serve 
the milkhouse, and, later in the year, a long-needed new roof 
was installed on the barns, thanks to the Town. 

Our field improvement program continued with the reseeding 
of alfalfa and timothy on eleven acres at Farrar Village and six 
acres at Far Meadow. On these fields, and on the 
recently-reclaimed Codman Hill, the lush growth of new planting 
exceeded our expectations, producing hay of very high quality. 
In fact, soil tests completed this fall indicate that, after six 
years of intensive lime application, fertilization and care, all 
98 acres of the hay fields we work have never been in better 
condition. All have achieved the proper pH, and no lime should 
be necessary for the next couple of seasons. 

Despite the prolonged hot, muggy weather in July and 
August, making for grueling work for the CCF staff, a bumper 
crop of over 10,000 bales of excellent quality hay was produced 
on these fields. And the hard work rewarded us again this year 
with a barnful of the best-quality hay available for sale in the 
local area. 



121 



CCF benefited from increased public awareness of our 
efforts to preserve rare breeds of livestock, through articles 
in the Boston Globe and the Lincoln Journal , and in a segment 
aired in November on the World Monitor television news program. 
This exposure brought more visitors, photographers and farmers 
than ever before to look at our Lineback, Milking Devon and 
Belted Galloway cattle, our Tamworth pigs, and our Border 
Leicester and Scottish Blackface sheep. We had steady supplies 
of grass-fed, naturally-raised meats for sale all year, and we 
established a continuing marketing program and a self-service 
center in the milkhouse to take advantage of increased public 
interest in these products. 

The annual CCF Harvest Fair, made possible by countless 
volunteers, donations and general goodwill, offered a day of 
outdoor fun, demonstrations, exhibits and good eating for Town 
and area visitors. CCF thanks the numerous families who donated 
items for the auction, and who helped build displays, prepare 
and serve food, run games and activities, put on the traditional 
lamb barbecue, and helped the fair be a tremendous success and 
produce a significant contribution to the cost of running the 
farm. 

Codman Community Farms and its membership take pride in 
continuing the three-century tradition of using Lincoln's open 
lands for productive, conscientiously-managed farming, an 
example of working agriculture increasingly rare in suburban 
towns. 



122 



CODMAN COMMUNITY FARMS, INC. 



Statement of Revenues, Expenses and Changes in Fund Balances 
Years ended November 30, 1988 and 1987 



Operating revenues: 


1988 


1987 


oaj.es . 






Hay 


$ 24,623 


$ 26,144 


Vegetable crops 


2,090 


3,086 


Livestock 


18,268 


24,534 


Custom work 


7,641 


7,361 


Purchased items resold 


1,313 


1,310 


Total Sales 


53,935 


62,435 


Dues 


5,516 


3,935 


Garden Plot fees 


*745 


*865 


Fair 


12,674 


7,454 


U.S.D.A. cost sharing 


43 


1,496 


Interest 


1,039 


1,343 


Other 


51 


685 


Total operating revenues 


74,003 


78,213 


Operating expenses: 






Labor and related costs 


31,101 


42,463 


Seed and livestock 


8,489 


4,704 


Fertilizer and lime 


6,640 


8,158 


Repairs 


6,845 


5,043 


Depreciation 


8,091 


7,335 


Feed 


5,294 


4,484 


Fair 


3,565 


3,212 


Rentals 


1,533 


1,743 


Supplies 


(214) 


548 


Water 


825 


843 


Fuel 


1,841 


1,619 


J-liOU L ClilLC j L. d A. C O dllVJ. J_ C C O 


781 


1 331 


Freight and utilities 


580 


592 


Legal and accounting 


1,007 


866 


Office supplies and expense 


2,271 


1,746 


Total operating expenses 


78,649 


84,687 


Operating income (loss) 


(4,646) 


(6,474 


Non-operating revenue (expenses): 






Unrestricted gift 


10,760 


16 000 


Endowments 


1,150 


4,556 


Gain (loss)-disposition of equipment 457 


163 


Total non-operating revenues 


12,367 


20,719 


Excess revenues (expenses) 


7,721 


14,245 


Fund Balances at beginning of year 


79,617 


65,372 


Fund Balances at end of year 


$ 87,338 


$ 79,617 



123 



CODMAN COMMUNITY FARMS, INC. 



Balance Sheet 
November 30, 1988 and 1987 

Assets 

1988 1987 

Current assets: 

Cash $ 18,377 $ 24,837 

Accounts receivable 2,572 834 

Inventory 25,293 16,540 

- Total current assets 46,242 42,211 

Property and equipment, at cost: 

Structures 16,380 12,023 

Motor vehicles and wagons 15,102 14,576 

Farm implements 35,296 32,786 

Livestock 1,095 795 

67,873 60,180 

Less accumulated depreciation 30,434 24,438 

Net property and equipment 37,439 35, 742 

Other assets - Endowment funds 5 , 706 4 ,556 

$ 89,387 $ 82,509 



Liabilities and Fund Balances 

Current liabilities: 

Accounts payable $ 1,138 $ 2,067 

Accrued expenses 911 825 

Total liabilities 2,049 2,892 

Fund balances: 

Unrestricted funds 44,193 39,319 

Endowment funds 5,706 4,556 

Property and equipment funds 37,439 35,742 

Total fund balances $ 87,338 $ 79,617 

$ 89,387 $ 82,509 



See accompanying notes to financial statements. 



124 



ROUTE 128 AREA COMMITTEE 



Susan Carr 

Terry Fenton 

Earl Flansburgh 

John Hammond (resigned) 

Rollin Johnson 

John Ritsher 

Edward Schwartz 

Richard Wiggin 

Beth Sutherland, Chairman 

Two major threats to the Town of Lincoln and its quality 
of life arose in 1986 and dominated the activities of the 
Committee during 1987 and again for a substantial portion of 
1988. The threats were attenuated during the summer of 1988, 
but the issues remain essentially unresolved for the future. 

Without doubt the threat posed by Boston Properties' 
actions generated the most support amongst Townspeople of any 
issue within recent memory. The threat was their plans to build 
an office complex of more than one million square feet in 
Waltham on the Lincoln line. In order to provide access to 
their development, they initiated a petition to the Middlesex 
County Commissioners to widen substantial portions of Old County 
Road and Winter Street in Lincoln and Waltham. A series of 
citizens' petitions were subsequently filed with the 
Commissioners seeking discontinuance of a section of Old County 
Road in both communities in order to protect the residential 
neighborhoods from traffic impacts. 

A traffic study by consultant Walter Freeman predicted 
that if the entire Boston Properties office complex and all four 
phases of the Bay Colony Corporate Center were built and 
occupied, the resulting traffic backup at the five corners in 
Lincoln Center would be one and a third miles in length, with 
cars waiting up to 20 minutes at rush hour. The message was 
clear, and the Townspeople responded accordingly. The first 
hearing on the petitions took place on December 1, 1987 and was 
followed by four more hearings: February 2, April 5, June 7, 
and July 11, 1988. In each instance hundreds of citizens, 
primarily from Lincoln but from neighboring towns as well, 
turned out to voice their opposition to Boston Properties' 
plans. In addition, the Commissioners received over 400 letters 
opposing the widening petitions. The Committee, together with 
the Selectmen, orchestrated this heartening response by means of 
extensive publicity and Townwide mailings. 

Lending their voices to this chorus was an impressive 
array of government officials and different organizations which 
had been contacted by Town board members, the Committee or 
Townspeople. The list included state senators and 
representatives, the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority, 



125 



the Executive Office of Environmental Affairs, the Metropolitan 
Area Planning Council, the City of Cambridge, the Towns of 
Bedford, Concord, Lexington, and Weston, the Massachusetts 
Audubon Society, neighborhood associations and others. The 
primary issues raised were the overwhelming effects of traffic 
and the potential harm to the Cambridge Reservoir. 

Faced with such a controversial issue, the Commissioners 
hired a consulting firm, Environmental Resources Management, to 
assist them. The firm's initial report was sharply criticized, 
and the Commissioners' final decision did not reflect the 
report's findings. Rather, the Commissioners agreed with the 
position articulated by the Town of Lincoln. Lincoln argued 
successfully that Boston Properties had not demonstrated, as is 
required by statute, that common convenience and necessity 
required widening the roads. Further, the Town stated that the 
rapid pace of development in the Winter Street/Route 128 area 
and attendant traffic overload signalled a need for 
comprehensive planning. On July 11 the Commissioners voted to 
deny all petitions before them and to initiate a regional 
planning effort in conjunction with the Metropolitan Area 
Planning Council. At year's end this effort was still in its 
initial stages, and Boston Properties' future plans for the Old 
County Road site were unknown. 

While waging the battle with Boston Properties, the 
Committee and the Selectmen closely followed the plans being 
formulated by Bay Colony. On March 14, 1988, Bay Colony 
representatives appeared before the Waltham City Council to urge 
support of their request for a revised permit for Phase II of 
their office park. Lincoln testified against the request, 
arguing that the traffic data submitted was outdated and 
inaccurate, and that the project did not comply with the 
provisions of the city's zoning ordinance. 

When Lincoln officials learned that the City Council had 
approved the permit for Phase II, they filed suit in the Land 
Court to annul the permit. The suit was not heard, however, as 
Lincoln was able to reach an agreement with Bay Colony out of 
court. This agreement prohibits Bay Colony and any subsequent 
owner from utilizing any back door access to its property via 
Old County Road for 15 years and imposes significant 
restrictions on such action for the period thereafter. Although 
the agreement provides protection for the time being, the Town 
must remain vigilant to any changes which could negate the 
provisions. 

Other proposed developements in the Winter Street area 
were brought before the Waltham City Council, but, for the first 
time in recent years, several were rejected because of the 
traffic impacts they would impose. The Committee was heartened 
by the Council's increasing awareness of the effects of intense 



126 



commercial development. However, there were no assurances that 
under the city's zoning ordinance, which is currently being 
revised, future projects would not exacerbate existing traffic 
problems. 

Another potential threat loomed on the western edge of 
town in 1988, ironically again posed by Boston Properties. The 
firm proposed to construct a 130,000 square foot office park at 
the intersection of Routes 2 and 126 in Concord. Nationwide 
publicity focused on the fact that the site was part of Walden 
Woods and adjacent to Walden Pond. However, Lincoln officials 
recognized the potential traffic impacts of yet another 
commercial development on our borders and notified the Executive 
Office of Environmental Affairs of their concern. The Office 
yielded to the protestations of many individual citizens as well 
as groups and required an environmental impact report for the 
project, particularly in regards to traffic. The report must 
incorporate analysis of traffic along Route 2 east to Bedford 
Road, and Route 126 south to Route 117. The Committee is 
grateful to all the townspeople for their untiring support in 
fighting Boston Properties' petitions. The quality of life 
which we seek to protect is in no small measure the unique 
quality of those individuals who reside in the community. 



127 



BEMIS HALL ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



Barbara Beal 
Debra Haiduvan 
Ruth Kramer 
John Manzelli 
Daniel Spaeth 

Eleanor M. Wilfert, Chairman 

After a request from the Selectmen to review the policy of 
the use of the Hall, rules and regulations, application form, 
and use of the kitchen and fee structure, the Committee met 
several times during the summer to discuss these issues. 

As a result, with recommendations from the Committee and 
the Selectmen's further minor changes, new application and 
regulations forms were drawn up and are now being used. 

In the Spring of 1988, the Men's Room had a few minor 
plumbing repairs before the floor was recovered and some stage 
lights were installed in Upper Bemis with more to come. 

During the course of the year, several minor improvements 
have been made throughout the building for safety and appearance. 

The Committee will continue to meet periodically throughout 
the year, at the request of the Selectmen, to keep them informed 
of any problems that may arise. 



128 



METROPOLITAN AREA PLANNING COUNCIL 



William G. Constable, Representative 

The Metropolitan Area Planning Council continues to serve as 
the planning agency for the region which includes Lincoln. 
During fiscal year 1988, which runs from July 1, 1987 through 
June 30, 1988, Lincoln contributed .1854 cents per capita, or 
$1,384.00 to MAPC for regional planning services. 

With the support of Lincoln and 100 other communities in the 
metropolitan Boston area, MAPC provided planning services, 
information and advice for sub-regional and region-wide 
initiatives in the areas of land use, economic development, 
housing, transportation and environmental quality. 

Projects completed during calendar year 1988 and of direct 
benefit to Lincoln include: 

MAPC staff reviewed a generic Environmental Impact 
Report on Massport's improvements to Hanscom Field, and 
continued coordinating environmental review of proposals 
affecting Lincoln; 

MAPC organized the North Suburban Planning council to 
address local issues which cross two borders. Together 
with the Minuteman Area Governmental Interlocal Committee 
formed two years ago, this subregional group provides 
another forum for discussing inter-town issues; 

Local officials were invited to a MAPC Legislative 
Breakfast to hear state legislators discuss regional 
priorities; and 

MAPC assisted the Middlesex County Commissioners in the 
deliberations concerning Old County Road and have 
established a dialogue for considering regional solutions 
to traffic problems along Route 128 and adjacent roads. 

Regionally, MAPC continued to work on MetroPlan 2000, the 
agency's comprehensive plan, developing new population, 
employment and retail trade forecasts; an inventory of more than 
600 vacant commercial and industrial sites; and several resource 
papers on affordable housing issues, regional transportation 
improvements and land use projects. 

MAPC also worked for additional funds for local pavement 
management programs and coordinated the local TIP review, which 
provided federal funds for local highway projects. 

Finally, MAPC completed prototype projects which are 
applicable to all communities. For example, in Cambridge the 
agency developed a transportation management zoning report which 
provides land use recommendations designed to reduce 
site-related traffic. 



129 



LINCOLN PERSONNEL BOARD 



Sam Donnell 

Scott Lathrop 

Joanne Hadlock, Chairman 

This year, the Personnel Board has been primarily involved 
with implementing the new job classification system developed 
during the previous year in conjunction with Olney Associates. 
There have been relatively few questions and challenges to the 
system, most of which have been resolved smoothly and 
satisfactorily. 

The Personnel Board has used the established guidelines to 
describe, classify and rank newly created Town positions as well 
as presently existing part-time positions not previously 
classified. The relative ease with which such personnel matters 
have been conducted, coupled with the consensus which has 
occurred in implementing the classification guidelines, have 
been most gratifying. They confirm the value of the personnel 
study in insuring equity within Town positions. 

The challenge in the coming year seems to focus on 
clarifying the classification procedures to both managers and 
employees to avoid misunderstanding regarding criteria for step 
and salary increments. Another issue now able to be addressed 
is the development of guidelines and possible training 
procedures regarding performance appraisal reviews. 

The Board is grateful to all Town employees and especially 
to supervisors for their support in the final stages of 
implementing the results of the Olney study. 



130 



Schools, Library and Recreation 



TRUSTEES OF THE LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY 



Term Expires 



Craig Hill 
Barbara Low 



Douglas Harding 



Self -Perpetuating 
Self-Perpetuating 
Elected 



1989 
1990 
1991 



Walter Salmon 

Carol White 

Mary Newman, Chairman 



Selectmen Appointee 
School Committee Appointee 
Self -Perpetuating 



OVERVIEW 

The Lincoln Library has been an important part of the 
community in its temporary location as the ongoing services have 
been available on the same basis. Patrons and staff are 
anticipating the return to the old Library with its new and 
expanded facilities. 

BUILDING PROGRAM 

Construction has proceeded all during the year with few 
delays, and it is planned that the new building will open during 
the Spring of 1989. 

MINUTEMAN LIBRARY NETWORK 

The Network had an upgrade in equipment, paid for by the 
State, which will allow an on-line catalog by the Summer of 1989. 



Carol White was reappointed by the School Committee for a 
term of three years to expire in 1991. 



One member of the staff left during 1988 - Margaret Green. 
She was replaced by Lisa Acker Rothenberg. 



There were 302 programs for adults and children during the 
year with 5,312 in attendance. 

Ellen Cannon and Ethel MacKenzie presented the Wednesday 
Morning Programs for their sixteenth year. They continued to 
find local talent and interest for these varied popular programs. 



TRUSTEES 



STAFF 



PROGRAMS 



131 



The theme for the Friday Morning Book Group was "Comic 
Spirit". It was well attended again this year. A new group was 
formed for the reading of Shakespearean plays. 

The Children's Summer Program was entitled "Go Wild This 
Summer" and concentrated on animals and their habits. 



FRIENDS 



The Trustees are continually appreciative of the support of 
the Lincoln Library Friends. Their active group works 
throughout the year to provide services beyond what the yearly 
budget can offer. Their contributions include three museum 
passes - to the Aquarium, the Children's Museum and the Museum 
of Science; funding for Summer and special programs for the 
children; maintainance of the copy machine; a monthly book sale 
at Bemis Hall which has grown in popularity and financial gain; 
jazz programs featuring both recorded and live music; 
refreshments for various events including an annual party for 
the staff and volunteers; joint sponsorship of the Wednesday 
Morning Programs; and a very successful Lincoln Musicians Night 
at Pierce House in May. 



GIFTS 



The Library gratefully acknowledged gits from several 
residents during the year. Donations were received from the 
Barron Family; Douglas S. Dillman in memory of his wife, 
Virginia, for books on tape and other materials for the visually 
impaired; Dudley and Georgene Hershbach who have established the 
Hershbach Fund for the Arts; Mary S. Newman for purchase of 
large print books; and Mr. and Mrs. William Payne whose gift was 
matched by Digital Equipment Corporation; and John Wofford who 
donated a piano. 



WEDNESDAY MORNING AT THE LIBRARY, 1988 



January 13 "Harbor Seals in Maine: The Life of a Field 
Biologist" with Leslie Cowperthwaite 



February 10 "Levitation — In Spirit and Substance" with 
Dudley R. Herschbach 



March 9 "Save the Lights" with Peg Marsh 



April 13 "Glimpses of the Soviet Union" with Guido and 

Joan Perera 



October 12 "Nature Books and More at the Hathaway Library' 

with Martha Cohen 



November 16 "Diana" with Diana Golden 



132 



STAFF, 1988 



Kathy Glick-Weil 
Ellen Sisco 
Margaret Green 
Lisa Acker Rothenberg 
Amy Gavalis 
Jane Flanders 
Virginia Chang 
Mary Collins 
Shelia Williams 
Kathy Rushby 
Audrey Dedinsky 
Kathie Brobeck 
Mary Spindler 
Dana Weigent 
John Bottino 
Robert Bottino 



Librarian 

Assistant Librarian 

Technical Services Librarian (Jan - Aug) 

Technical Services Librarian (Sept -) 

Children's Librarian 

Children's Librarian 

Reference Librarian 

Library Technician 

Assistant Children's Librarian 

Senior Library Assistant/Bookkeeper 

Clerk/Typist 

Circulation Assistant 

Circulation Assistant 

Children's Room Assistant 

Custodian 

Custodian 



HOURS, 1988 



Monday, Wednesday, Thursday 

Tuesday, Friday 

Saturday 

Closed Sundays 



9:00 am to 8:30 pm 
9:00 am to 6:00 pm 
10:00 am to 5:00 pm except 
during July & August 



LIBRARY PAGES, 1988 



Anne Althausen 
Persis Barron 
Katie Basch 
Michelle Boisvert 
Vaughan Chou 
Diane Ciaramglia 
Joyce Dietmeier 
Ruth Dietmeier 



Neil Fitzgerald 
Joe Greeson 
Chris Hayes 
Joel Higgins 
Shauna Lo 
Sarah Ludden 
Dori Phelps-Braun 
Demare Rankin 



LIBRARY VOLUNTEERS, 1988 

Patty Arena 
Ellen Cannon 
Eleanor Donaldson 
B. Grim 
Linda Holland 
Jane Lang ton 
Ethel MacKenzie 
Sally Mansfield 
Margaret Marsh 



Milt Page 
Bill Poisson 
Barbara Roche 
Peggy Schmertzler 
Barbara Sisson 
Elizabeth Snelling 
Phyllis Swift 
Ed Williams 



And a Special thanks to: Friends of the Lincoln Library and 
Dawn Murphy. 



133 



The Library is grateful to the many people who gave books and 
records to support the collection during the year. They 
include: 



Rand Alexander 

John Armstrong 

Mark & Jamie Banks 

Bruce Bare 

Enid Beal 

"Beyond War" 

Jerry Black 

John Boyer 

Elaine Briggs 

Denise Browne 

Mary Cabot 

Cannon Family 

Marion Christy 

Pat Clark 

J. R. Clarke 

Abigail Congdon 

Kits Culver 

Lee Dane 

Zella Dewey 

Jennifer Donaldson 

J. Russell Elkinton 

Diane Fairbanks 

Eva Freeman 

John Garrison 

Ted Grosshart 

Dick Hale 

Mary Ann Hales 

Ruth & Norman Hapgood 

Eric Harris 

Jeanne Healy 

Barry Hershey 

Burton Holmes 



Hubbard Family 

Allie & Jerome Hunsaker 

Gladys Johnson 

Dorothy Kano 

Charles Kindleberger 

Steven Kitses 

Maribeth Klobuchar 

Jane Lang ton 

Dunbar Lockwood 

Ludwig Luft 

Robert Mack 

Margaret Marsh 

Mrs. Moore 

Lenny Moss 

Daisy Newman 

Mary Newman 

Bea Page 

Roy & Ellen Raja 
Henry Rugo 
Mr. & Mrs. Schwann 
Don Seckler 
Mary Spindler 
Nancy Stratton 
Marjorie Stiker 
Phyllis Swift 
Mrs. Taft 
Win Walker 
Patricia Warner 
Ruth Warner 
Bruce Wellman 
Richard Wengren 
Bella Wheeler 



Magazine Gift Subscriptions were received from the following 
people: 



Kits Culver 
Ruth Hapgood 
Roger Harris 
Ludwig Luft 
Alice McKennan 



Merv Moore 
Roy Raja 
William Ryan 
Irving Telling 



134 



STATISTICS, 1988 



General : 



Number of days open 192 
Fines Collected $3,270.98 

Acquisitions : 

Books 

Inventory 1987 63,976 

Purchases 3,488 

Gifts 149 

Total Inventory 67,613 

Discarded or Lost -957 

Inventory 1988 66,656 

Books on Tape 

Inventory 1987 117 

Purchases 42 

Gifts _0 

Total Inventory 159 

Discarded or Lost -5 

Inventory 1988 154 

Records, Tapes, CD's, and A-V 

Inventory 1987 2,628 

Purchases 606 

Gifts 15 

Total Inventory 3,249 

Discarded or Lost -60 

Inventory 1988 3,189 

Circulation: 

Adult Books 36,431 

Children's Books 31,421 

All Other Materials 14,052 

Total Circulation, 1988 81,904 

Programs: 

Adult Programs 35 

Children's Programs 245 

Non-Library Groups 22 

Total Programs 302 

Attendance 

Adult 989 

Children's 4,193 

Non-Library Groups 130 

Total Attendance 5,312 



135 



DE CORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 

Board of Trustees 

Joseph Bower 

Robert Brannen 

Irene Briedis 

John B. French 

Robert Frank 

Lynn Gargill 

James Hopson 

Steven Manos 

Meredyth Moses 

Francis Moulton, Jr., Clerk 

David Ogden 

Julia Pugh 

Ruth Scheer 

Barbara Sisson 

Arthur J. Stavaridis 

Carmen Verrier, Vice President 

Margaret L. Wengren 

John R. White, Treasurer 

Gregory Harney, President 

PRESIDENT'S REPORT, 1988 

Gregory Harney, President 

As we begin a new year we are pleased to report that the 
DeCordova and Dana Park & Museum had achieved a new pinnacle of 
management and financial stability by the end of 1988. We have 
also continued to have positive reaction from the press and the 
general public to our exhibitions of the past year. 

There were two events this year of great and long-term 
significance to the Museum. The first of these was the 
re-accreditation of the Museum by the American Association of 
Museums (AAM). We are proud and delighted to have this 
endorsement of our institution and its operations by the major 
national organization which serves the museum profession. 

The second significant event was a major award in February 
by the National Arts Stabilization Fund - (NASF). Again, this 
was the result of an extensive examination of the Museum's 
operations by the granting organization, and entails a number of 
challenges. This expression of confidence in the Museum is 
particularly exciting, and we have already met one of the 
challenges set by NASF - raising sufficient funds to match a 
portion of the award. This was accomplished by a special 
fundraising effort this Spring resulting in gifts of over 
$50,000.00 from Trustees and other generous supporters of 
DeCordova. We are especially grateful to the Director and staff 
who worked hard to qualify for this grant, and who ensure its 
planning and development requirements will be met. 



136 



In addition to the NASF grant, the Director and staff 
continue to achieve considerable success in securing grants from 
foundations, state and federal arts organizations for specific 
exhibitions as well as unrestricted grants for the collection 
and storage problems that are of ongoing concern. There are no 
guarantees that these grants can become a dependable source of 
revenue, but the staff has shown considerable expertise in 
acquiring grants in a very competitive area of museum life. 

The DeCordova School, under the able leadership of Eleanor 
Lazarus, and its excellent faculty and diverse curriculum are 
operating at full capacity. The Museum School has traditionally 
offered classes in all major fine arts and arts crafts 
disciplines, and new classes and workshops were added to the 
curriculum. School ennrollments climbed to 3,500 - the highest 
annual attendance registered in over ten years. Students ranged 
in age from two years to 80 years, and in ability from beginners 
to professional artists. Again this year, the Museum School 
maintained its commitment to be a non-degree granting program 
geared to serve a broad public, though undergraduate and 
graduate college credit may be obtained through the 
Massachusetts College of Art. 

In the Fall of 1987, a Student Advisory Council was formed 
to serve as liaison between the student body and the School 
Administration, informing both themselves and fellow students 
about the Museum's operations and plans. The 6-member Council 
represents the varied disciplines taught at the School and 
offers suggestions and recommendations from fellow students 
regarding the School curriculum, facilities and studio programs. 

Formation of the Council was but one aspect of an overall 
planning initiative undertaken this year to study curriculum, 
introduce greater course stratification, diversify workshop and 
intensive programs, facilitate new faculty recruitment, and 
further integrate Museum School and Museum programming. A 
series of planning recommendations addressing all these issues 
is scheduled for implementation with the 1988-89 academic year. 

A continuing concern of the Museum School is to create 
exposure for the work of students and other local artists to 
enhance the public's appreciation of the value of studio art 
education. To this end the "Art in the Park" festival was 
created. Held in June, the 1988 event was the most successful 
ever, with more artists participating than ever before and 3,500 
people in attendance for the day long program of music, 
performances, studio demonstrations, and educational activities. 

The development efforts of the Museum witnessed 
unprecedented success in fiscal year 1988. Spurred by the 
substantial grant award of the National Arts Stabilization Fund, 
and the establishment of working capital reserves which it made 
possible, additional impetus was lent to the Annual Appeal 



137 



campaign which was already the Museum's most successful ever. 
Under the effective Chairmanship of Trustee Steve Manos, the 
Annual Appeal realized a 12 percent increase in operating 
support funds over the previous year. The resulting net 
operating surplus is the largest in the Museum's history and 
greatly increases the administration's ability to deal with 
pressing physical plant and depreciation issues. 

Over the past several years the Board of Trustees has been 
interviewing prospective candidates to fill vacant board 
positions. These efforts to find qualified, interested people 
from the town and region have shown, and will continue to show 
positive results in the next three to six months, and we should 
reach our goal of having a full complement of 21 Trustees. 

During the next year the Trustee's attention will focus on 
solving the problems of an aging physical plant and improvements 
that will permit attracting exhibitions now denied us due to 
lack of climate control in the main galleries. We must resolve 
the problem of inadequate storage space for the Museum's 
permanent collection, which continues to grow in quantity and 
quality. We must also meet current standards for access to the 
Museum for the handicapped. 

In solving these problems we are embarking on a period of 
long range planning and a much needed capital funds drive to 
maintain this remarkable town resource for the education and 
enjoyment of its families. 

This report would be incomplete if it did not recognize the 
contributition of Jack French during his four years as President 
of the Board of Trustees. He gave unstintingly of his time and 
energy, and the Museum's current status of fiscal soundness and 
managerial excellence is due in good measure to his guidance. 

DIRECTOR'S REPORT 

Paul Master-Karnik, Director 

The success of an art museum today is frequently measured 
in the quantitative terras of visitor attendance at exhibitions, 
numbers enrolled in educational programs, the volume of 
postcards and catalogs sold, or the size of a surplus from the 
year's operating budget. The past year at DeCordova has 
witnessed substantial advances in all these categories. Yet, as 
gratifying as the statistics are in terras of documenting the 
health of the museum, they convey only part of the whole picture 
regarding DeCordova 's vitality. The guiding theme of all this 
year's activities has been to generate greater public 
appreciation of existing strengths and programs, while planning 
for critically needed future development that will see DeCordova 
successfully enter the next decade. 



138 



The 1987-88 year's schedule of changing exhibitions 
illustrated with particular clarity the distinctive mission of 
the DeCordova Museum to introduce important aspects of modern 
and contemporary American art, focused on the work of New 
England artists, to a broad public audience. The five major 
exhibitions presented during this period included two group 
exhibitions of contemporary New England artists, two one-person 
exhibitions documenting the artists' careers over several 
decades, and a large traveling exhibition surveying the history 
of instant photography since the 1950 's. Increasingly, works 
from the Permanent Collection were integrated into the 
exhibitions as part of an effort to give greater exposure to the 
Museum's holdings and to creatively interpret the developing 
history of modern art in New England to audiences here. Both 
critical and public response was strong, with exhibition 
attendance registering a strong 10 percent increase over the 
prior year. 

V/hile exhibitions are perhaps the most visible of 
DeCordova 's public programs, there is much that goes on behind 
the scenes at an art museum. Though less noted, many of these 
activities are equally important. For example, major advances 
were made in the area of collections management which is the 
core responsibility of any art museum. These included making 
some important acquisitions, completing the Museum's three-year 
conservation master plan, and formulating comprehensive 
Collections Management Policies to reflect current professional 
practices. These advances were commended in the official 
periodic reaccreditation of the Museum by the American 
Association of Museums. The self-study and professional peer 
review process of reaccreditation confirmed the Museum 
status as an institution operating in conformity with 
established national standards, and reaffirmeed the commitment 
of the staff and Trustees to maintain the quality of DeCordova 's 
program in representing the contemporary art of New England. 

As the pace of real estate and business development 
continues to accelerate and demographic patterns change in the 
Greater Boston metropolitan area, issues of open space and 
public art become ever more crucial. The Sculpture Park at 
DeCordova draws significant audiences during each season, and a 
number of new works were added this year for temporary 
exhibition. Intensive planning efforts, which involved bringing 
the directors of other sculpture parks from across the country 
to consult with the Museum's curators, have been initiated this 
year. DeCordova has the opportunity to become a major showplace 
for contemporary outdoor sculpture in New England. The Park is 
also the site, in the Museum Amphitheatre, of the "Jazz at 
DeCordova" concerts which have become the most important 
summer-long festival of jazz music in greater Boston. 



139 



The Museum's development and planning efforts also received 
impressive national recognition with the receipt in February of 
a grant of $433,500 from the National Arts Stabilization Fund, 
in collaboration with the Greater Boston Arts Fund. Fund awards 
are designed to provide distinguished arts organizations with 
enhanced long-term economic stability to nurture artistic 
growth. These successful efforts have been coupled with the 
extensive reorganization of the standing committees of the Board 
of Trustees to facilitate the long range planning process of the 
Museum - a process which is focused upon both immediate and 
future physical plant and staffing resource needs. DeCordova's 
aging museum building, issues of accessibility, climate control 
security, and the care of both the art and the public within the 
exhibition galleries, are all receiving careful study by teams 
of Trustees and staff members. 

Computerization has come to DeCordova. Initiated in 1985 
with the generously subsidized assistance of American 
Fundraising Services, the overall computerization project of the 
Museum has proceeded with the aquisition of progressively 
greater in-house capabilities. The computerization of the 
development, accounting and public relations departments was 
accomplished this year, with funds provided by a generous grant 
from anonymous donors. These same donors in 1987 made a gift to 
the Museum of $250,000 to form the DeCordova Endowment Trust, 
the funds from which have enabled us this fiscal year to 
establish a permanent Outreach Program and staff position at 
DeCordova - an important, needed component to accomplish the 
educational mission of the Museum and to work more aggressively 
with local school systems. 

The accomplishments of the past year, and the extraordinary 
commitment of DeCordova Trustees, staff, volunteers, and 
benefactors who have brought these goals to fruition, have 
enabled us to begin to create a vision for the further 
development of DeCordova's great artistic and educational 
potential. Special mention must be made of the dedication of 
two retiring officers of the Board, President Jack French and 
Treasurer James Hopson, both of whom have been exceptionally 
generous of their time and expertise in helping to guide 
DeCordova through some of the most eventful and difficult years 
in its 38-year history. Their efforts, along with those of many 
others, have brought the Museum to a new threshold of 
possibility. Dreams which would have seemed but fantasy a few 
years ago are now being planned for and realistically 
implemented in systematic fashion. These plans will ensure the 
future of the DeCordova Museum and reaffirm its responsibility 
to the audiences of today and to those of future generations. 



140 



DE CORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 
Museum Staff (as of December 1988) 



Administration 

Paul Master-Karnik, Ph.D., Director 
Joan Kennedy, Assistant to the Director 
Franco Riello, Accountant 

Curatorial 

Rachel Rosenfield Lafo, Senior Curator 
Saundra Goldman, Assistant Curator 
Lynn Traub, Registrar 
Heather Lenz, Preparator 
Frank Balduf, Special Projects 

Education 

Eleanor Lazarus, Associate Director 
Linda Foster, School Manager 
Carole Somol, Docent Coordinator 
Nancy Ketterer, Docent Instructor 
Judith Sachs, Administrative Assistant 
Robena Reid, Art Supply Store Manager 
Gayle Rich, Performing Arts Coordinator 
Barbara Stecher, Research Assistant 

Development 

Denise Trapani, Associate Director, Development 
Susan Kapilian, Assistant Director, Development 
Carol Smyers, Administrative Assistant 
Jeron Weinand, Membership Director 

Judith Hall, Membership Secretary/Volunteer Coordinator 

Toni Cantlin, Membership Clerk 

Ellen Primack, Public Relations Director 

Barbara Barry, Functions Coordinator 

Ellen Cohen, Functions Manager 

George Vasquez, Photographer 

Nancy Glazer, Design Assistant 

Barry Higgins, Mail Room Clerk 

June Ekstrom, Weekend Manager 

Reception 
Lise Dalton 
Janet Paulson 
Linda Kenney Vaill 

Security 
Ed Chisholm 
Pat Lynch 
Larry Scheinfeld 



141 



Corporate Program 

Roberta Gould, Corporate Program Director 

Kate Lufkin, Assistant Corporate Program Director 

Buildings and Grounds 

Robert Little, Manager 

Robert Bearchell, Assistant Manager 

Frank Priest, School Custodian 

Debbie Little, Housekeeping 



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146 



LINCOLN ARTS COUNCIL 



Trish Adams 
Irene Briedis 
Eleanor Friedman 
Rick Lee, Treasurer 
Julie Pugh 

Margaret-Ann Rice, Secretary 
Jane Cooper, Chairman 

The Lincoln Arts Council is very pleased that our Spring 
1988 grant recommendations were approved by the Massachusetts 
Arts Lottery Council. We received an allocation of $1,237 for 
arts and $695 for PASS. The following amounts were approved: 

*Lincoln Players - Lincoln May Merriments $350 
*After School Music Program - 

Performance of Beacon Brass Quintet $450 

*Brooks School - Performance of Storyteller $400 
*Society for the Preservation of New England 

Antiquities - Restoration of Gropius House $ 25 



The Arts Council held a fundraising event in early October. 
A Studio Tour of Lincoln artists attracted about 250 "tourists" 
to 17 different studio locations. The Arts Council received 
contributions for a map of the studio locations. The funds 
contributed will be used to augment state funding and to support 
activities for the arts in Lincoln. 

In October 1988, the Arts Council met to consider 
applications for the state funding grant allocation of $1,254 
and $319 for PASS. We approved a request for funding from the 
DeCordova Museum Outreach program for a grant of $225 for a 
slide program to augment their museum tours for school 
children. We also voted to approve $200 towards a request for 
$1,000 from the Sudbury Community Art Center for support of a 
concert featuring the Harvard-Radclif fe Orchestra. We received 
no applications for the PASS funds. 

*DeCordova Museum Outreach $225 
*Sudbury Community Art Council $200 

*Administrative expenses $ 30 



$1,225 



*Administrative expenses 



$ 12 



*Performing Arts Student Series (PASS) 
Hartwell School 
Brooks School 



$295 
$400 
"£695 



TOTAL GRANTS 



$455 



147 



These recommendations are pending approval at the state 
level in January 1989. The funds not granted out in October 
1988 can be held over until the spring of 1989. 



*Held over for Spring 1989 funding cycle 
*Previous grants not drawn in 1988 



$ 799 
$ 221.40 



*Performance Arts Students Series (PASS) 



$ 319 



*Fundraising 
*Expenses 



$1,750 
- $ 430.59 



Total Available Fund in Spring 1989 



$2,658.81 



The principle objectives of the Arts Lottery are (1) to 
promote and maintain the vitality of existing cultural 
resources, (2) to insure the continued contribution and value of 
these resources to the Commonwealth, the local communities and 
their residents, and (3) to involve as many citizens as possible 
in some aspect of cultural activity. Since Lincoln receives a 
relatively small allotment of lottery funds, the Lincoln Arts 
Council has adopted a policy of awarding grants to applications 
that will very directly benefit the community of Lincoln. 



148 



RECREATION COMMITTEE 



Monika Duborg 
Liza Evans 
George Seely 
John Walker 
Peter Watkinson 
John Adams, Chairman 

Debra Haiduven, Director 

This year was both a year of continuation and a year of 
change for the Recreation Committee. It was a year of 
continuation in terms of the recreation programs, which were 
much the same as in previous years, with the major ones being 
the summer day camp, the Codman Pool, the youth programs, and 
the tennis courts. It was a year of change in terms of 
personnel, with the Recreation Director, Lee Evans, leaving to 
take a similar post in Winchester, and longtime Committee member 
Rob Todd electing not to serve another term. Lee's position has 
been filled by Debra Haiduven, and while we were very sorry to 
lose Lee, we are very happy to have Debra, and expect that she 
will be very effective at carrying on the programs Lee started, 
as well as adding some new ones of her own. Rob's place has 
been filled by Peter Watkinson, whom some of you may have met at 
the tennis courts, and while we will miss Rob's deep commitment 
to the recreation program, Peter has been a welcome addition to 
the Committee. 

The Summer Day Camp continued to be popular this year with 
123 registrants for session 1, 126 for session 2, and 101 for 
session 3, for a grand total of 350. As with most recreation 
programs, this program was self-funding, with the camp tuition 
more than paying for the program. The camp was unable to use 
the school buildings this year due to the reroofing of the 
school, but will be able to use them next year. The Codman Pool 
was also well attended, with 288 seasonal memberships being 
sold. For the first time, the pool revenue exceeded the pool's 
operating cost, which has been a goal of the Committee since we 
took over management of the pool. We also succeeded in selling 
a record number of tennis stickers due to hiring a tennis 
monitor, who sold them at the tennis courts. The youth programs 
were well attended, with both the dances and the basketball 
program continuing to be popular. 



149 



We continued to offer a wide variety of smaller programs, 
such as trips to various events, lessons in tennis, golf, 
gymnastics and aerobics, and special events such as the fishing 
derby and the winter carnival. These programs were all funded 
out of user fees or put on by volunteers when no fee was 
charged. In closing, I would like to mention that the 
Recreation Committee, under the able leadership of John Walker, 
won the prize for Best Float in the Fourth of July Parade. 
Apparently, our portrayal of couch potatoes was so inspired that 
the judges felt that they had no choice but to award us the 
prize. 



150 



STRATS' PLACE PLAYGROUND COMMITTEE 



Mark Banks 
Becky Bartovics 
Mimsy Beckwith 
Libby Bradshaw 
Christina Brown 
Fred Carr 
Susan Carr 
Liza Evans 
Rainer Frost 
Terry Green 
Ton Hourihan 
Jodie Hunt 

Myron Kellner-Rogers 



Bruce MacNeil 
Linda MacNeil 
Sara Mattes 
Stephen Miller 
Diane Nockles 
Irene Rice 
Paul Rice 
Joe Robbat 
Stuart Rose 

Kathy Rushby, Treasurer 
Leslie Vagliano 
Page von Mertens, Coordinator 
Peter von Mertens, Coordinator 



Mikki Lipsey 

The Strats' Place Playground Committee was constituted by 
the Selectmen in November 1988 to plan and coordinate the 
building of a playground adjacent to the Lincoln Schools. The 
playground is named Strats' Place to honor Mike Stratton who 
tragically died in November 1987. Mike was a strong proponent 
of outdoor learning and challenging activities as a way of 
building self-confidence in children. His three children are 
students in the Lincoln Schools. Memorial gifts in Mike's name 
provided the seed money for the playground. 

The Committee has raised additional funds through individual 
contributions, sale of sun visors at the 4th of July parade, and 
sale of "Flexi-f lyers" . Rachel Wagner of Robert Leathers and 
Associates, Architects, came to the schools in December, met 
with the students, and has created from their design ideas a 
construction plan for the playground. 

During the Winter and Spring of 1989, the Committee will be 
reviewing the plans, incorporating design ideas from other 
community groups, fundraising, and recruiting and organizing the 
2000 volunteer shifts needed to build the playground. Our goal 
is to have 80% of the funds raised before Town Meeting. 

A warrant article will be presented at the Town Meeting 
asking the Town to accept the Strats' Place Playground as a gift 
to the Town. We are not asking for any funds from the Town for 
the construction of the playground. 

With the Town's permission, the playground will be 
constructed with volunteer labor between June 14 and June 18. 



151 



ELEMENTRY SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



Sally Bobbitt 

Edward Brogan, Hanscom Representative 
Wilson Hayes 
Wendy Kameny 
Michaela Lipsey 

John O'Malley, Hansom Representative 
Joan Walker, Chairperson 

This has been a year of significant change and new 
beginnings for the Lincoln Public Schools. A number of 
personnel changes have taken place both in administrative and 
teaching staff. Curriculum programs planned last year have been 
implemented in classrooms and a system-wide review of all 
curriculum areas has begun. New community projects have been 
initiated which will have important effects on the schools for 
years to come. Building projects to maintain the Lincoln campus 
schools and to renovate the Hanscom campus schools have been 
approved and begun this year. The school system has joined in a 
collaborative project with seven other towns to improve the 
academic performance of minority students. With Sudbury and 
with the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School, the school 
systems studied the issues related to a shared superintendency 
for the Sudbury schools and the regional high school. Through 
all of these activities, we have continued to work with 
administrators and staff to provide an educational experience 
that, through its diversity of offerings, its electives program, 
and its strong curriculum will help prepare our children for the 
wide variety of futures they will choose. 

PERSONNEL 

This year has been marked by a number of important 
personnel changes. In February, Dr. Elizabeth Twomey announced 
her resignation as Superintendent of Schools to accept an 
appointment as Associate Commissioner in the Massachusetts 
Department of Education. During her six years as 
superintendent, Dr. Twomey managed the consolidation of the 
school system in reaction to declining enrollment, the 
development of a budget process that earned community support 
and approval, the introduction of new curriculum programs, and 
the planning for the major renovation project for the Hanscom 
schools. It was with both a profound sense of loss and 
heartfelt good wishes for her new venture that the School 
Committee accepted Dr. Twomey' s resignation. 

In June, following a careful and deliberate search 
process, the Committee appointed Dr. Gregory M. Ciardi as 
Superintendent. Dr. Ciardi had served for eight years as the 
Director of Management Services for the Concord Public Schools 
and the Concord-Carlisle Regional School District. Before Dr. 
Ciardi' s arrival, Diane Nockles ably served as Acting 



152 



Superintendent and the Committee expresses its gratitude for her 
willingness to accept this responsibility. In September, the 
new superintendent proposed to the Committee a set of nine 
system-wide goals to guide the direction of the district for the 
year. These goals direct efforts in the areas of curriculum 
development, staff development, decision-making, budgeting, 
capital projects and relations with the community. 

Following funding approval at the Annual Town Meeting, the 
Committee authorized a search process to fill the new position 
of Director of Curriculum. In August, Dr. Karen Mazza was 
appointed. Dr. Mazza had served for four years as the Assistant 
Superintendent for Curriculum for the Silver Lake Regional 
School District and Superintendency Union #31 in Kingston, 
Massachusetts. In September, Dr. Mazza proposed a system-wide 
curriculum review process to assess the current state of all 
curriculum areas in the Lincoln schools. This process, which 
includes staff and community involvement, is currently underway, 
with its first report scheduled for March. 

During the 1987-1988 school year, Jane Benes served as 
Acting Principal of the Brooks School, following the resignation 
in June of 1987 of Russ Tornrose. Ms. Benes managed the ongoing 
operation of the school during the transition year in a way that 
not only maintained but improved the excellent programs of the 
school. The Committee extends its appreciation and gratitude to 
Ms. Benes for her willingness to serve as Principal of the 
Brooks School during this significant transition. In May, after 
a comprehensive search process, the Committee appointed Ms. Joan 
Donoghue to serve as Brooks Principal. Having served three 
years as Assistant Principal and three years as Principal of the 
Middle School West in Salem, and currently teaching courses in 
educational administration at Salem State College, Ms. Donoghue 
comes to us with outstanding qualifications. 

Significant changes have also occurred in the teaching 
staff. As a result of changes in student enrollments and other 
teacher career decisions, in December of 1988, 18 teachers out 
of a staff of 114 are in their first year in the Lincoln 
Schools. This significant change in staff represents an 
opportunity and a challenge for the school system to maintain 
its traditions of excellence while being receptive to the new 
and fresh ideas of our new colleagues. 

In December, Al Callahan, shop teacher in Lincoln for 
thirty years, was tragically killed in a accident at his home in 
Carlisle. The staff and students of the Brooks School mourned 
the loss of a good friend and a veteran teacher. The School 
Committee with a deep sense of regret and loss extend its 
sympathy to his wife and family. 




153 



CURRICULUM 



The quality of an educational program is dependent upon 
the excellence of its professional and administrative staff, the 
adequate provision of resources, and a commitment to high 
standards in curriculum and pedagogy. In the final analysis, it 
is the curriculum that is the heart of the program. Over the 
years, through the efforts of individual teachers and a variety 
of curriculum committees, we have maintained a superior 
instructional program. However, while individual excellence is 
the hallmark of true learning, a comprehensive program requires 
coherence and sequence toward this end, the Committee has 
appointed a Director of Curriculum to create the environment in 
which individual teacher curriculum efforts may be focused 
toward the comprehensive needs of the school as a whole. As a 
first step, the director has surveyed both staff and parents 
about current perceptions of the status of the school 
curriculum. A broad-based committee of teachers and parents is 
presently reviewing the survey results to identify those 
curriculum areas most likely to benefit from a formal 
system-wide curriculum development project. This committee 
report will direct curriculum efforts for the near future. 

In September, teachers began test piloting the new science 
curriculum, Science Curriculum Instructional Improvement Study 
(SCIIS), adopted last year. Working with a teaching consultant, 
teachers have begun to become familiar with the program* s 
concepts and materials and to experiment with them in the 
classroom. This test will give us information about how best to 
incorporate the SCIIS program into the Lincoln schools and will 
identify additional staff development activities needed for full 
implementation. 

BUILDING RENOVATIONS 

At the 1987 Annual Town Meeting, voters approved a warrant 
article to conduct much needed repairs to the heating systems 
and school roofs on the Lincoln campus. This summer, the 
projects to replace the aging roofs with a new single-ply 
membrane and to convert the heating system at Hartwell to a gas 
fired hot air system were completed. While these renovations 
will do much to protect our capital investment in our school 
buildings, it must be recognized that because the buildings 
currently owned by the Town most likely will be the only 
buildings available for the future, a comprehensive, ongoing 
program of building renovation and repair, supported by adequate 
and secure resources, represents not only sound fiscal 
management but also a responsibility to future generations of 
school children. 



154 



In September, the Hanscom Air Force Base received approval 
for a $4.5 million school renovation project to replace the 
outdated primary school, to add classroom space to replace aging 
"temporary" trailers, and to upgrade the middle school building 
systems. In May, ground was broken on this project. Completion 
is expected in June of 1990. 

METCO 

METCO (Metropolitan Council for Educational Opportunity) 
was founded over twenty years ago to provide educational 
opportunities in suburban schools for inner city children and to 
help address racial imbalances in those suburban schools. As 
one of 33 cooperating towns in the METCO program, about 90 
Boston children are bussed daily to Lincoln where they comprise 
approximately 20% of the student population. Last year, in 
response to concerns raised about keeping open lines of 
communication among all participants in the Lincoln METCO 
program, the Committee hired Dr. William McMullen to help the 
Committee identify and address specific communication problems. 
Dr. McMullen' s report, presented to the Committee in May, listed 
several areas of concern and made specific recommendations 
regarding how to enhance open communication/ 

Simultaneously, through the efforts of the Lincoln METCO 
Coordinator and an ad-hoc group of teachers and admins trators, 
Lincoln was investigating the possibility of joining other METCO 
districts in a collaborative effort to address the recently 
acknowledged gap in academic performance between resident 
students and inner city students which has been occurring in 
virtually all METCO communities. Upon his arrival, Dr. Ciardi 
proposed that the system accept the responsibility of addressing 
this gap in achievement formally as a system-wide goal for this 
year. The School Committee accepted this goal and the system 
subsequently has joined with seven other METCO districts to form 
the Eastern Massachusetts Initiative, a collaborative designed 
to address this issue by sharing information, training, 
programs, and administration. EMI is actively seeking non-tax 
funding to support this effort. Because this effort will 
include developing systems to communicate about student 
achievement among all of the people interested in the 
achievement of METCO students, recommendations about 
communication contained in the McMullen report will be 
incorporated into this more focused project. 

COMMUNITY 

This year, two important initiatives have been begun in 
the community which should have significant benefits for the 
schools. First, a citizen's group has formed the Lincoln 
Foundation, a non-profit funding agency devoted to raising and 
distributing monies for the support of projects in the schools 



155 



which cannot be supported with tax dollars but which nonetheless 
show promise for significantly enriching the educational 
experience of the students. Second, another citizen's group has 
formed the "Strats* Place" Committee to raise funds and to build 
a Robert Leathers playground near the Hartwell School. The 
entire community was involved in the design of the playground, 
which will be built by community volunteers in June. 

SHARED SUPERINTENDENCE 

Throughout the year, members of an ad-hoc committee have 
been working with representatives from Sudbury and from the 
Lincoln-Sudbury Regional School Committee to study the issues 
related to Sudbury and LSRHS sharing a superintendency and other 
administrative functions. With the help of a consulting firm, 
the Committee has also examined related changes in the 
governance structure of the two school districts. In December, 
the Lincoln School Committee agreed to support a change in 
structure to allow the five members of the Sudbury School 
Committee and two persons appointed by the Lincoln School 
Committee to form the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional School 
Committee. A warrant article requesting voter approval of the 
governance change will be presented to the Sudbury and Lincoln 
Town Meetings in the Spring. 

In closing, the School Committee would like to extend its 
appreciation and gratitude to the school staff, the parents, and 
the people of Lincoln for the deep commitment made over the 
years to high quality public education. We believe we have a 
school system in which we can all be proud. 



156 



LINCOLN PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
CLASS OF 1988 



Terrence K. Baker 
Yolanda Michelle Bonaparte 
L. Ryan Bowse 
Dan Z. Brodney 
Michelle Ann Bounopane 
Timothy Charles Burke 
Rahsaan A. Burroughs 
Sonya Rochelle Butler 
San K. Chau 
Barbara Jean Craddock 
Monica Liane Dean 
Andrea Elaine D'Elia 
Justine Francoise Delori 
James DeNormandie 
Moha Samir Desai 
Neil Armstrong Duane 
Nathaniel White Farney 
Zahra Farrokh Pars 
Lynn Catherine Fraser 
Aprel Suzanne Goddard 
Tamare Lynn Gordon 
Rachelle Stephanie Hecht 



Joel Higgins 
Andrew Douglas Hunter 
Patricia Kao 
Keisha Teshon Langford 
Andrew Barak Loewenstein 
Adrienne Aileen Marcus 
Jacqueline Eldora McNeill 
James E. McNeill, Jr. 
Nicholas David Meyer 
Santana A. Montgomery 
Daphne Paris Nicolaides 
Michael Andrew Onigman 
David J. Reinherz 
Melissa Noelle Ritchie 
Ethan C. Rossiter 
Michael J. Schubmehl 
Gregory A. Shaw 
Kevin M. Smith 
Jacob Samuel Stam 
Daniel Mark Stanzler 
Dale D. Wengler 
Kathryn Wilburn 



ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 



Gregory M. Ciardi 
Juliana Marchessault 
Karen Mazza 
Lois Taylor 
Robert Budds 
Carroll Blake 
Diane Nockles 
Joan Donoghue 
Sally Webber 
Ronald Hadge 



Superintendent of Schools 
Business Manager 
Director of Curriculum 
Director of Pupil Services 
Director of Plant Operations 
MET CO Coordinator 
Principal, Hartwell School 
Principal, Brooks School 
Principal, Hanscom Primary School 
Principal, Hanscom Middle School 



Hours: The Office of the Superintendent is open Monday through 
Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. 



157 



LINCOLN PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
ENROLLMENT AS OF OCTOBER 1, 1988 



SCHOOL 



Hartwell 



Brooks 



GRADE SECTIONS 


STUDENTS* 


K 


3 


57(12) 


1 


3 


69(13) 


2 


3 


64(12) 


3 


3 


58(10) 


4 


2 


48 ( 9) 


TOTAL: 


14 




5 


2 


43( 8) 


6 


2 


46 ( 9) 


7 


2 


41( 7) 


8 


2 


40 ( 9) 


TOTAL: 


8 





TOTALS 



LINCOLN CAMPUS TOTAL: 
*()=METCO students 



296(56) 



170(33) 
466(89) 



******* 



Hanscom Primary 



Hanscom Middle 



K 

Pre-1 
1 
2 
3 



TOTAL: 



TOTAL: 



5 
1 
5 
4 
J_ 
19 

3 
3 
3 
3 

_3_ 
15 



97 
13 
107 
83 
69 



62 
59 
59 
59 
57 



HANSCOM CAMPUS TOTAL: 

LINCOLN PUBLIC SCHOOLS TOTAL: 

CASE and Outside Placements - Lincoln: 12 

- Hanscom: 16 



369 



296 
665 
1,131 



158 



LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL DISTRICT SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



William C. Hewins 

Sarah Cannon Holden 

Geraldine C. Nogelo, Vice-Chairman 

David S. Pettit 

Phyllis Rappaport 

Richard F. Brooks, Chairman 

Your High School Committee had an exciting and busy 1988. 
Besides the stimulus of our young people and their activities, 
we have been hard at work on administration and "governance" of 
the school. 

The search for a new superintendent/principal, which was 
begun in 1987, came to naught. The two final candidates 
withdrew from the process. We set about starting over using a 
consultant this time. We selected NESDEC (New England School 
Development Council) to assist us. Before searching for a new 
superintendent /principal, the Committee voted to study the 
feasibility of sharing a superintendent with the Town of Sudbury 
School Department. (This had been done before.) NESDEC was 
retained to study the feasibility of such an arrangement. 

A committee of 19 people (Liaison Committee) was convened 
to interact with the consultants. Representatives of Lincoln, 
Sudbury and L-S High School, parents, staff, etc. served on this 
committee, chaired by Gerry Nogelo. 

After reviewing the study results, the Liaison Committee 
has recommended that we share a superintendent with Sudbury. 
The three school committees (Lincoln, Sudbury, and L-S) (called 
the "Tri-School Group") met several times starting in the 
spring. After reviewing the Liaison Committee report, the 
Tri-School Group met on November 17 and voted, on an advisory 
basis, to sponsor/support articles which, if passed by both town 
meetings, would change the governance of L-S so that the 
Regional Committee would be composed of members of the two local 
school committees or appointed by them. They also included, in 
this "vote", support for the position of a Sudbury/L-S shared 
superintendent . 

As a result, the town meetings in April will take up the 
matter of changing the representation on the L-S Committee. 

Lincoln-Sudbury West High School, an alternative school 
for 30-40 students, has occupied space in the Fairbank School on 
Fairbank Road for almost nine years. This fall we have 
participated with the Council on Aging, the Park and Recreation 
Commission and the permanent Building Committee in Sudbury to 
plan renovations to the Fairbank building. The work will take 
place next year, if Sudbury Town Meeting approves, and the 



159 



building will accommodate L-S West, Senior Citizens Drop-in 
Center and Park and Recreation programs, including the Teen 
Center as well as the new Atkinson Pool which was opened last 
year. 

L-S won the Dalton Trophy for our division in 
interscholastic athletics again this year. This is particularly 
gratifying as it is awarded for participation as well as results 
on the fields of athletics. This is the fourth Dalton Trophy 
for L-S. 

We constructed a new rubberized track surface this year 
and a citizens group is raising money to install lights over the 
track and football field. Area towns are having more and more 
night games and we are following suit. 

The space problems in the Town of Sudbury could be 
partially resolved by moving the Sudbury Schools administrative 
staff to space we now rent to the Carroll School. This is 
presently being discussed. 

We have about 1,145 students. Ninety-six are from Boston 
(METCO) with the other 1,020 being about 86% Sudbury and 14% 
Lincoln students. Lincoln's share of the student body has been 
declining and will probably continue to do so. The total number 
of students will continue to decline at L-S until the fall of 
1993. We would be down to about 850 students, including METCO, 
before the numbers start to increase again. The smallest 
classes are in the 4th grade. Lincoln-Sudbury graduated its 
first class in 1957 with 32 students. Our largest class was in 
1977 with about 500 students graduating. The class of 1989 has 
325 members. The class of 1995 is planned to be about 200. 

Keeping a quality program and a comprehensive program are 
difficult choices for school committees over the next few 
years. Necessary reductions in staff create morale problems 
which affect us all. 

The Committee voted not to extend "Max-Ed" privileges to 
sophomores in the future. Max-Ed cards are issued to students, 
with parental permission, allowing them to leave campus during 
the day when not in class. This privilege is extended to 
juniors and seniors now. 

Lynn Donaldson retired from the Committee last April after 
six years, and Neil Hickey retired after three years service. 

Brad Sargent retired as superintendent /principal after a 
total of 26 years of service to the school. 

At the 1988 "Springthing" event at L/S, we honored one of 
our graduates, Diana Golden, who honored us all at the 1988 
Calgary Winter Olympics by participating as a Special Olympian 



160 



and winning several gold medals. (Diana lost a leg to cancer 
when she was a young girl.) She presented several gold medals 
she won in World Competition to some former teachers at 
Lincoln-Sudbury . 



ANNUAL REGIONAL DISTRICT ELECTION 

The Regional District Election was held in conjunction 
with the elections in Lincoln and Sudbury on Monday, March 28, 
1988 and certifications of the results were received from Nancy 
J. Zuelke, Town Clerk of Lincoln, and Jean M. MacKenzie, Town 
Clerk of Sudbury, as follows: 





Lincoln 


Sudbury 


Total 


Catherine Briggs Hanafi 


90 


1,317 


1,407 


William C. Hewins 


412 


1,713 


2,125 


Sarah Cannon Holden 


641 


1,101 


1,742 


Blanks 


287 


2,127 


2,414 




1,430 


6,258 


7,688 



Maureen Hines 
District Clerk 



161 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 



Dr. Robert M. Gardner, Interim Superintendent/Principal 

Bradford Sargent completed his long service to 
Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School in June 1988. While the 
Towns and School Committees are studying the possibility of 
combining the two districts, Sudbury K-8 and Lincoln-Sudbury 
Regional High School 9-12 under a shared Superintendent, the 
school is being administered by Interim 
Superintendent/Principal, Dr. Robert M. Gardner. 

The school opened in September with enrollment still 
declining at 1,112 students including the L-S West Alternative 
High School students. Special Education students bring the 
total enrollment figure for grades 9-12 to 1,134. Current 
projections indicate that the enrollment will continue to drop 
to the 652-900 range in a few years before beginning to increase. 

The Student Government, faculty and parent organization 
are involved in the affairs of the school and working well in 
the best interests of the school. I am impressed with the 
dedication of the staff and the high quality of the programs at 
Lincoln-Sudbury compared to other school systems in the 
Northeast and across the nation. The Student Senate this year 
is a particularly responsible group and are responsive to issues 
in the life of the school. The communities should take pride in 
their efforts. 



162 



LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL 



GRADUATES—CLASS OF 1988 



Kimberly Alyssa Aaronson 
Elizabeth Sullivan Abrams 
Gulcin Beki Afres 
Kimberly Albee 
Sean D. Alexander 
David Michael Allen 
Krista Marie Allenberg 
William Park Andrews 
Nancy Susan Anton 
Laurie Jane Armstrong 
Karen Louise Arpino 
Christopher North Atwood 

Brent Andrew Babbitt 

Ralph Able Babcock III 

Glen Lee Bacus 
*Carolyn Elizabeth Bagley 

Gwendolyn Mead Baker 

Deidre Mary Bannon 

David A. Barker 

Domenic J. Belsito, Jr. 
*Silvia Cristina Bendana 

Craig Peter Berkel 

Elizabeth Ann Berry 

David Benjamin Blacker 

Marci Sarah Blacker 

Steven J. Bohac 

John P. Bohne 

Eric K. Bolton 

Evelyn Mary Bonn 

Karl Andrew Borg 

Michele Janine Bowden 

Gabrielle Dominique Bowdoin 

Marcus Willie Boyd 

Molly Bradley 

Jessica Lynn Brenner 

Deanna Bridges 

Sara Beth Brinen 
*Alison Louise Bryant 

Christopher James Buckley 

Michael J. Buckley 

William L. Burroughs 

Heather Mary Byrne 

Lauren Anne Byrne 

Michelle Nicole Byrne 



Tommie M. Campbell 
*Robert Carey 

Michael Sean Carney 

Chantal Maria Casey 

Jacquelyn Ann Cefola 

Orlando E. Chambers, Jr. 

Rodney Marc Chance 

Rebecca Mary Christine Claxton 

Stephanie Paige Cohen 

Stefan Coleman 

Ronnie Cooper 

Samantha Lynn Costello 

Kimberly Ann Coughlin 
*Kimberly Lynn Couranz 

Olegario Lopez Craig 

Russell Croel 

Joseph Edward Cronin 

Kris Susan Curran 
*Beth Anne Cutting 

John Michael Czimbal 

Christopher James Dangel 
Colin Kline Dangel 
Amy Lynn Darsch 
Andrew J. Davis 
Jonathan Davis 
Laurie Fair Davis 
Scott C. Davis 
Robert DeFranco 
Laura Madeleine DeNormandie 
Courtney Therese Sarah DePeter 
Victor DelRegno 
William Devaney 
Michael Joseph Devine 
Gina Marie DiCarlo 
*John Joseph Donlon, Jr. 
Sean Colin Donovan 
Pamela Marie Dorsey 
Kristen R. Dow 
Claudia Ann Dragun 
Christpoher Robert Dreher 
Robin Drouin 
David Eldridge DuPuy 
Christina Robbins Duborg 
Heather Margaret Duckett 
Patricia Marie Duncan 
Deric Wess Dunn 



163 



Cary Anthony Elliott 
*Heather Lee Ellsworth 

Suzannah Lang Farny 

Cristina Ellen Favaloro 

Charlotte Finigan 

Emily Caroline Fisher 

Arthur Fitzhugh II 

Jennifer Amy Floyd 

Andrea Josephine Fonte 

Diana Lynn Forte 
*Kevin Scott Foster 

Thomas Dennis Fowler 
*Samantha Lynn Fox 

David Lawrence Fredman 

Pamela Hope Friedman 
*Kara Marie Frigon 

Robin Michelle Fuller 

Jill B. Furman 

Susanne Marie Gainer 

Elizaberh Anne Gallagher 

Julian John Gallitano 

Nader M. Gheith 

Michael D. Glasgow 

Steven I. Goldsmith 

Faye Gordon 

Joseph Andrew Gorgone 

Brooke E. Grace 

Carloyn Margaret Gracey 

Melony Coleen Antionette Graham 

Derek Grant 

Geoffrey David Grant 

Sean Gray 

Kenneth F. Grierson 
Sonia Marie Groves 
Sarah Veronica Guernsey 

Chris A. Hales 
Nicole F. Halverson 
Allison Greta Hammer 
Richard Scott Hammond 
Sarah C. Harding 
Harry Haroutunian 
Eric S. Hartstone 
James Michael Hatch 
Jeffrey D. Hatch 
Derek Richard Hayden 
Andrea L. Heiser 
*Robert Curtis Hendrickson 
Philip Hillman 
Katherine Hoben 
Paul Glynn Hogan 



Norvalett Holman 
Ronald Clark Horton, Jr. 
Christian W. Howard 
Chrisa Leigh Hunnewell 
Liza Hunter 

Alisa Mishelle Isenberg 
Kenton X. Jacobs 
Jonathan Jewett 
Hyacinthe Joassainte 
Karin Kristina Johansson 
Raquel Mariela Jose 
Jehangir F. Jungalwala 

Ian Christopher Kabat 
Derek John Kalchbrenner 
Cindy J. Karloff 
Gaile Natalija Karsas 
Ann Catherine Kenda 
Emma Sarah Ketteringham 
Daniel Scott King 
Celestine Adrienne Klein 
Kathryn Ann Kronenberger 
*Noa Rachael Kushner 

*Melinda Hale Lamont -Havers 

Nicole Lamoureaux 

Margaret Helen Langlitz 

Lisa Langmuir 

Eric James Latimer 

Erin LeBlond 

Ross Benedict Leav 

Lorna Marisa Leo 

Lang Elliot Leonard 

Stacey Robyn Levine 

Douglas Lewis III 

Carlos Roberto Licona 
*Stephanie Jean Lind 

Anne K. Linden 

Trevor Christian Little 

Juan Pablo Xavier Lopez 

Daniel Corbit Lovering 

Gregg Frederick Luconi 

Carolyn Jane Mack 

Ian Batchelder MacLean 
*Melanie Ann MacLeod 

Stacy Anne Mahoney 

Jeremy Mandell 
*Lisa Claflin Mansfield 

Paul Richard Marobella, Jr. 

E. Robert Marriott 

Jeffrey Marshall 



164 



James Martindale 
Thomas Maus 

Christopher Allen Mawn 
Bridey Bliss Maxwell 
Gregory Robert May 
Patricia Jean McCall 
Robert McClain 
William McClain 
Denise McDonald 
Lisa Ann McHugh 
Suzanne M. McKay 
Karan Anne McLean 
Andrew McMorrow 
*Susan M. Melnick 
Christopher Douglas Meltzer 
Rachel Anne Miller 
Diane M. Molina 
Kerry Jeanne Monaghan 
Victoria Claire Moncrieff 
#*Cecily Anne Morgan 
Sue Elaine Moroney 
Kendra Beatrice Morris 
Catherine Elizabeth Moss 
Christopher W. Mullen 
Holly Elizabeth Mullen 
Michael Murdock 
Jennifer Ann Murphy 
Ethan Levi Mutschler 



Edward Michael Potter 
*Amy Beth Powell 

Amy Rebecca Price 

Daina Anna Priede 

Robert Hill Puffer 

Robert Edmund Pyne 

Michele Lynn Racicot 
*Rita Meena Raju 

William Louis Jeffrey Charles Ramon 

Bruce Rankin 

Sarah Elizabeth Rawlins 

David Redfield 

Jennifer Shawn Reed 

Stacey Allison Reinherz 
* Andrew Re i sing 

Christopher Remington 

Nicole Jeanne Rice 

Patricia Morrene Risley 

Nicole Ann Ritchie 

Elliot C. Robey 

Eric L. Robinson 

Walter B. Robinson 

Lonnie Rodgers II 

Cheri Dionne Roebuck 

Billie Jane Rome 
*Anthony Joseph Rossini 

Nancy Irene Rubin 
* David James Ryan 



*Jyothi Lakshmi Nambiar 
Laura Faye Nathanson 
#*Fred H. Nemeth 
Sharon Lynn Noble 

Catherine Marie O'Brien 
Christpoher John Oldham 

Wallace R. Palmer III 

Ganesh Pandit 

Michelle Beth Paster 

Mark Reid Patti 
#*Jeffrey Peppercorn 

James C. Perry 

Joshua S. Peters 
*Laura Christine Petrovic 
//Kristen Pettit 

Chris John Piallat 

Paul Eugene Pi/xza 

Eben R. Pickells 

Raphael Pittman 

Sarah Pitts 

Brenda Lynn Poor 



*Karen Lee Salvini 
Dawn Elizabeth Sasiela 
David A. Saxe 
Brian Edward Schirf 
Steven Daniel Schwalje 
Katherine Frances Sheenan 
Todd Matthew Short 
Karl Jonus Shuman 
Melody Nichole Sinders 
Jennifer Almaz Skaff 
Jennifer Annemarie Skulte 
Charles M. Slate 
Eric Stephen Smith 
Jabreel Smith 

*Kevin Patrick Smith 

*Julie Anne Sonjara 
Ellen Beth Sooper 
Darby-Sue Spiller 

*Henry Carlton Spindler 
James Eugene Spurgin 
Scott A. Stacey 

*Tanya Sheree Steinberg 
M. Aaron Stern 



165 



Paul Stitt 

David Robert Sullivan 
Andrew John Surwilo 
Craig L. Sussman 
*William Gary Sussman 
Suzanne Marie Sweeney 
Paul Arthur Sweet 
Aaron Lamont Tavares 



*Michele Maria Zarella 
Susan Anne Zilvitis 
Kristin Elizabeth Zirkel 



*Cum Laude 
//Honors in History 



Janeen Maria Tevekelian 
Wendy Theiler 

Gabrielle Alexis Tiep-Daniels 

Richard W. Tingey 

Lee Maryon Tingley 

Alison Leslie Tomlin 
*Cathy Chun-tze Tong 
*Denny S. Tong 

Kim Elizabeth Troisi 

Paul F. Ullmann 
Alex M. Underwood 

Jennifer Valentine 
Jeffrey Steven Venter 
Jon William Verhey 
Francesca Anna Verri 
*Scott Victor Vifquain 

Jeffrey Mark Walker 
Lori Beth Walker 
Gregory Stuart Wallack 
Jennifer Mary Felishia Walsh 
Derek A. Ward 
Joseph M. Ward 
Lisa Michelle Weiner 
Richard Marc Weiner 
Susan Dianne Whipkey 
Hilary White 
Matthew Caraco Whiteley 
Jason R. Wilburn 
Stephen Robert Wilkinson 
James Otis Williams 
Kara Jean Williamson 
Charlene Wilson 
*Daniel Aaron Wilson 
Nicole Genienne Wilson 
David Lawrence Wiseman 
Martha Llewellyn Wofford 
Richard G. Wolfe III 
Elizabeth V. Wuehrmann 



166 



DISTRIBUTION OF PUPILS ATTENDING REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL 
AS OF OCTOBER 1, 1988 





1984 


1985 


1986 


1987 


1988 


Lincoln 


186 


175 


172 


153 


123 


Sudbury 


1,021 


1,042 


978 


961 


887 


MET CO 

(Tuition) 


97 


91 


97 


92 


92 


Other 


8 


10 


13 


14 


10 


TOTAL 


1,312 


1,318 


1,260 


1,220 


1,112 


Boys 


666 


670 


618 


601 


557 


Girls 


646 


648 


642 


619 


555 


TOTAL 


1,312 


1,318 


1,260 


1,220 


17TT2 


Qfh Grade* 


320 


340 


256 


264 


263 


10th Grade 


315 


337 


338 


258 


262 


11th Grade 


333 


317 


332 


348 


253 


12th Grade 


339 


314 


321 


336 


324 


Other 


5 


10 


13 


14 


10 


TOTAL 


1,312 


1,318 


1,260 


1,220 


1,112 


Tuition Pupils 

Attending 

Other Schools 33 


35 


25 


20 


25 



167 



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168 



LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 
Treasurer's Report 
July 1, 1987 thru June 30, 1988 

Marcia A. Roehr, Treasurer 

Total Cash Balance, July 1, 1987 $ 792,962.69 



District Fund 



Cash Balance, July 1, 1987 
Receipts : 

Operating Accounts 
Sudbury Assessment 
Lincoln Assessment 

Total Assessments 
Chapter 70 
Chapter 71 
Transportation 
School Construction Aid 

Total State Aid 
Bond Anticipation Notes 

Total BAN Income 
Chapter 188 

Total State Chapter 188 
School Building Rental 27,700.00 

Total Other Income 
Miscellaneous Income 
Petty Cash Refund 
Tailings 

Total Sundry Income 

Total Operating Receipts 

Deduction Accounts 

Federal Withholding Tax $ 843,671.29 

Massachusetts Withholding Tax 253,422.92 

Federal Withholding Tax FICA 14,828.93 

Health Insurance 91,146.12 

Mass. Teachers' Retirement 241,561.18 

Middlesex County Retirement 73,394.90 

Disability Insurance #1 25,517.97 

Tax Sheltered Annuities 223,556.65 

Credit Union 326,260.15 



482,784.09 



$ 5,412,354.09 
922,601.96 

707,774.00 
470,440.00 
202,385.00 
52,310.15 

1,500,000.00 

46,575.00 



189,958.50 
1,000.00 
708.61 



6,334,956.05 

1,432,909.15 
1,500,000.00 
46,575.00 
27,700.00 

191,667.11 
$ 9,533,807.31 



169 



L-S Teachers' Association 23,830.00 
Attachments 2,599.92 
United Way 1897.00 

Heys Memorial Fund 192.00 

Total Deduction Receipts 2,121,879.03 
Total District Fund Receipts $ 11,655,686.34 



TOTAL DISTRICT FUND INCOME $ 12,138,470.43 



Disbursements ; 

Operating Accounts 

Operating Budget $ 7,477,152.63 

Capital Projects 50,000.00 

Equipment 295,476.26 

Debt Service - principal 60,000.00 

- interest 6,975.00 

Total Budget Disbursements $ 7,889,603.89 

Bond Anticipation Notes 1,500,000.00 

Total BAN Disbursements 1,500,000.00 

Prof essionaal Development Grant 17,237.00 
Horace Mann Grant 10,500.00 
School Improvement Council 18,838.00 

Total Chapter 188 Disbursements 46,575.00 

Petty Cash Advance 1,000.00 
Tailings 522.61 

Surplus Revenue 1,388.68 

Total Sundry Disbursements 2,911.29 

Total Operating Disbursements $ 9,439,090.18 

Deduction Accounts 

Federal Withholding Tax $ 843,671.29 

Mass. Withholding Tax 253,422.92 

Federal Withholding Tax FICA 14,828.93 

Health Insurance 86,490.74 

Mass. Teachers' Retirement 241,561.18 

Middlesex County Retirement 73,394.90 

Disability Insurance #1 24,613.42 

Tax Sheltered Annuities 221,087.97 

Credit Union 326,260.15 

L-S Teachers' Association 23,830.00 

Attachments 2599.92 

United Way 1,841.00 

Heys Memorial Fund 272.00 

Total Deduction Disbursements 2,113,874.42 

TOTAL DISTRICT FUND DISBURSEMENTS $ 11,552,964.60 



170 



Cash Balance, District Fund, June 30, 1988 $ 585,505.83 

Revolving Accounts Sub-Total 138,165.80 

Scholarship Fund 202,496.67 

Bond - State of Israel $ 422.50 

$ 341,084.97 

Cash Balance, District Fund, June 30, 1988 585,505.83 

Cash Balance, Revolving Accounts, June 30, 1988 341,084.97 

TOTAL CASH BALANCE, June 30, 1988 $ 926,590.80 



Scholarship Fund 
June 30, 1988 



Cash Balance, July 1, 1987 
Receipts - principal 

- interest 

- Springthing 
Disbursements - operating 

- awards 



$ 195,930.13 
7,788.00 
13,065.06 
5,036.00 
(1,322.52 
(18,000.00 ) 



Cash Balance, June 30, 1988 $ 202,496.67 



171 



LINCOLN SUDBURY REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 



Balance Sheet 
June 30, 1988 

ASSETS 

Bank of Boston $ (185,423.97) 

Bank of Boston Money Market 892,811.82 

Baybank Middlesex Money Market 16,283.78 

Cooperative Bank of Concord 202,496.67 

Bond - State of Israel 422.50 

TOTAL ASSETS $ 926,590.80 



LIABILITIES AND RESERVES 



Tailings 


$ 186.00 


Surplus Revenue 


530,395.46 


Roof Repair Project 


5,542.00 


Health Insurance 


19,012.50 


Disability Insurance #1 


5,940.91 


Tax Sheltered Annuities 


29,694.96 


United Way 


276.00 


Outside Improvements 


41,460.00 


Building Renovation Project 


125.00 


Capital Outlay 


10,431.81 


Urban Child Conference FY88 


1,800.00 


Block Grant FY88 


4,731.00 


Educational Technology Grant 


( 1,999.00) 


Title II FY88 


1,407.68 


P.L. 94-142 


( 11,314.53) 


Computer Contract 


64,741.70 


UNUM 


1,372.68 


Metco FY88 


797.37 


Cafeteria 


( 328.32) 


Nursery School 


7,496.82 


Athletic Fund 


3,500.00 


Adult Education 


5,638.19 


Library Copy Machine 


2,763.05 


Scholarship Fund 


202,496.67 


Bond - State of Israel 


422.50 



TOTAL LIABILITIES $ 926,590.80 



OUTSTANDING DEBT 
State House Notes, $ 60,000 payable 

Aug. 15, 1988 60,000.00 

BAN payable September 1, 1988 750,000.00 

TOTAL DEBT $ 810,000.00 



172 



LINCOLN SCHOLARSHIP COMMITTEE 



Sherry Adams 
Andrew F. Hall, III 
Mary Wiley 

The Lincoln Scholarship Committee is working with more and 
more Lincoln high school students in need of financial aid. 
During this past fiscal year, we met with and awarded a total of 
$11,600 in scholarships to seven individuals. These awards were 
based upon our interviewing each student, discussing with them 
their needs and the resources that might be available to them 
during their first year in college. 

In most cases, we could not completely close the gap 
between the student's resources and the anticipated expenses. 
We did, in part, help each of them close the gap between their 
present resources and their total estimated costs of attending 
college during their Freshman year. Each of these individuals 
was most appreciative of the help provided by the Lincoln 
Scholarship program and felt indebted to the Town and all of 
those that contribute to the annual appeal. 

The Annual Spring Appeal this year raised a total of 
$6,830. The reconciliation of accounts reflects $2,820 and the 
remaining $4,010 was deposited with the Town in July 1988. This 
amount will appear in next year's reconciliation. Subsequent to 
the end of the fiscal year, we received the bequest of $10,000 
from the Estate of Harlan B. Newton. As in the past, the 
financial report will identify this gift through separate line 
item presentation. 

The needs placed upon the Lincoln Scholarship Fund by 
deserving students has never been greater. During this past 
year while meeting with students, we came to the realization 
that college expenses are escalating at a rate that far exceeds 
the student's ability to accumulate funds. We feel that gifts 
to the Fund will be an important part of the future ability to 
help the ever increasing number of Lincoln graduating high 
school students. 

On behalf of the Committee, we thank all of those who have 
helped the Scholarship Fund reach the milestone of $100,000 in 
the Fund. 



173 



LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL SCHOLARSHIP FUND COMMITTEE 



Dorothy and David Bagley 
Regina and Ralph Cuomo 
Maureen and John Dolan 
Carol and Stephen Fisch 
William Hewins, LSRHS Committee 
Virginia Kirshner, LSRHS Faculty 
Claire and Pat Mullen 
Rosalind Spiller, LSRHS Faculty 



The Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School Scholarship 
Fund, through the generous contributions of the citizens and 
business organizations of Lincoln and Sudbury, and the staff of 
Lincoln-Sudbury High School has achieved an endowment of 
approximately $190,000. This has been made possible through our 
annual _f all mail campaign; the income from Springthing, 
traditionally held the second Saturday in May; and by memorial 
contributions by individuals, families and groups. The success 
of Springthing is directly attributable to that large group of 
friends who so generously donate their time and talents. The 
Scholarship Fund Committee raises and administers the 
endowment. A Faculty Committee chooses the recipients based on 
criteria established by the Fund Committee. 

The Fund is available to any graduate of Lincoln-Sudbury 
with definite career plans and financial need. In June 1988 a 
total of $18,000 was awarded to these outstanding students to 
whom the communities of Lincoln and Sudbury and the Scholarship 
Committee wish every success. 



The recipients of the 1988 awards were: 



Scholarship Fund Awards 



Carolyn Bagley 
Marcus Boyd 
Jacquelyn Cefola 
Samantha Costello 
Jonathan Davis 
Andrea Fonte 
Elizabeth Gallagher 



Stacy Mahoney 
Paul Marobella 
Christopher Mawn 
Christopher Mullen 
Jyothi Nambiar 
Darby-Sue Spiller 



Memorial Awards: 



Kirshner Scholarship: 
Wirzburger Scholarship: 
Arnold Scholarship: 
Hayes Scholarship: 
Sudbury Foundation Schola 

For information about the 
Scholarship Fund, call the High 



Gabrielle Bowdoin 
Jeffrey Venter 
Henry Spindler 
Rita Raju 
ship: Paul Hogan 

Lincoln-Sudbury High School 
chool at 259-9527. 



174 



MINUTEMAN REGIONAL VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 



Term 
Expires 



Acton 
Arlington 



Lancaster 
Lexington 



Sudbury 
Wayland 
Weston 



Lincoln 
Needham 
Stow 



Boxborough 



Carlisle 

Concord 

Dover 



Belmont 
Bolton 



John W. Putnam 

John P. Donahue, Chairman 

Linda Frizzell, Vice Chairman 

Peter Stalker 

Kenneth Whitcomb 

William Churchill 

Cynthia Griffis 

Robert B. Warner 

Fred A. Reed 

Nyles N. Barnert 

Harold A. Levey, Jr. 

Tim Sullivan 

Mary E. Cutler 

Lawrence Ovian 

Elaine Sweeney, Secretary 

John M. Tucker 



1991 
1991 
1989 
1990 
1991 
1991 
1989 
1990 
1991 
1990 
1989 
1989 
1990 
1989 
1990 
1990 



In 1988 the National Science Foundation selected Minuteman 
Tech teacher George Taliadouros as the top Science teacher in 
Massachusetts. In October, he traveled to Washington, D.C. 
where he was presented with a Presidential Award for Excellence 
in Science and Mathematics Teaching by President Reagan's 
Science Advisor. For the past 5 years, the Minuteman Tech 
science and mathematics teacher has been giving workshops to 
teachers and administrators throughout New England on the 
Principles of Technology curriculum (applied physics and 
mathematics) and the Statistical Process Control curriculum for 
vocational technical high school students. Taliadouros is the 
co-author of both curricula. 

He also helped design and write Minuteman Tech's 
Electro-Mechanical/Robotics curriculum which will be used in 
other schools throughout Massachusetts and he is involved in 
other competency based vocational education (CBVE) development 
projects for the state of Massachusetts. In addition, he served 
on the design team for the Applied Mathematics curriculum 
developed by the Center of Occupational Research and Development 
in Waco, Texas. This curriculum will be used in the U.S., 
Canada and overseas. 

Minuteman Tech's Science and Technology Division in which 
Taliadouros is a staff member is involved in many innovative 
projects. The latest of these is the installation of a new 
learning laboratory called Technology Lab 2000 where students 
work at computerized stations which enable them to apply 
principles of science and technology to such areas as robotics, 
materials testing and fabrication, structures, computer aided 



175 



design and computer aided manufacturing. The lab utilizes 
computers to help students learn to work out technological 
problems and make choices and decisions while gaining insights 
into the social and environmental impacts of technology. 

Two Division students, juniors Matt Kahn of Watertown and 
Biaggio Occhino of Belmont, took one of the school's robots to 
Detroit, Michigan in June and programmed it to win first place 
in two competitions at the Robotics and Machine Vision Contest, 
sponsored by the Society of Manufacturing Engineers. Both 
students are enrolled in Minuteman 's Prep Tech program which 
provides a rigorous college preparatory curriculum for 
academically talented, technically oriented students who plan to 
attend a competitive technical college or institute. They plan 
to study engineering after graduating from Minuteman. 

During 1988 a number of other Minuteman Tech students also 
received awards for excellence in their career fields: 

* A two-person team of Forestry students won top honors in 
the overall Forestry Division at the Massachusetts State Future 
Farmers of America competition in Chicopee. Team members were 
Scott Goodman of Needham and Chris Burke of Lancaster. 
Horticulture Junior Mary Domenichella of Lincoln won second 
place in the General Knowledge exam. 

* Competing against 40 professional landscaping companies, 
Minuteman Tech Horticulture students constructed an exhibit that 
won the silver second prize medal in the Hardy Garden Division 
at the New England Flower Show. The students' work also bested 
exhibits by four colleges and an agricultural school to win the 
Roger Dane Trophy "for students in horticulture whose exhibit 
shows outstanding dedication, creativity and knowledge." 

* In the national Distributive Education Clubs of America 
(DECA) competition in Salt Lake City, Minuteman Tech Retailing 
sophmore Amy Balmforth of Carlisle won third place for her Civic 
Consciousness Project, "Breakfast with Santa". Senior 
Bobbie- Jean Tourville of Stow was one of nine finalists from the 
98 Massachusetts students in the national competition. Junior 
Christopher Keene of Stow is serving as a state DECA officer for 
the second year. 

* In the state Vocational Industrial Clubs of America 
(VICA) competition, senior Matthew LeDuc of Stow won the gold 
medal in Culinary Arts, post-graduate Christine Melone of 
Lexington won the gold medal in the Prepared Speech competition 
for the second year in a row, junior Edward Porreca of Belmont 
won the silver medal in Electrical Wiring and junior Monica 
Parker of Lexington won the silver medal in Commercial Art. 
Electrical wiring junior Beth MacAuley of Acton was elected a 
state VICA officer. 



176 



* Culinary Arts senior Jennifer McGurl of Arlington was 
named the Outstanding Vocational Technical student at Minuteman 
Tech and was honored by the state Department of Education at a 
banquet during National Vocational Education week. 

* Drafting junior Laura Frizzell of Belmont was selected 
to attend the American Legion Auxiliary's Girl's State Program. 

* The Minuteman Tech varsity Hockey Team made it to the 
state finals for the fifth year in a row. Senior Fernando 
Fernandes of Somerville became the first Minuteman wrestler to 
participate in the All State Tournament. 

There were other notable achievements by Minuteman Tech 
faculty and students during 1988: 

* Drafting Department students and staff completed a 
drawing of Lexington Center in a scale of one inch=50 feet. The 
ink on mylar drawing will be used by the Lexington Engineering 
Department. Minuteman 's Drafting teachers provided computer 
aided drafting (CAD) training to employees from Polaroid, 
Honeywell, MIT Lincoln Lab, ITEK and Raytheon. 

* Minuteman Athletic Director Walter Sargent became the 
first Massachusetts Athletic Director to receive the 
Distinguished Service Award from the National Interscholastic 
Athletic Administrators. He also received the Award of Merit 
from the Massachusetts Athletic Directors. 

* Minuteman Tech's partnership with Newton Wellseley 
Hospital was named a Notable Partnership of Industry and 
Education by the Massachusetts Department of Education's Office 
of Community Education. 

* Carpentry, Cabinetmaking , Plumbing, Electrical, Painting 
and Wallpapering, Heating/Vent ilation/Air Conditioning and 
Horticulture students are completing construction of a 
superinsulated house on Minuteman property at 10 Mill Street in 
Lincoln. Foundation work for a second Mill Street house is 
underway. The current plan is that both houses will be rented 
by the Town of Lincoln Housing Authority with revenues being 
turned over to Minuteman to defray construction expenses. 

* Cabinetmaking students finished constructing the large 
horse-shoe-shaped counter unit for the Stow Police Station. 
Carpentry students re-framed and re-shingled the roof of 
Lincoln's Sandy Pond Pumping Station and also put a small 
addition on the building. 

In the fall of 1988 Minuteman Tech established its FLEX 
Program to serve adult men and women (over 18). The program 
includes an Adult High School which enables adults to earn a 
high school diploma through group and individualized 



177 



instruction, independent study and test-out options. It also 
provides daytime and evening job training as well as career 
counseling and career information to adults. Many FLEX services 
are free to residents of Minuteman Tech district towns. 

Minuteman Tech is accredited by the New England 
Association of Schools and Colleges which requires that all of 
its member schools be evaluated by a visiting team of educators 
every ten years in order to maintain their accreditation. 
During the fall of 1988, a team of 28 educators from 
Massachusetts, Connecticut and Rhode Island observed the 
operation of Minuteman Tech and met with faculty, 
administration, parents and students to carry out this 
evaluation. 

During 1988 Concord member of the Minuteman Tech School 
Committee Cynthia Griff is resigned. Lawrence D. Lorah was 
appointed to take her place. 



178 



MINUTEMAN TECH - CLASS OF 1988 



There were no members of the graduating Class of 1988 who were 
from Lincoln. 



ENROLLMENT OCTOBER 1, 1988 



Town 


Grade 9 


Grade 10 


Grade 11 


Grade 12 


Graduate 


Total 


Acton 


7 


9 


12 


15 


7 


50 


Arlington 


49 


39 


37 


38 


32 


195 


Belmont 


11 


14 


10 


7 


11 


53 


Bolton 


1 


4 


3 


5 





13 


Boxborough 


2 


3 


5 


3 


1 


14 


Carlisle 








1 


1 


2 


4 


Concord 


6 


5 


7 


10 


6 


34 


Dover 


1 





3 


2 





6 


Lancaster 


9 


9 


9 


16 


1 


44 


Lexington 


6 


12 


10 


10 


7 


45 


Lincoln 


1 


1 


1 


3 


1 


7 


Needham 


5 


16 


13 


6 


5 


45 


Stow 


10 


13 


14 


10 


3 


50 


Sudbury 


13 


10 


14 


9 


4 


50 


Wayland 


3 


6 


8 


4 


4 


25 


Weston 





1 


1 


2 


2 


6 


Tuition 


26 


51 


42 


50 


16 


185 


TOTAL 


150 


193 


190 


191 


102 


826 



179 



MINUTEMAN REGIONAL VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL SCHOOL 



Assessed Apportionments for operating and capital costs for 7/1/88 
to 6/30/89 based on the number of students from each member town 
attending Minuteman on 10/1/87 as a percentage of the total number 
of students, per section V (c) of agreement. Apportionments for 
special operating costs based on section IV (f) of agreement. 

SPECIAL APPORTION- 



TOWN 


PER CENT 


OPERATING 


+ 


CAPITAL + 


OPERATING 


= MENT 


Acton 


7.507 


$ 389,901 


- 


52 


+ 


1,359 


= 


$ 391,209 


Arlington 


31.586 


1,640,528 


— 


219 


+ 


3,860 


= 


1,644,170 


Belmont 


7.932 


411,971 


- 


55 


+ 


761 


= 


412,677 


Bolton 


2.124 


110,349 


+ 


7,129* 


+ 


381 


= 


117,859 


Boxborough 


2.691 


139,776 


— 


18 


+ 


435 




140,192 


Carlisle 


.566 


29,427 


+ 


71 


+ 


54 


= 


29,552 


Concord 


5.240 


272,195 




36 


+ 


1,087 




273,246 


Dover 


.708 


36,783 


+ 


2,376* 


+ 


109 




39,268 


Lancaster 


6.232 


323,692 


+ 


20,911* 


+ 


1,686 




346,288 


Lexington 


7.648 


397,258 




53 


+ 


2,610 




399,815 


Lincoln 


.849 


44,140 




6 


+ 


326 




44,460 


Needham 


6.940 


360,475 


+ 


23,287* 


+ 


2,121 




385,882 


Stow 


6.515 


338,405 




45 


+ 


1,142 




339,502 


Sudbury 


8.640 


448,754 




60 


+ 


652 




449,347 


Wayland 


4.107 


213,342 




28 


+ 


707 




214,021 


Weston 


.708 


36,783 




5 


+ 


489 




37,268 


TOTALS 


100.000% 


5,193,780 


+ 


53,195 


+ $17,780 




$5,264,755 



*Includes a $400 per pupil surcharge (MINIMUM 5 PUPILS) for 10 
years to compensate 12 original member towns for debt service. 



STATE AID RECEIVED AND ANTICIPATED BETWEEN JULY 1, 1987 and 
JUNE 30, 1988 



CATEGORY 

Transportation, Chapter 71, 16c $ 730,397 

Chapter 70 (includes Special Ed.) 1,638,748 
Regional Aid, Chapter 71, 16d 402,169 
Construction Grant, Chapter 645 107,817 

$2,879,131 

NOTE: State aid and District revenue are used to reduce 
assessed apportionments of costs to member towns. 



180 



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183 



VITAL STATISTICS 



49 Births, 28 marriages and 26 deaths have been recorded 
during the year 1988 as follows: 

BIRTHS 



Date of 
Birth 

1987 

Feb. 9 

Nov. 5 

Nov. 25 

Nov. 27 

Dec. 1 

Dec. 11 

Dec. 15 

Dec. 20 

Dec. 28 
Dec. 28 



Name of Child 



Names of Parents 



Vasken Basmajian, Jr. 
Alexander Nielsen Atkins 
Catherine Straka Ingard 
Michael Jesse Ullman 
George Drabing Hicks 
Geoffrey Alexander Smith 



Vasken & Shoghig Basmajian 
John & Jamie Atkins 
Sven & Susan Ingard 
Steven & Amy Ullman 
Robert & Sarah Hicks 
John Smith, Jr. & Mary 
Menino 

Kate Morgan Pennington- Johnson Rollin Johnson & Hilary 

Pennington Johnson 

Eric Morten Gustavson Glenn Gustavson & 

Patricia Morten 

Matthew Burke Rice John & Nathalie Rice 

Julia Elizabeth Barnicle Michael Barnicle & Ann 

Finucane-Barnicle 



1988 



Jan. 5 Kate Way land Donaldson 

Jan. 7 Charles Kendall Wolff 

Jan. 7 Nathan Nash Banks 

Feb. 3 Julia Elizabeth Feldberg 

Feb. 7 Emily Susan Woodbury 

Feb. 9 Daniel Mintz 

Feb. 17 Eric Charles Dessain 

Feb. 26 Brittany Burlingham Hurd 

Feb. 27 Annelise Boussard Wiersema 

Mar. 7 Kenneth Louis Aronson 

Mar. 16 Simon Benjamin Tristram White 

Mar. 18 Jaya Pareek 

Mar. 20 Alice Pattaranee Brooks 

Mar. 29 Elizabeth Catherine Andrews 

Mar. 29 Madeleine Patricia MacNeil 

Apr. 1 Ashley Marie Wilson 

Apr. 5 Julianne Elizabeth Tylko 

Apr. 9 Matthew William Johnson 

Apr. 14 Julia Stearns Welch 

Apr. 15 Alexandra Catherine Critch 



Jonathan & Nancy Donaldson 
James & Carol Wolff 
Mark & Jamie Banks 
Warren & Rosalyn Feldberg 
Dixon & Susan Woodbury 
Norbett Mintz & Carol 

Purdy-Mintz 
Eric & Tatiana Dessain 
Kenneth & Pamela Hurd 
Frederik & Catherine 

Wiersema 
Richard & Jane Aronson 
Stanley & Abbie White 
Purna & Anu Pareek 
Rodney & Phanwadee Brooks 
William & Catherine 

Andrews 
John & Madge MacNeil 
Robert & Jean Wilson 
John & Elizabeth Tylko 
Raymond Johnson & Martha 

Vaananen 
Nathaniel & Debra Welch 
William Critch & Dorina 

Lanza 



184 



Date of 
Birth 



Name of Child 



Names of Parents 



Michael Alexander Goldbaum 
Aidan Fitzgerald 

Lucy Ellen Green 
Amy Louise Briggs 
Fiona Taylor Brown 

Samuel Jacob Rogers 

June 7 Katherine Sachett Etcheverry 

Tiffany Edith Diarbakerly 
Benjamin Morris Allen 
David Joseph Gavrin 
Burton Alan Pegoraro 
Jonathan Leslie Perkins 
Courtney Gene Vat aha 
Winston Robert Chmielinski 

Justin Brehn Hamilton 

Flynn David Grinnan 
David Henry Sliski 

Sarah Parker Flint 
Seth Eaton Williams 
Kyle Christopher Byrnes 

Sept. 19 Tania Sarvenaz Abedian 

Sept. 26 Mia Elizabeth Cellucci 

Oct. 2 Noah Ruairidh Snyder MacNeil 

Oct. 19 Jesse Aaron Schacht 

Oct. 27 Robert Alejandro Agreda 

McCaughin 

Oct. 31 Alexandra Gray Henderson 

Nov. 1 Brendan Patrick Goddard 

Nov. 21 Jacqueline Lee Heinrich 



May 


1 


L Lay 


7 


May 


10 


May : 


25 


June 


2 


June 


4 


June 


7 


June 


8 


June 


16 


June 


20 


June 


23 


June 


26 


June 


28 


July 


2 


July 


4 


July 


7 


Aug. 


1 


Aug. 


8 


Aug. 


8 


Aug. 


26 



Michael & Wanda Goldbaum 
Michael & Kathleen 

Fitzgerald 
Robert & Therese Green 
Randal & Mary Briggs 
Richard Brown & Ann 

Jeff ers 
Joseph Rogers & Branka 

Starr 
Nicholas & Julianne 

Etcheverry 
Mark & Regina Diarbakerly 
Edwin & Phyllis Allen 
Edward & Jeanne Gavrin 
Alan & Karen Pegoraro 
Leonard & Michelle Perkins 
Randel & Deborah Vataha 
Robert & Tsun Ming 

Chmielinski 
Alan Hamilton & Linda 

Brehn 

Lewis & Marjorie Grinnan 
Alan Sliski & Susan Katz 

Sliski 
Jonathan & Alice Flint 
John Williams & Anne Eaton 
Francis Michael & Margaret 

Byrnes 
Behrouz & Abedian & 

Nasrin Rohani-Abedian 
Stephen & Elizabeth 

Cellucci 
Ronald & Wendy MacNeil 
Joel & Barbara Schacht 
Jose Agreda & Michelle 

McCaughin 
James & Nancy Henderson 
Glenn & Bridget Goddard 
Robert & Jane Heinrich 



185 



MARRIAGES 



Date of 



Marriage 


Names 


Residence 


Apr. 


24 


jean riane riot-iieu 
Catherine Hope Fisher 


ijincoiiij nass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 


May 21 


VaAraln T) Mr fa. hi 11 

Sarah Elizabeth Morse 


Rol fi'mnro MT) 

Da± LXLUUI C , 1 11J 

Lincoln, Mass. 


May 29 


John Wi 1 snn Lurvpv 
Susan Wendell Pike 


UCli. d O KJ t_ CI , X _l_d . 

Lincoln, Mass. 


June 


11 


ij pni a im d« r_Lxi.iL 

Nancy E. Bergen 


vjciirirxbon , in . i * 
Lincoln, Mass. 


June 


17 


T A 7o t*H oil T C\d t* m 23 T*. 
WdLUc J L JjUd Liiiclll 

Hyacinth Roach 


JjHICOIIIj ilcioo. 

Lincoln, Mass. 


June 


18 


■? 1-h Mflhnn 

IVCJltl- 1 IdllLFil 

Jeanne Marie desCognets 


I 1C J- J_ -LLLlCl l~ l\ j IN • 1 1 • 

Merrimack, N.H. 


June 


26 


All at. F» . Gordon 
Terri Gillman 


Lincoln Mp.<?^« 
Lincoln, Mass. 


July 


16 


l_) LcWal L. llct-Lo L CaU. 

Susan E. Sugar 


Matawan, N.J. 


July 23 


JLQWcilYCl ucOLgc OLacb 

Catherine Whitney Janes 


Carrboro, N.C. 


July 


23 


("la t~\t Ma rr\1 o 
vjcl j. y 1 la. x pic 

Meridith Rutter 


T i ripol n Ma c c 

ijlllLU-LU j lluOO • 

Lincoln, Mass. 


July 


30 


JOIin W • U oKi IT K.U 

Joan Berry 


R.CQWOOU OlLy ) ^alll« 

Redwood City, Calif. 


Aug. 


10 


Jon A Qoopr 

Victoria J. Rowntree 


Lincoln Mfl 4 ?*.. 
Lincoln, Mass. 


Aug. 


27 


TnnafVian P Cfoor 
JUtldLUdll JT • jLccL 

Katharine A. Sykes 


IvXllgo tUU , IN . ii . 

Kingston, N.H. 


Sept. 


4 


R ■? r» Vi a T*d A rn n 1 H l?at7maTi 

alLlldLU riXHUJ_U. IN. a. L -d ma. LI 

Alyson Ann Morse 


oumci VJ.XXC j iiciuoi 

Somerville, Mass. 


Sept. 


10 


John E. Dimitriou 
Ann A. Carley 


Stow, Mass. 
Stow, Mass. 


Sept. 


10 


Peter Joseph Linstrom 
Donna Elizabeth Snelling 


Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 



186 



Date of 
Marriage 



Names 



Residence 



oep C « 


1 7 


Rebecca A. Raja 


T . n n n n 1 n Ma c c 

JjIILLUIU y ildoo i 

Lincoln, Mass. 


oep l • 


i 7 


James neiier wj.rioK.uir 
Meaghan Elizabeth Redmond 


IN a L 1 C K. j via. S S • 

Lincoln, Mass. 


v_/v_ u ■ 


1 


f)a vi H N CJimn 

XJCL V -LLl ll . VJLiLlll 

Joan Mecsas 


Mfld"f cnn Wi 

Madison, Wise. 




2 


Karen M. Davidson 


T .nmnnp PA 

i-J vj LLI |J vj v_ ) V_> t\ 

Lompoc , CA 


Dr»1- 


8 


^1-pnhpn P YnallirV 

Elsa M. Keagy 


T i npnl n Ma c c 

J-i J- \J _L Li ^ lido O • 

Lincoln, Mass. 


UC L • 


9 


r LcUCilLK. \j • icip LJaXdi. Ll<J 

Georgia Koumantzelis 


N Whit-p Plfl-inQ NY 
in. win uc rialilo • in • i • 

Lincoln, Mass. 




10 


CJiiv PpTToiilf 

\_7 Li V ICLLuUlL. 

Kimberly Ann Rossi 


T.i npn1 n Mfl «? 

Lincoln, Mass. 


Oct . 


22 


Hptitv RAnd*? SlAvfpr 
Barbara Pinney Thomas 


T.l'nf oln Maqq. 

-1—1 i.llLWXU j 1 1UO O . 

West Newton, Mass. 


Oct . 


30 


(Jlppn F.pward Matot 

vjJ-diii Jjtwaiu iiaLUL 

Gail Jean Cotoia 


Hnd«?nn Ma^s. 
Lincoln, Mass. 


Nov . 


A 


Tomoo T7 Ur>1 n nan Tt* 
u a. m c o Hi. nux Xiicxu , ji . 

Kathy J. Copeland 


Xj J.I1CO-LI1 , llcxofa. 

Lincoln, Mass. 


Nov > 


6 


C f-Q tiVi on Root 1o 

Ann Howard 


T i nr> a1 t\ Ma g c 
ijlilLUU.il) lido o # 

Lincoln, Mass. 


Nov. 


20 


Mark Allen Haney 
Roberta Joy Fine 


Randolph, Mass. 
Nashua, N.H. 


Dec. 


23 


Duane Allen Mallows 
Minette V. Moore-Meehan 


Merrimack, N.H. 
Merrimack, N.H. 



187 



Date of 
Death 



DEATHS 

Name Years 



1987 






Apr. 26 


Salvatore Panetta 


67 


Nov. 10 


Edfirede C. Maclaurin 


77 


Nov. 11 


Marietta Shepherd 


84 


Dec. 23 


James DeNormandie 


80 


1988 






Jan. 11 


Dora Alberta Robinson 


82 


Jan. 24 


David Oaks Johnston 


67 


Feb. 13 


James Demetrios G. Kardaras 


61 


Feb. 21 


Jane Agnes Willemin 


76 


Feb. 27 


Yetta Reinherz 


85 


Mar. 8" 


Mary J. Schofield 


81 


Mar. 25 


Eleanor Hope Bovey 


86 


Apr. 5 


Richard Lesley Divoll 


28 


Apr. 21 


Tamar E. Cordin 


86 


May 2 


Andrew Joseph Kelley 


68 


May 3 


Helen B. Williams * 


93 


May 8 


Denny Sou-Ching Tong 


16 


May 13 


John B. Garrison 


79 


May 26 


Margaret Loretta Hosey 


78 


June 3 


Nancy C. Perry 


69 


June 24 


Elizabeth Florence Wagner 


76 


July 7 


Charlotte Louise Donaldson 


76 


July 11 


Marguerite T. Florance 


88 


July 19 


Mabelle Augusta Rogers 


88 


July 27 


Augusta Elizabeth Tingey 


101 


July 29 


Isabelle Cummings 


56 


Aug . 16 


Virginia S. Dillman 


68 


Aug. 28 


Michael Patrick Ryan 


22 


Sept. 27 


Donald A. Gilfoy 


69 


Oct. 11 


Jessie Proctor 


92 


Nov. 2 


Victor A. Lutnicki 


73 


Dec. 14 


Rosa M. Rosskopk 


87 



188 



COMMISSIONERS OF TRUST FUNDS 



George C. Hibben 

Virginia M. Niles 

William B. Russell, Chairman 



During the fiscal year ended June 30, 1988 bequests, income 
and principal available for investment were invested in Treasury 
securities. Maturity dates were selected to provide maximum 
flexibility for future use or reinvestment. 

In June 1988 the Treasurer and the Commissioners elected to 
place the Trust Fund Securities with an institutional 
custodian. The institution will provide brokerage services, 
income collection and reporting, as well as a monthly statement 
of cash and security positions. 

The Commissioners also initiated a program to review and 
issue year-end financial reports to Fund administrators as soon 
as prepared and audited. This program was implemented with 
reports issued to all the Administrators in December 1988. 
Heretofore, these reports were not available until March of the 
ensuing fiscal year when distributed as part of the Town's 
Annual Report. 

The Commissioners are deeply appreciative of Madge Fisher, 
the Assistant Treasurer, for her support. She will be sorely 
missed when she retires in Febuary 1989, but we wish her well. 



189 



BEMIS LECTURE FUND 



Administered by three elected Trustees 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1987 $525.57 
Receipts : 

Interest Income 3,344.14 
Interest applied to amortize bond premiums 229.38 
Securities matured 3,000.00 
Securites called 3,000.00 
Transfer from MMDT 13,000.00 

$23,099.09 

Payments: 

Honoraria per order of Trustees 

Maxine Kumin 1,700.00 
Anthony Lewis 2,500.00 
-Doris Goodwin 2,200.00 
Lecture Expenses 100.00 
Printing and Postage 855.95 
Fees 69.00 
Safe Deposit Box Rent 7.50 
Purchase of Securities 9,122.51 
Accrued Interest 151.02 
Interest allowed to accumulate 1,279.14 
Transfer to MMDT 3,500.00 21,485.12 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1988 $1,613.97 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1988 

Bay Bank Middlesex 1,613.97 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund 15,088.12 

$3,000 Pacific Tel & Tel. 4.375% 8/15/88 3,000.00 

$1,000 So. Cal. Edison 4.50% 2/15/90 1,000.00 

$3,000 U.S. Treasury 7.875% 6/30/91 3,000.00 

$3,000 N.E. Power Co. 4.625% 2/15/90 3,000.00 

$3,000 Fed. Nat'l Mortgage 7.05% 6/10/92 2,970.00 

$3,000 U.S. Treasury 7.25% 8/15/92 3,000.00 

$3,000 U.S. Treasury 10.875% 2/15/93 2,958.75 

$4,000 U.S. Treasury 9.00% 2/15/94 4,000.00 

$3,000 Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe 4.00% 10/1/95 3,000.00 

$2,000 U.S. Treasury 10.875% 2/15/96 2,043.13 

$2,000 Commonwealth Edison 8.00% 8/1/01 1,947.50 

$46,621.47 

Accumulated Income 14,568.15 

Principal 32,053.32 

$46,621.47 



190 



ABBIE J. STEARNS FUND FOR THE SILENT POOR 
Administered by the Board of Selectmen 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1987 $78.93 
Receipts : 

Interest Income 177.92 

Transfer from MMDT 500.00 

$756.85 

Payments: 

Grant 322.00 

Interest allowed to accumulate 62.92 384.92 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1988 $371.93 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1988 

BayBank Middlesex 371.93 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund 551.17 

$1,000 U.S. Treasury 11.50% 10/15/90 1,000.00 

$1,923.10 

Accumulated Income 698.05 

Principal 1,225.05 

$1,923.10 

JOHN TODD TRUST FUND 
Administered by the Board of Selectmen and 
the Bemis Lecture Trustees 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1987 $402.65 
Receipts: 

Interest Income 4,343.74 

$4,746.39 

Payments: 

Interest allowed to accumulate 138.74 

Transfer to MMDT 3,000.00 3,138.74 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1988 $1,607.65 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1988 

BayBank Middlesex 1,607.65 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund 3,911.09 

$14,000 U.S. Treasury 13.75% 5/15/92 13,825.00 

$15,000 Fed. Farm Credit 15.20% 1/20/92 15,000.00 

$34,343.74 



Accumulated Income 4,343.74 
Principal 30,000.00 

$34,343.74 



191 



CEMETERY PERPETUAL CARE FUND 



Administered by the Cemetery Commissioners 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1987 $28,552.67 
Receipts: 

Interest Income 1,760.27 

Perpetual Care Payment 50.00 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1988 $30,362.94 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1988 

Middlesex Savings Bank - Income Account $12,250.67 
Middlesex Savings Bank - Time Deposit 8.00% 2/13/90 18,112.27 

$30,362.94 

Principal 18,112.27 
Accumulated Income 12,250.67 

$30,362.94 



Mildred Ballou 


$ 500.00 


Julia A. Bemis 


300.00 


William W. Benjamin 


500.00 


Bethany, Order of St. Anne 


1,000.00 


Marie H. Bisbee 


200.00 


Mildred E. Bowles 


200.00 


Agnes L. Brown 


300.00 


George Browning 


200.00 


Sarah J. Browning 


200.00 


John H. Cantlin 


100.00 


Elizabeth G. Chapin 


300.00 


Robert B. Chapin 


300.00 


William N. Costello 


100.00 


Mary H. Cushing 


100.00 


Anthony J. Doherty 


500.00 


Paul Dorian 


150.00 


Gregory Faddoul 


50.00 


Charles P. Farnsworth 


350.00 


Edward R. Farrar 


300.00 


Frances Flint 


250.00 


Orila J. Flint 


300.00 


Donald Gordon 


300.00 


Raymond E. Haggerty 


150.00 


George Harrington 


100.00 


Samuel Hartwell 


300.00 


Thomas Huddles ton 


200.00 


Abijah G. Jones 


300.00 


M. Gertrude Kelley 


300.00 


John J. Kelliher 


200.00 


Byron Lunt 


300.00 



192 



Donald Millard 


550.00 


Gardner Moore 


300.00 


Lena M. Newell 


325.00 


Joa Pacewicz 


400.00 


John H. Pierce 


500.00 


Anne D. Pollard 


300.00 


Charles 0. Preble 


100.00 


Annie A. Ray 


300.00 


Mary Susan Rice 


87.27 


E. H. Rogers 


250.00 


F. B. Sargent 


200.00 


Mary James Scripture 


500.00 


Eugene Sherman 


200.00 


Charles S. Smith 


300.00 


J. Waldo Smith 


300.00 


Webster Smith 


300.00 


Helen 0. Storrow 


2,000.00 


George G. Tarbell 


400.00 


Laura B. and Arthur E. Thiessen 


500.00 


Maria L. Thompson 


500.00 


Mabel H. Todd 


200.00 


Ellen T. Trask 


200.00 


Albert Washburn 


500.00 


Elizabeth S. Wheeler 


200.00 


Ellen F. Whitney 


100.00 


Lewis W. Woodworth 


150.00 


J. S. Wible 


100.00 




$18,112.27 



193 



TRI CENTENNIAL TRUST FUND 



Administered by the Board of Selectmen 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1987 
Receipts : 

Interest Income 



Payments: 
None 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1988 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1988 
West Newton Savings Bank 



Accumulated Income 
Principal 



DONALD GORDON RECREATION FUND 

Administered by the Board of Selectmen 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1987 
Receipts: 

Interest Income 

Interest applied to amortize bond premiums 
Payments: 

Safe Deposit Box Rent , 7.50 

Interest allowed to accumulate 79.54 
Transfer to MMDT 500.00 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1988 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1988 

BayBank Middlesex 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund 

$1,000 So. Cal. Edison 4.50% 2/15/90 

$1,000 U.S. Treasury 11.50% 10/15/90 

$1,000 Fed. Nat'l Mortgage 7.05% 6/10/92 

$1,000 U.S. Treasury 10.875% 2/15/93 

$1,000 So. Pac. Co. 10.35% 7/1/94 



Accumulated Income 
Principal 



194 



LINCOLN CONSERVATION FUND 



Administered by the Board of Selectmen 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1987 $0.00 
Receipts : 

Interest Income 59.32 

$59.32 

Payments: 

Interest allowed to accumulate 59.32 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1988 $0.00 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1988 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund $918.37 

$918.37 

Principal and Accumulated Income $918.37 

JANE HAMILTON POOR SCHOLARSHIP 

Administered by the Board of Selectmen 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1987 $0.00 
Receipts: 

Interest Income 108.35 
Term Deposit matured 2,774.91 

Transfer from MMDT 372.13 3,255.39 

Interest applied to amortize note premiums 44.06 

$3,299.45 

Payments: 

Interest allowed to accumulate 17.41 
Purchase of Securities 3,044.06 
Accrued Interest 90.98 

Wire Charges 12.00 3,164.45 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1988 $135.00 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1988 

MMDT-Composite Trust Fund 82.52 

BayBank/Middlesex 135 . 00 

$3,000 U.S. Treasury 9.00% 2/15/94 3,000.00 

$3,217.52 

Accumulated Income 1,982.52 

Principal 1,235.00 

$3,217.52 



195 



JOSEPH BROOKS GRAMMAR SCHOOL FUND 



Administered by the Board of Selectmen 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1987 $25.56 
Receipts: 

Interest Income 208.79 

$234.35 

Payments: 

Interest allowed to accumulate 24.35 

Paid to Town of Lincoln 79.44 103.79 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1988 $130.56 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1988 

BayBank Middlesex 130.56 
MMDT Composite Trust Fund 329.70 
$1,000 U.S. Treasury 10.50% 4/15/90 1,000.00 

$1,460.26 

Accumulated Income 242.99 
Principal 1,217.27 

$1,460.26 



LAWRENCE H. GREEN FUND 

Administered by the President of the Lincoln PTA, the 
Chairman of the Lincoln Elementary School Committee and the 
Superintendent of the Lincoln Elementary Schools. 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1987 $50.00 
Receipts : 

Interest Income , 145.61 

$195.61 

Payments: 

Awards 45.00 

Interest allowed to accumulate 40.61 85.61 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1988 $110.00 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1988 

BayBank Middlesex 110.00 
MMDT Composite Trust Fund 628.56 
$1,000 U.S. Treasury 10.50% 4/15/90 1,000.00 

$1,738.56 

Accumulated Income 430.91 
Principal 1,307.65 

$1,738.56 



196 



CHRISTINE PATTERSON FUND 



Administered by the Principal of the Brooks or Hartwell 
School, a staff member of the Brooks or Hartwell School, and a 
parent selected by the Board of Directors of the Lincoln PTA. 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1987 
Receipts : 

Interest Income 
Contributions 
Transfer from MMDT 



Payments: 
Arts Week 

Purchase of Securities 

Wire Charge 

Accrued Interest 

Interest allowed to accumulate 

Transfer to MMDT 



500.00 
1,021.56 
4.00 
13.90 
79.35 
1,000.00 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1988 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1988 

BayBank Middlesex 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund 

$10,000 Fed. Nat'l Mort. 7.35% 4/10/90 

$1,000 U.S. Treasury 8.875% 2/15/96 



Accumulated Income 
Principal 



LINCOLN STABILIZATION FUND 
Administered by the Board of Selectmen 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1987 
Receipts : 

Interest Income 



Payments : 

Interest allowed to accumulate 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1988 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1988 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund 



$367.89 

814.35 
210.50 
1,300.00 
$2,692.74 



2,618.81 
$73.93 



73.93 
1,063.58 
10,000.00 
1,021.56 
$12,159.07 

939.02 
11,220.05 
$12,159.07 



$0.00 
48.69 



$48.69 



48.69 



$0.00 



$753.40 
$753.40 



Principal and Accumulated Income 



$753.40 



197 



DECORDOVA SCHOOL EQUIPMENT FUND 



Administered by the Board of Selectmen 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1987 
Receipts : 

Interest Income 
Securities matured 

Interest applied to amortize bond premiums 
Transfer from MMDT 



$9.65 

2,585.39 
4,000.00 
79.37 
1,200.00 
$7,874.41 



Payments: 

Paid to Town of Lincoln 
Safe Deposit Box Rent 
Interest allowed to accumulate 
Purchase of Securities 
Accrued Interest 
Wire Charges 
Transfer to MMDT 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1988 



650.30 
7.50 
112.45 
4,072.50 
88.44 
16.00 
2,000.00 



6,947.19 
$927.22 



Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1988 



BayBank Middlesex 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund 

$1,000 Pacific Tel. & Tel. Co. 4.375% 8/15/88 
$1,000 Pacific Gas & Electric 5.00% 6/1/89 
$1,000 So. Cal. Edison 4.50% 2/15/90 
$3,000 U.S. Treasury 11.50% 10/15/90 
$4,000 Federal Nat'l Mortgage 7.05% 6/10/92 
$2,000 U.S. Treasury 9.00% 2/15/94 
$1,000 Southern Pacific Co. 10.35% 7/1/94 
$2,000 U.S. Treasury 12.625% 5/15/95 
$2,000 U.S. Treasury 8.875% 2/15/96 
$2,000 Southern N.E. Telephone 5.75% 11/1/96 
$1,000 Commonwealth Edison 8.00% 8/1/01 
$1,000 American Tel. & Tel. 8.625% 2/1/07 
$3,000 U.S. Treasury 8.75% 11/15/08 



927.22 
2,205.72 
1,000.00 
1,000.00 
1,000.00 
3,000.00 
3,960.00 
2,000.00 
1,000.00 
1,962.50 
2,043.13 
2,000.00 
973.75 
978.75 
2,925.00 
$26,976.07 



Principal and Accumulated Income 



$26,976.07 



198 



LINCOLN SCHOLARSHIP FUND 



Administered by three Trustees, one each appointed by the 
Selectmen, the Lincoln School Committee and the Town Moderator 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1987 
Receipts : 

Interest Income 
General Appeal 
Securities matured 
Transfer from MMDT 



$1,203.88 

8,828.83 
2,820.00 
10,000.00 
30,500.00 
$53,352.71 



Payments: 

Grants per order of Trustees 3,000.00 

Printing and Postage 584.97 

Safe Deposit Box Rent 7.50 

Interest allowed to accumulate 1,527.81 

Purchase of Securities 34,119.06 

Accrued Interest 511.76 

Wire Charges 156.00 

Transfer to MMDT 11,500.00 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1988 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1988 



51,407.10 
$1,945.61 



BayBank Middlesex 

MMDT Composite Trust Fund 

$1,000 Pacific Gas & Electric 5.00% 6/1/89 
$5,000 U.S. Treasury 11.875% 10/15/89 
$1,000 So. Cal. Edison 4.50% 2/15/90 
$4,000 U.S. Treasury 10.50% 4/15/90 
$6,000 U.S. Treasury 11.75% 1/15/91 
$15,000 U.S. Treasury 7.875% 3/31/92 
$1,000 U.S. Treasury 13.75% 5/15/92 
$11,000 U.S. Treasury 10.875% 2/15/93 
$10,000 U.S. Treasury 10.125% 11/15/94 
$5,000 Ohio Power Co. 5.00% 1/1/96 
$9,000 U.S. Treasury 10.875% 2/15/96 
$6,000 So. N.E. Telephone 5.75% 11/1/96 
$10,000 U.S. Treasury 8.50% 5/15/97 
$5,000 Commonwealth Edison 8.00% 8/1/01 
320 Shares Exxon Corporation 
100 Shares NIPSCO Industries, Inc. 

Principal and Accumulated Income 
Robert L. DeNormandie Fund 
Lincoln 4-H Horse Club Fund 
Ernest P. Neumann Memorial Fund 
Eleanor Tead Fund 
Ogden Codman Endowment Fund 
General Fund 



1,000.00 
1,770.00 
6,005.00 
1,120.00 
9,645.00 
83,575.53 



1,945.61 
7,075.37 
1,000.00 
4,946.88 
1,000.00 
4,000.00 
6,000.00 
14,981.25 
1,000.00 
10,181.88 
10,000.00 
4,987.50 
9,194.06 
6,000.00 
9,943.75 
4,868.75 
3,016.85 
2,973.63 
$103,115.53 



$103,115.53 



199 



JOHN H. PIERCE LEGACY 



Administered by the Board of Selectmen and managed by the 
Pierce Property Committee 



Cash Balance at June 30, 1987 




$11,695.90 


Receipts: 






Interest Income 




12 929 36 


Use of Pierce House - Fees and Deposits 


51,285.00 


Elsie Pierce Trust 




4,545.21 


Securities matured 




25,000.00 


Interest applied to amortize bond premiums 


758.75 


Transfer from MMDT 




3,000.00 






$109,214.22 


Payments : 






Grants per order of the Selectmen 






COA - Podiatry Clinic 


1,500.00 




60+ Health Clinic 


1,208.00 




Pierce House Expenses 






Supplies and Furnishings 


5,633.67 




lY KZ U d J_ i. o CLLLkX L let _L LI L- C LLd LLK^ t- 


4 069 04 




Manager Compensation 


9,892.34 




(Zzi c "Fr^T* Vi o a t~ T v\ o* 

VJCl O lUl liCd L-H-lt 


2 972 34 




Other Utilities 


3,266.65 




Mnwn t\& Pi ptpp t*V 

IlUWlUH I 1C1LC <LCLJ.1V 


3 01 6 11 




Rubbish Removal 


3,067.19 




Police Details & Conserv. labor 


126.63 




Return of Deposits 


18,750.00 




Safe Deposit Box Rent 


37.50 




Interest allowed to accumulate 


4,049.18 




Purchase of Securities 


25,730.31 




Accrued Interest 


302.23 




Wire Charges 


80.00 




Transfer to MMDT 


19,000.00 


102,701.19 


Cash Balance at June 30, 1988 




$6,513.03 


Cash and Securities at cost - 


June 30, 1988 




Unrestricted as to Principal and Income 




BayBank Middlesex 


6,513.03 




MMDT Composite Trust Fund 


70,831.05 




$5,000 Pac. T.& T.Co. 4.375% 8/15/88 


5,000.00 




$2,000 Fed. Nat'l Mtge. 7.05% 6/10/92 


1,980.00 




$3,000 U.S. Treas. 7.25% 8/15/92 


3,000.00 




$5,000 U.S. Treas. 10.875% 2/15/93 


4,931.25 




$3,000 U.S. Treas. 9.00% 2/15/94 


3,000.00 




$1,000 So. Pac. Co. 10.35% 7/1/94 


1,000.00 




$1,000 U.S. Treas. 8.875% 2/15/96 


1,021.56 




$5,000 U.S. Treas. 8.75% 11/15/08 


4,875.00 


$102,151.89 



200 



JOHN H. PIERCE LEGACY 



Restricted as to Principal 

Union Warren Savings Bank 1,087.30 

$10,000 Fed. Nat'l Mtge. 7.05% 6/10/92 9,900.00 

$10,000 U.S. Treas. 7.25% 8/15/92 9,937.50 

$10,000 So. Cal. Ed. Co. 7.125% 1/15/94 10,000.00 

$1,000 U.S. Treas. 9.00% 2/15/94 1,000.00 

$20,000 U.S. Treas. 9.50% 11/15/95 20,000.00 

$10,000 Ohio Power Co. 5.00% 1/1/96 9,975.00 

$5,000 So. N.E. Tel. Co. 5.75% 11/1/96 5,000.00 

$10,000 Fla. P & L Co. 6.00% 12/1/96 10,000.00 

$10,000 Pac. Gs & Ele. Co. 4.625% 6/1/97 10,000.00 

$10,000 Am. T & T Co. 4.75% 6/1/98 10,000.00 

$10,000 Duke Power Co. 7.00% 2/1/99 10,000.00 

$10,000 S.W. Bell Tel. Co. 8.25% 3/1/14 9,503.50 



Principal and Accumulated Income 



$ 116,403.30 
$218,555.19 

$218,555.19 



201 



LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS 



Administered by the Library Trustees 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1987 $438.71 
Receipts: 

Interest Income by Fund 



Codman Library Trust Fund 


82.51 


Mary Jane Murray Farnsworth, 




& Murray P. Farnsworth Fund 


163.85 


Alice Downing Hart & 




Olive Beatrice Floyd Fund 


139.85 


Hugh Anthony Gaskill Fund 


19.48 


John H. Pierce Library Fund 


65.60 


George Russell Library Fund 


31.02 


Abbie J. Stearns Library Fund 


143.59 


George G. Tarbell Fund 


356.50 


C. Edgar Wheeler & 




Elizabeth S. Wheeler Fund 


102.70 


George C. Tarbell & 




Eleanor F. Tarbell Fund 


1,430.85 


Lincoln Library Fund 


64.06 


Katherine S. Bolt Fund 


139.35 


John W. Carman & 




Eleanor Tarbell Carman Fund 


3,851.83 



6,591.19 

Rentals - Thiessen 8.40 
Securities matured 2,000.00 
Int. applied to amort, bond premiums 36.25 
Transfer from MMDT 1,000.00 

$10,074.55 

Payments: 

Purchase of Books and Tapes 1,862.00 
Safe Deposit Box Rent 7.50 
Interest allowed to accumulate 1,717.19 
Purchase of Securities 3,036.25 
Accrued Interest 61.30 
Wire Charges 23.00 
Transfer to MMDT 2,200.00 8,907.24 

Cash Balance at June 30, 1988 $1,167.31 

Cash and Securities at cost - June 30, 1988 

Accumulated 

Bay Bank Middlesex Income Principal Total 

General Funds 1167.31 $1167.31 



202 



LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS 



Accumulated 



MMDT Composite Trust Fund 


Income 


Principal 




Total 


Codman Library Trust Fund 


277.06 


1,000.00 


1 


,277.06 


Mary Jane Murray Farnsworth & 










Murray F. Farnsworth Fund 


1,411.12 


1,000.00 


2 


,411.12 


Alice Downing Hart & 










Olive Beatrice Floyd Fund 


139.85 


1,000.00 


1 


,139.85 


Hugh Anthony Gaskill Fund 


19.48 


144.00 




163.48 


John H. Pierce Library Fund 


8.10 


117.21 




125.31 


George Russell Library Fund 


31.02 


415.74 




446.76 


Abbie J. Stearns Library Fund 


66.43 


973.75 


1 


,040.18 


George G. Tarbell Library Fund 


619.07 


138.36 




757.43 


C. Edgar Wheeler & 










Elizabeth S. wheeler Fund 


25.70 


273.52 




299.22 


George G. Tarbell & 










Eleanor F. Tarbell Fund 


10,728.76 


75.00 


10 


,803.76 


Lincoln Library Fund 


6.56 


0.00 




6.56 


Katherine S. Bolt Fund 


531.23 


0.00 




531.23 


John W. Carman & 










Eleanor Tarbell Carman Fund 


6,637.70 


0.00 


6 


,637.70 


Lucretia Jones Hoover Fund 


27.59 


2,200.00 


2 


,227.59 




$20,529.67 


$7,337.58 


$27 


,867.25 



Securities 

John H. Pierce Library Fund 
$1,000 So. NE Tel. Co. 5.75% 11/1/96 

Abbie J. Stearns Library Fund 
$3,000 U.S. Treasury 9.00% 2/15/94 

George G. Tarbell Library Fund 
$1,000 So. NE Tel. Co. 5.75% 11/1/96 
$1,000 U.S. Treasury 11.50% 10/15/90 
$1,000 U.S. Treasury 7.875% 6/1/91 

George G. & Eleanor F. Tarbell Fund 
$10,000 DuQuesne Light 7.00% 1/1/99 

C. Edgar & Elizabeth S. Wheeler Fund 
$1,000 U.S. Treasury 9.00% 2/15/94 

Lincoln Library Fund 
$1,000 So. NE Tel. Co. 5.75% 11/1/96 

John W. & Eleanor Tarbell Carman Fund 
$12,000 U.S. Treasury 11.875% 10/15/89 
$3,000 U.S. Treasury 10.50% 4/15/90 
$9,000 U.S. Treasury 13.75% 5/15/92 
$6,000 U.S. Treasury 10.125% 11/15/94 

Katherine S. Bolt Fund 
$1,000 U.S. Treasury 10.50% 4/15/90 



Accumulated Income 
Principal 



Principal 

1,000.00 

1,000.00 

1,000.00 
1,000.00 
1,000.00 

9,925.00 

1,000.00 

1,000.00 

12,000.00 
3,000.00 
9,000.00 
6,000.00 

1,000.00 



47,925.00 
$76,959.56 

21,696.98 
55,262.58 
$76,959.56 



203 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1988 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 





Real Estate 


Tax 


Abbott, John & Diana 


$ 425,000 


$ 4,165.00 


Abbott, Margaret & Walter 


273,100 


2,676.38 


Abedian, Behrouz & Nasrin 


343,800 


3,369.24 


Abele, Bradford & Rosemary 


556,900 


5,457.62 


Abrashkin, Diana 


211,800 


2,075.64 


Achtmeyer, William & Candace 


322,200 


2,925.58 


Ackley, Wallace & Ethel 


1,500 


14.70 


Adams, F. Douglas & Patricia 


439,100 


4,303.18 


Adams, George & Velda 


445,700 


4,367.86 


Adams, John Quincy & Lucy 


684,300 


6,706.14 


Adams, John/Pat/Peter/Sharon 


888,800 


8,710.24 


Adams, Lemire & Donaldson 


476,600 


4,670.68 


Adams, Ramelle 


1,349,700 


13,227.06 


Adams Family Realty Trust 


378,000 


3,704.40 


Adamson, William & Barbara 


422,100 


4,136.58 


Adelstein, Mary & James 


206,700 


2,025.66 


Adkins, Robert & Alison 


399,600 


3,916.08 


Adler, Bruce 


176,100 


1,725.78 


Adler, Harold & Ivy 


683,200 


6,695.36 


Adler, Ivy Ruth 


23,200 


227.36 


Ahern, Mary Jo/Seronde , Pierre 


469,300 


4,599.14 


Alam, Mahbub-ul & Momtaz 


625,300 


6,127.94 


Alam, Umme Salma Momtaz 


212,100 


2,078.58 


Alfieris, Michael 


241,800 


2,369.64 


Algeo, Leo & Elaine 


302,200 


2,961.56 


Allen II, Edwin 


' 560,900 


5,496.82 


Allen, Robert & Carol 


367,900 


3,605.42 


Allen, Rosamond 


311,700 


3,054.66 


Allen, Ruth 


764,400 


7,491.12 


Allen, Stephen 


245,300 


2,403.94 


Allison, Caroline 


312,500 


3,062.50 


Allison, G. & L./Burk, G. & R 


432,000 


4,233.60 


Allison, John & Marion 


287,400 


2,816.52 


Althausen, Alex & Emily 


596,300 


5,843.74 


Ames III, Adelbert & Mary 


558,900 


5,477.22 


Ames , James & Suzannah 


633,000 


6,203.40 


Aramen, David & Judith 


764,200 


7,489.16 


Amoruso, Renee 


222,200 


2,177.56 


Anderson, Carl 


379,900 


3,723.02 


Anderson, David & Elaine 


294,400 


2,885.12 


Anderson, Lawrence & Rosina 


451,000 


4,419.80 


Anderson, Mildred 


295,600 


2,896.88 


Andley, Kaushal & Usha 


280,200 


2,745.96 


Andrews, Francis & Dorothy 


799,000 


7,830.20 


Angell, Craig & Carolyn 


550,100 


5,390.98 


Appleyard, Norman & Lillian 


295,000 


2,891.00 


Aprille, Thomas & Amelia 


155,800 


1,526.84 


Apsler, Robert & Jacquelin 


174,700 


1,712.06 


Arista, Miguel 


282,400 


2,767.52 



204 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1988 







Aggregate Value 
Real Estate 


Real Estate 
Tax 


Armstrong, C. Robert 




$ 482,500 


$ 4,728.50 


Armstrong, Elayne 




262,900 


2,576.42 


Armstrong, John & Joanne 




802,200 


7,861.56 


Arnold, Warren & Barbara 




473,300 


4,638.34 


Aronson, Richard & Jane 




586,700 


5,749.66 


Arshad, Gulrez & Sara 




723,300 


7,088.34 


Art, Robert & Suzanne 




279,100 


2,735.18 


Arthur J & Young C 




619,400 


6,070.12 


Asadorian, Alan & Melanie 




360,900 


3,536.82 


Asaff, Annis & Patricia 




470,000 


4,606.00 


Atchley Jr, Dana & Barbara 




585,400 


5,736.92 


Atkins, John & Jamie 




287,800 


2,820.44 


Atlas, S. & Wilkerson R 




422,800 


4,143.44 


Austin, Richard & Marcia 




521,900 


5,114.62 


Avery, Abigail 




420,400 


4,119.92 


Ayer, J Bruce & Marilyn 




241,800 


2,369.64 


Azrak, Joseph 




1,106,400 


10,842.72 


B H N Realty Trust 




1,500 


14.70 


Bachrach Jr, Alan 




460,800 


4,515.84 


Bacon, Anne 




275,800 


2,702.84 


Baggs, Arthur & Marion 




426,200 


4,176.76 


Baher, Carabiz & Constance 




849,600 


8,326.08 


Baird, Gordon & Sarah 




683,600 


6,699.28 


Baldwin, Jacqueline 




242,600 


2,377.48 


Baldwin, Roger & Mary 




441,000 


4,321.80 


Balogh, Karoly & Judith 




523,300 


5,128.34 


Banks, Jamie & Mark 




363,100 


3,558.38 


Barbarow, Ruth 




123,400 


1,209.32 


Bardsley, Theodore & Doris 




258,200 


2,530.36 


Bare , Bruce & Helen 




429,200 


4,206.16 


Barkas, Christopher & Mary 




274,700 


2,692.06 


Barmakian, Frank & Norma 




532,800 


5,221.44 


Barnaby, John & Charlotte 




267,800 


2,624.44 


Barnes, Benjamin & Ann 




462,500 


4,532.50 


Barnet, James 




529,900 


5,193.02 


Barrett, Beatrice 




597,000 


5,850.60 


Barry, Jon & Barbara 




543,100 


5,322.38 


Bartovics, William & Susan 




373,500 


3,660.30 


Basile, Patrick & Judith 




391,500 


3,836.70 


Basraajian, Vasken & Shohig 




387,400 


3,796.52 


Bassett, Kenneth 




375,200 


3,676.96 


Beal, Bruce & Enid 




701,200 


6,871.76 


Beal Jr., Thomas & Barbara 




794,900 


7,790.02 


Beenhower, Owen & Lillemor 




434,200 


4,255.16 


Belanger, Michael & Gisa 




204,900 


2,008.02 


Bell, Roger & Barbara W. 




322,500 


3,160.50 


Belle, Gene & Irene 




405,700 


3,975.86 




205 







VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1988 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 





Real Estate 


Tax 


Bemis Ann 


$ 278,200 


$ 2,726.36 


Bennett, Doris 


323,200 


3,167.36 


Benson, John & Kathryn A. 


303,500 


2,974.30 


Benson, Peter & Ann 


287,100 


2,813.58 


Bentley Barbara 


109,300 


1,071.14 


Bent ley, Joyce 


496,300 


4,863.74 


Bentley, Robert 


249,000 


2,440.20 


Benton, Stephen & Jeanne 


352,800 


3,457.44 


Bergen, Kenneth & Emily 


819,400 


8,030.12 


Bergen, Kenneth Dana 


180,700 


1,770.86 


Berger, Ralph & Carol 


392,100 


3,842.58 


Berkenkamp, Anne & John 


723,800 


7,093.24 


Berman, Diane/Cohen, Donald 


376,200 


3,686.76 


Bernard, Clark & Susana 


612,000 


5,997.60 


Bibring, George & Marcia 


280,700 


2,750.86 


Bickford, Helen & Scott 


475,300 


4,657.94 


Biel, Fredrick & Carolyn 


639,700 


6,269.06 


Bienfang, Don & Denise 


392,600 


3,847.48 


Bikales, Norman & Ann 


833,300 


8,166.34 


Billings, Bruce 


130,300 


1,276.94 


Billings, Despena & Thomas 


412,400 


4,041.52 


Billings, Sarah 


113,200 


1,109.36 


Birmingham, James & Carolyn 


506,900 


4,967.62 


Bishop, Robert & Sarah 


419,700 


4,113.06 
4,189.50 


Bjork, Elizabeth 


427,500 


Black, Jerry & Eva 


340,800 


3,339.84 


Black, Stanley 


183,600 


1,799.28 


Black, Thomas 


186,000 


1,822.80 


Blacker, Lawrence 


391,700 


3,838.66 


Blanchard, Eileen 


245,100 


2,401.98 


Blatt, Thomas & Ann Waldron 


311,500 


3,052.70 


Blood, David & Iva Dane 


258,200 


2,530.36 


Bloom, Elaine & Laurence 


366,200 


3,588.76 


Bobbitt, Lake & Sarah 


317,300 


3,109.54 


Boccadoro, Joseph & Ida 


49,800 


488.04 


Bockoven, John & Dorothy 


326,000 


3,194.80 


Bogner, Walter 


456,200 


4,470.76 


Bohlen, Jack & Alice 


463,700 


4,544.26 


Bolt, Richard & Katherine 


657,300 


6,441.54 


Bolton, Warren & Doris 


34,600 


339.08 


Bombara, John & Maria 


316,800 


3,104.64 


Bond, Roger & Elizabeth 


294,900 


2,890.02 


Booth, Alice 


47,300 


463.54 


Booth, Robert 


696,500 


6,825.70 


Boquist, Wallace 


933,200 


9,145.36 


Boshco, Margaret 


383,300 


3,756.34 


Boston Edison Co. 


172,900 


1,694.42 


Boston Higashi School 


1,589,200 


15,574.16 


Boudris, Edward & Mary M. 


548,700 


5,377.26 



206 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1988 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 





Real Estate 


Tax 


Bovey, Martin & Eleanor 


$ 310,500 


$ 3,042.90 


Bower, Joseph & Nancy 


633,600 


6,209.28 


Bowers, Spotswood 


297 ,200 


2,912.56 


Bowles, Clifford 


483,200 


4, 735.36 


Boyce, Manley 


ono onn 
ZUo , oUU 


O A /. C O /. 

z ,046 .Z4 


Boyce , Manley & Karen 


one O A A 
396 ,o00 


3,888.64 


Boyer, John 


aoq Ann 
4Z y , 4UU 


/■ 9nQ 1 9 

4 , ZUo . 1Z 


Boyer, Markley & Julie 


oU / , OUU 


7 Q 1 A A A 
1 , 7lO . 44 


Boyle, Donald & Judith 


990, qnn 

ZZ? , ?UU 


9 9^9 no 

Z , ZD J . UZ 


Boynton, Daniel & Janet 


9A9 7nn 
Z4 J , / uu 


9 9P.Q oa 
Z , JOO . ZD 


Braasch, John & Nancy 


a i 7 nnn 
01 / , uuu 


A nAA An 

, U40 . OU 


Braden, John & Dianne 


a^9 Ann 

3Z , OUU 


, J7J . 'fo 


Bradford, Robert & Muriel 


9aa nnn 
zoo , uuu 


9 AnA An 

Z , OUO • OU 


DidUlcC) Dell Jdffll 11 OJ IldLLlld 


sqo son 


S 7ftQ P>4 

J, /07.04 


Bradlee III, Henry & Sandra 


A7Q Ann 

4 / 7 , OUU 


a 7n9 nA 

4 , / UZ .U4 


.oracney, tunora a jeannecce 


911 7nn 
Zl 1 , / uu 


9 n7A AA 
Z,U/ DO 


uraay, rvODeri. a nartna o 


9,99 ?nn 

J Z Z , iUU 


9 1 C7 CA 
-J , J > / i JU 


Brain, J. Walter & Patricia 


917 inn 

Zl/ , OUU 


9 19Q SA 


Brandt, John & Marilyn 


/. q n /. n n 
4?U , 4UU 


/. QA C QO 

4 , ou j . y z 


Brannen, Robert & Barbara 


£ O "7 O AA 

637 , oOO 


C OCA /. /. 

6 , Z 5 . 4 4 


Braude, Stephen 


tLO~7 1 A A 

68/ , 100 


6 , 733 .58 


Braun, Morton & Esther 


471,400 


4,619.72 


Bray, Thomas & Linda Micu 


O /T A O A A 

360, 200 


o C O A A ^ 

3 ,529 . 96 


Brennan, William & Eleanor 


OOO /. A A 

zyo, 400 


O O O /. 9 O 

z,yz4 . jz 


uriggs , uavia a tiaine 


^np. 7nn 
JUO , / uu 


A QP. 1 ^ 9 A 


Briggs, Randall & Mary 


4J4, oOO 


/■ 9 en no 
4 , z jy . uo 


Briggs, Ronald & Pauline 


O O C /. A A 

336,400 


O TQ£ "7 O 

j ,Z9o . / Z 


Bright, Richard & Patricia 


451,500 


/. AO A 7 n 
4 , 4Z4 . / U 


Brisson, Evelyn & Norman 


O C "7 O AA 

35/ , ZOO 


9 c.nn c.a 
J , 3UU . jo 


Brodenck, Ronald & Elizabeth 


o tnn 
J, oOO 


9 c. 9 Q 
jj.Zo 


Brodney, Lawrence & Myra 


CCA Q AA 

3 JO , OUU 


^ A^A AA 
D , 430 • Oh- 


Brogna, Gerald & Mary 


7m nnn 
/01, 000 


A QA Q Qn 

o , oo y. ou 


Bronson, Franklin & Catherine 


OTC OA A 

JZ_> , ZUU 


9 1 Q A QA 
J , lO O . ? O 


Brooks, Paul 


^^n Ann 

jjU , 4UU 


Q 9Q9 09 


RrnnV q RnHnpv & PViatiw^Hpp 


376,700 


3,691.66 


Brower Tr. , Howard 


681,900 


6,682.62 


Brown, Deaver 


673,900 


6,604.22 


Brown, Herbert & Theresa 


398,000 


3,900.40 


Brown, Jeffrey & Kathryn Corbin 


659,700 


6,465.06 


Brown, Robert G & Donna 


269,000 


2,636.20 


Brown, Robert & Jeane 


281,600 


2,759.68 


Brown, Robert W & Lee 


226,700 


2,221.66 


Brown, Stephen & Susan Garbose 


599,000 


5,870.20 


Browne, Giles & Lorraine 


471,600 


4,621.68 


Brubaker, W.L. & Lorraine 


311,000 


3,047.80 


Brumme, Peter & Marie 


555,200 


5,440.96 


Bucci, Frank & Arlene 


443,500 


4,346.30 


Buchan, Barbara 


304,600 


2,985.08 


Buckler, Marilyn 


410,400 


4,021.92 



207 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1988 



Aggregate Value 
Real Estate 



Buerger, Martin & Lila 
Buonopane, Paul & Mary 
Burckett, Douglas 
Burk, George & Ruth 
Burke, Ruth Bemis 
Burke, Thomas & Kathleen 
Burke Jr, Walter & Helen 
Burnes, Justin & Jeanne tte 
Burnham, Robert & Elaine 
Burt, William & Donna 
Butkus, E & Sweeney, M 
Butler, William & Nancy 
Buzney, Sheldon & Jane 
Bye, Willis & Angela 
Byrne, Brian & Julie 
Byrnes, Margaret 
Byron, Alan & Kathryn Waugh 



$ 505,900 
326,100 
432,000 
366,300 
565,000 
701,000 
352,600 
322,300 
329,300 
456,000 
390,900 
314,100 

1,074,900 
640,200 
474,900 
646,800 
240,600 



4,957.82 
3,195.78 
4,233.60 
3,589.74 
5,537.00 
6,869.80 
3,455.48 
3,158.54 
3,227.14 
4,468.80 
3,830.82 
3,078.18 
10,534.02 
6,273.96 
4,654.02 
6,338.64 
2,357.88 



Cabot, Mary D G 
Caldwell, Sarah 
Calitri, Leon & Mary 
Campobasso, Richard & Lou Ann 
Cancian, David & Mary 
Candlewood Trust 
Cannon, Bradford & Ellen 
Cannon, Robert & Betty 
Cantlin, Antoinette 
Cantlin, John & Antoinette 
Cantu, Robert 
Capizzi, Michael 
Cappucci, Thomas & Barbara 
Caras, Byron & Anastasia 
Caras, Ophair & Florence 
Carl Jr, Charles 
Carley, John & Joan 
Carlo, Peter & Cheryl 
Carman, John & Eleanor 
Carmen, William & Louise 
Carmody, Sean & Leie 
Carr, Frederick & Susan 
Carroll, Brenda/Hosey , John 
Carroll, Richard 
Carroll, Richard & Elaine 
Carter, John 
Carter, Lewis & Beverly 
Caruso, Robert & Abbie 
Carver, Jack & Donna 
Caskey, Anna 



537,900 
588,900 
267,000 
313,300 
444,100 
2,992,200 
327,300 
842,100 
440,000 
605,700 
655,100 
266,100 
369,100 
387,100 
292,700 
520,800 
450,800 
377,100 
696,900 
462,700 
276,300 
582,100 
209,000 
245,300 
231,300 
682,600 
702,600 
286,600 
269,700 
286,000 



5,271.42 
5,771.22 
2,616.60 
3,070.34 
4,352.18 
29,323.56 
3,207.54 
8,252.58 
4,312.00 
5,935.86 
6,419.98 
2,607.78 
3,617.18 
3,793.58 
2,868.46 
5,103.84 
4,417.84 
3,695.58 
6,829.62 
4,534.46 
2,707.74 
5,704.58 
2,048.20 
2,403.94 
2,266.74, 
6,689.48 
6,885.48 
2,808.68 
2,643.06 
2,802.80 



208 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1988 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 





Real Estate 


Tax 


Caskey, Walter 


$ 486,300 


$ 4,765.74 


Cassidy, Brian, Tr. 


193,100 


1,892.38 


Caswell, John & Carol 


509,600 


4,994.08 


Cavallaro, Peter & Elizabeth 


653,900 


6,408.22 


Cellucci, Daniel & Yolanda 


183,600 


1,799.28 


Cellucci, Elizabeth & Stephen 


358,600 


3,514.28 


Chaet, Robert & Joyce Williams 


248,900 


2,439.22 


Chaiken, Jan & Marcia 


427,800 


4,192.44 


Chalilpoyil, Purush & Kerstin Bauks 


300,600 


2,945.88 


Champeny, John/ Lisa 


/ a o r r\ t~\ 

403,600 


3, 955.28 


Champeny , Leona 


751,400 


7,363.72 


Champion, Craig & Teresa 


/too i a a 

622, 100 


6,096.58 


Chan, Catherine 


o o / i An 

384,100 


3, 764. lo 


Chan, Vincent & Agnes 


COO "7 a A 

523, 700 


5, 132 .26 


Chapin, Bertha 


842,800 


8,259.44 


Chapin, Margaret 


o -i o i a r\ 

318,100 


3,117.38 


Chase, Rebecca 


871 , yoo 


8,544.62 


Chen, Sow-Hsin & Ching-Chih 


99,100 


971.18 


Cherniack, Jerome & Elizabeth 


306,900 


3,007.62 


Chien, Kenneth & Patricia 


154,200 


1,511.16 


Chin, Joseph & Barbara 


262,200 


2,569.56 


Chiotelis, Charles & Iasme 


447,400 


4,384.52 


Chipman, Mary 


259,700 


2,545.06 


Chisholm, Edward & Margaret 


289,900 


2,841.02 


Chmielinski, Tsun Ming/Robert 


283,700 


2,780.26 


Chopra, Deepak & Rita 


758,600 


7,434.28 


Chou, Harry & Lily 


498,500 


4,885.30 


Christensen, David & Patsy 


396,600 


3,886.68 


Chris tensen, Ronald 


474,200 


4,647.16 


Chu, Chauncy & Margaret 


466,100 


4,567.78 


Chu, Ge Yao & Wei Ying 


544,700 


5,338.06 


Chu, Tomoko & Nelson 


396,800 


3,888.64 


Church, Robert & Priscilla 


501,400 


4,913.72 


Churchill, Richard & Maria 


1,163,400 


11,401.32 


Ciampa, V. /Sullivan, J. 


205,100 


2,009.98 


Ciampi, Mary 


O O A / A A 

330,400 


O O O ~7 AO 

3,237. 92 


Ciaramaglia, Frederick/Marcia 


476,200 


4,666.76 


Cibel, Stanley & Thelma 


284,000 


2,783.20 


Ciraso, Anne & Jennie & John 


419,500 


4,111.10 


Clark, Clifford & Patricia 


487,400 


4,776.52 


Clark, Sandra B 


415,800 


4,074.84 


Clarke, James 


299,600 


2,936.08 


Coan, Thomas & Catherine 


235,600 


2,308.88 


Coane, Amolia 


195,700 


1,917.86 


Coburn, Estate of Edward 


514,200 


5,039.16 


Coffin, Stewart & Jane 


427,300 


4,187.54 


Cohen, Jacques 


370,800 


3,633.84 


Cole, Addison & Ann B 


355,100 


3,479.98 


Cole, Edwin & Lucy 


457,200 


4,480.56 



209 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1988 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 

Real Estate Tax 



Cole, George & Barbara 


$ 528,100 


$ 5,175.38 


Cole, Hugh & Anne C 


739,900 


7,251.02 


Coleman, George & Kathleen 


426,000 


4,174.80 


Coleman, Mary M 


458,600 


4,494.28 


Coleman,. Susan 


1,500 


14.70 


Collins, Donald & Susan 


539, 100 


5,283. 18 


Collins, Laurence & Janet 


372,400 


3,649.52 


Com jean, Bruce & Marlies 


585,000 


5,733.00 


Com jean, Marc & Judith 


389,000 


3,812.20 


Como, Florence 


297,200 


2,912.56 


Comstock, Charles 


245,300 


2,403.94 


Comstock, Joan 


465,800 


4,564.84 


Cone Jr, Thomas & Barbara 


444,800 


4,359.04 


Connolly, Joseph 


367,600 


3,602.48 


Conrad, Peter & Ylisabyth 


435,500 


4,267.90 


Constable, William 


287,300 


2,815.54 


Constant ine, Katherine 


307,300 


3,011.54 


Cook, John & Caroline 


420,500 


4,120.90 


Cook, Jr, Paul & Marion 


558,600 


5,474.28 


Coolidge, Henry & Alice 


661,800 


6,485.64 


Coons, Nancy 


463,700 


4,544.26 


Cooper, E Crawley & Jane 


411,100 


4,028.78 


Cooper, Lorna 


479,200 


4,696.16 


Copeland, Charles & Muriel 


376,600 


r\ s r\r\ r o 

3, 690.68 


Corcoran, Robert & Elizabeth 


461,600 


4,523.68 


Cormack, Barbara 


161,600 


1,583.68 


Cotoia, Anthony & Lucy 


470,100 


4,606.98 


Cotoia, Lucy 


395,300 


3,873.94 


Cotoia, Anthony & Lucy, Trs. 


255,100 


2,499.98 


Cotoni, Arthur & Penelope 


360,400 


3,531.92 


Cotoni, Joseph 


304,800 


2,987.04 


Cotton, Michael & Diane 


743,100 


7,282.38 


Countryside Contemporaries 


388,600 


3,808.28 


Countryside Estates 


950,500 


r» oi /. on 

y,ji4. yu 


Courtney, Joseph & Elaine 


278,800 


2,732.24 


Cousins, Estate of Lawrence 


329,500 


3,229.10 


Cowles, Addison & Alexandra 


296,400 


2,904.72 


Craig, Robert & Amy 


276,100 


2,705.78 


Craig Jr, Stanley & Susan 


565,600 


5,542.88 


Crandall, Stephen & Patricia 


547,400 


5,364.52 


Crawford, Hugh 


241,200 


2,363.76 


Crawford , John & Joanna 


486,300 


4,765.74 


Creighton,Alexander/Elizabeth 


308,300 


3,021.34 


Cretella, Henry & Ruth 


611,300 


5,990.74 


Critch, William & Dorina L. 


568,900 


5,575.22 


Crook, Constance 


237,900 


2,331.42 


Crosby, Douglas & Laura 


599,100 


5,871.18 


Crosby, Gregory & Anne 


592,300 


5,804.54 


Crowe , Mary 


586,500 


5,747.70 



210 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1988 



Aggregate Value 
Real Estate 



Real Estate 
Tax 



$ 208,200 
809,000 
294,300 
356,900 
279,400 
263,400 
473,100 
328,400 
288,700 



$ 2,040.36 
7,928.20 
2,884.14 
3,497.62 
2,738.12 
2,581.32 
4,636.38 
3,218.32 
2,829.26 



CTT Associates 

Culver, Perry 

Curamings, William & Palma 

Cunningham, J Lewis & Ruth 

Cunningham, James 

Cunningham, Robert M. & Claire 

Cunningham, Robert A. & Margaret 

Curtis, Stanley & Cody 

Curtiss, Robert & Dorothy 



Dacosta, David & Dianna G 

Dallos, Andras & Zsuzsanna 

Damico, Ralph & Elvira 

Damico Jr, Ralph & Edwina 

Damon, J Gilbert & Priscilla 

Dane, Benjamin & Alexandra 

Dane, Roger & Lydia 

Daniels, Bruce & Janet 

Daniels, Grover & Starr 

Danna, Mario 

Danosky, Mary 

Darling Jr, Eugene 

Darling, Leonard & Barbara 

Darman, Richard 

Darrigo Brothers Co. 

Dautremont, Chester & Ruth 

Dautremont, Ruth 

Davis, Prescott 

Davis, R. May 

Davis, Ronald & Barbara 

Davis, Sherman 

Davis , Sherman & Phyllis 

Dawes, Donald & Ruth 

De La Pena, Miguel & Irma 

Dean, Louis 

Dean, Robert & Denise 

Dean, William & Lorraine 

Debaryshe, Paul & Louise 

Decisneros, Maria 

Deck, Mark & Patricia 

Deguglielmo, Florence 

Dejesus, John & Geneva 

Delia, John & Maria 

DellaCamera-MacClary, Debra 

DelliPriscoli, Jon M. Tr. 

Delori, Francois & Rosamond 

Denehy, Bernadetta 

Denehy, Edward 



943,300 
280,500 
858,000 
259,200 
334,600 
972,100 
1,075,100 
727,500 
560,500 
211,000 
242,500 
404,100 
621,300 
294,900 
178,600 
797,300 
440,000 
145,700 
284,300 
323,500 
608,400 
835,600 
392,700 
367,100 
5,900 
232,400 
325,400 
315,200 
310,600 
545,200 
1,500 
443,500 
444,300 
622,300 
373,400 
643,500 
607,900 
386,300 



211 



9,244.34 
2,748.90 
8,408.40 
2,540.16 
3,279.08 
9,526.58 
10,535.98 
7,129.50 
5,492.90 
2,067.80 
2,376.50 
3,960.18 
6,088.74 
2,890.02 
1,750.28 
7,813.54 
4,312.00 
1,427.86 
2,786.14 
3,170.30 
5,962.32 
8,188.88 
3,848.46 
3,597.58 
57.82 
,277.52 
188.92 
,088.96 
043.88 
,342.96 
14.70 
4,346.30 
4,345.14 
6,098.54 
3,659.32 
6,306.30 
5,957.42 
3,785.74 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1988 

Aggregate Value Real Estate 







D a o 1 Fcfafo 
iN-CdX do LdLc 


Ta v 


jJcIiX10J.ni, jLUdLL OC JdllC 




i 581 500 


$ 5,698.70 


i/ciiiouuj rid j- y 




545,100 


5,341.98 


rioMrvrmflnHi A1 1 f»P 




748,600 


7,336.28 


uexNoruiaiiaie , rnixxp/ ijrnesL.ine 




23,200 


227.36 


DeiNormanaie , KODerc ot iixxaria 




544 800 


5,339.04 


DeNormandie Farms Trust 




618 000 


6 056 40 


T"\o W/-\T~mo n H t o TTi r>ma c T^a t~Vi £»t* "f np 


VI rtoria 


1,241,400 


12,165.72 


TVl T" K\7cV» "1 T*C» Hal on 
L/CLUyaJ-lllCj X1CJ.CU 




1,500 


14.70 


Ti*»Qfl"f ^fimlT" & Ni 1 ima 

L/Coal , O CI 1 II 1 J- U HAA 1 IllrX 




773,900 


7,584.22 


DesCognets , Gwendolyn 




568 300 


5,569.34 


ueuerxing jr } rvaxpn cc ridiry 




436 500 


4,277.70 


Dewey , Edward & Zella 




419,400 


4 , 110 . 12 


Dewey, Edward S. & Laurie 




716 600 


7,022.68 


Dexter, Barbara 




524,700 


5,142.06 


Uia. U , uOQS LdllLc u XllUUldo 




850,900 


8,338.82 


JJiaQlUK., VlCKy 




325,600 


3,190.88 


Diarbakerly , Mark & Regina 




?69 200 


2 638.16 


uiCKie, tvicnara a juxxa 




287 100 

£m\J / ) _L_ \J\J 


2,813.58 


DieuDon, tvODerc oc ixxm 




252,500 


2,474.50 


jjiecencn, rvicnarci cc ueveriy 




404 600 


3,965.08 


Digiovanni, Guy & Teresa 




^90 ^00 


3,824.94 


uiig, ones 




3?6 900 


3 203 62 


Dillman, Douglas & Virginia 




071 ooo 

£. 1 X j iUU 


2,657.76 


Diners tein, Gordon 




T59 500 


3 523.10 


Ditoro, nxcnaex 




221,900 


2,174.62 


uixuii, riiiuutu 




130,300 


1,276.94 


Dixon, Russell & Theresa 




334 500 


3,278.10 


Doherty , James & Ellen 




298 800 


2,928.24 


Uonerty, William a rnyins 




603 200 


5,911.36 


Doherty 1 s Garage 




530 400 


5,197.92 


Dolan, Charles & Joanne 




910,100 


8,918.98 


Dolinsky, Larry & Joan 




ooi qnn 


2,174.62 


Domenichella, Domenic 




1 R9 700 


1,496.46 


Domenichella, Frank/Margaret 




97ft 1 00 


2 725.38 


Domenichella Jr, Frank 




62,500 


'612.50 


Donald, Aida 




544,100 


5,332.18 


Donald, David & Aida 




257,600 


2,524.48 


Donaldson, Alan 




294,200 


2,883.16 


Donaldson, Astrid 




399,600 


3,916.08 


Donaldson, David & Lynn 




976,900 


9,573.62 


Donaldson, Donald 




1,300 


12.74 


Donaldson, Elizabeth 




919,000 


9,006.20 
6,844.32 


Donaldson, Jonathan & Nancy 




698,400 


Donaldson, Magruder/ Jennifer 




669,600 


6,562.08 


Donaldson, Malcolm 




849,900 
445,700 


8,329.02 


Donnell, Marion 




4,367.86 


Donovan, Andrew 




512,300 


5,020.54 


Donovan, Donna 




331,700 


3,250.66 


Dooley, Thomas & Helen 


212 


776,100 


7,605.78 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1988 





Aggregate 


Value 


Real 


Estate 




Real Estate 




Tax 


Dorian, Paul & Susan 


$ 410, 


700 


* 4, 


024.86 


Dougherty, Allen & Helen 


228, 


800 


2, 


242.24 


Doughty, Joseph 


239, 


200 


2, 


344.16 


Downey Jr, Edward /Elizabeth 


296, 


400 


2, 


904.72 


Downing, Daniel & Linda L 


309, 


900 


3, 


037.02 


Downs, Elaine 


419, 


500 


4, 


111.10 


Dowse, Amy 


493, 


600 


4, 


837.28 


Drago, Nicholas & Sara 


462, 


900 


4, 


536.42 


Drane , Douglas 


892, 


,600 


8, 


747.48 


Drew, Frederic & Shirley 


209, 


900 


2, 


057.02 


Driscoll, Daniel & Constance 


547 3 


,500 


5, 


365.50 


Duane, Neil & Floretta 


363, 


400 


3, 


561.32 


Dubin, Steven 


362, 


,700 


3, 


554.46 


Dubois, Olive 


254, 


,400 


2, 


493.12 


Duborg, George 


437, 


,800 


4, 


290.44 


Duffy III, James & Barbara 


813, 


,200 


7, 


969.36 


Durso, Muriel 


261, 


,600 


2, 


,563.68 


Dust in, Rachel 


353. 


,900 


3, 


468.22 


Dyer- Alexander, Cheryl 


651 ; 


,100 


6, 


,380.78 


Eaton, Jefferson 


265, 


,400 


2, 


600.92 


Eckhardt, Homer 


358 


,300 


3.. 


,511.34 


Edlund, Campbell 


340, 


,100 


3, 


332.98 


Egendorf, Andrew & Linda 


930 


,000 


9, 


,114.00 


Elkus, Howard & Lorna 


484 ; 


,200 


4, 


745.16 


Elliott, Peggy 


607 


,500 


5. 


,953.50 


Ellis, Eloise 


629, 


,100 


6, 


,165.18 


Ellis Jr, Alexander & Nancy 


829 


,300 


8, 


,127.14 


Ellison, George & Clare 


794, 


,200 


7, 


,783.16 


Ells, Stephen 


172 


,100 


1, 


,686.58 


El wood, David & Carol 


272 


,200 


2, 


,667.56 


Emerson, William & Pamela 


452 


,500 


4. 


,434.50 


Emery, Alice 


401 


,600 


3, 


,935.68 


Emmons, Judith 


502 


,200 


4, 


,921.56 


England, Albert & Priscilla 


612 


,100 


5, 


,998.58 


Eppling, Frederic & Sarah 


297 


,500 


2. 


,915.50 


Epstein, Arnold & Patricia OMalley 


517 


,300 


5 ; 


,069.54 


Ericson, Herbert & Erlyne 


392 


,400 


3 


,845.52 


Eschenroeder, Alan & Laura 


538 


,500 


5 ; 


,277.30 


Eshleman, Dean 


220 


,800 


2 


,163.84 


Etcheverry, Nicholas 


547 


,600 


5, 


,366.48 


Evangelista, Florenzo/Dorothy 


235 


,000 


2 


,303.00 


Evans, Lucius & Cynthia 


860 


,500 


8 


,432.90 


Faddoul, George & Natalie 


307 


,000 


3 


,008.60 


Fairbanks, Alan & Diane 


1 


,500 




14.70 


Falender, Andrew 213 


417 


,200 


4 


,088.56 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1988 







Aggregate Value 


Real Estate 






Real Estate 


Tax 


Faneuil Hall Flower Mkt. 




$ 424,000 


$ 4,155.20 


Far an, James 




538,700 


5,279.26 


Fargo, Susan & Foster 




550,200 


5,391.96 


Farny, Michael 




395,500 


3,875.90 


Farny, Michael & Ethel 




306,500 


3,003.70 


Farrell Philip & Ruth 




355,600 


3,484.88 


Farrokh-Pars , Homayoon & Fatemeh 




289,200 


2,834.16 


Feinberg, Neil 




368,300 


3,609.34 


Fol rlman Dp> V>n T*a V) 
x cxixlilclil, ucuuLaii 




387,000 


3,792.60 


Felegian, Peter & Marion 




349,700 


3,427.06 


Fol l y Tampc 




318,600 


3,122.28 


Fenijn, Chris & Yvonne 




361,600 


3,543.68 


Fenton, Terence & Cynthia 




210,500 


2,062.90 


Fernald Jr, George & Eleanor 




747,800 


7,328.44 


Porn' VAua rr\ & F1 Pflnnt" 




354,000 


3,469.20 


Ferro, Armand & Jacqueline 




282,000 


2,763.60 






251,100 


2,460.78 


Fmnegan, Lawrence 




174,500 


1,710.10 


Ui nr\nTr^7 TamfiC X, Anna 

rinnercy, James ot Annd. 




297,000 


2,910.60 


r xiiiic x. l y , ixicudiu ot wcimy 




467,500 


4,581.50 


Finney, Ross & Laura 




1 013 200 


9,929.36 


Fi nnpan a Ann 




631,700 


6,190.66 


rlSCalc j JOSepu, JLX. 




369,300 


3,619.14 


Fisher, John 




414 ,200 


4,059.16 


ricts vioacw, ijercruue 




609,700 


5,975.06 


IT A r»ara1 A TV»rDl/ ^, VI oonnr 

r i u^gcxaxu. , ucicK. o( Ij-l cdnij l 




318,500 


3,121.30 


r l czgeraxu , jorui ot j.uexinci 




337,700 


3,309.46 


r J. L^gcl dXU , 1 IX v-IlclC-L/ Iv Cl LLl-LCCil 




1,237,200 


12,124.56 


r laiUlc ivy , VjUIioLclIH-fc: 




445,700 


4,367.86 


r XcHirici. y , uoiidiu ji ot iullic 




332,400 


3,257.52 
5,064.64 


F1 anQVniToh Rati & Louise 




516,800 


Flint , Edward & Henry 




337,300 


3,305.54 


pi in)- FHuarH r/n Hptitv 




6,300 


61.74 


FT inf Fnhraim 

X J L Li U , JJU11L CX-I.U1 




15,100 


147.98 


rxinu, iiugenia 




316,200 


3,098.76 


Flint, George & Lucie 








Flint, Jonathan & Alice 




437,600 


4,28o .4o 


Flint, Margaret S. 




366,500 


3,591.70 


Flint, Peter & Janet 




311,600 


3,053.68 


Flint, Warren & Margaret S 




3,100 


30.38 


Flint, Warren F. 




3,500 


34.30 


Flint Jr., Warren & Margaret 




540,600 


5,297.88 


Flint Realty Trust 




206,700 


2,025.66 


Flynn, William & Therese 




348,800 


3,418.24 


Foley, John 




283,100 


2,774.38 


Ford II, David & Mary 




700,700 


6,866.86 


Fortunato, Frank & Joan 




229,900 


2,253.02 


Foster, Gerald & Candace 




375,000 


3,675.00 


Foster, J Edward & Sara 


214 


410,200 


• 4,019.96 









VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1988 





Aoorpoa fo Va1 hp 
acdl xjbLdLc 


XVCCtX L5 Ld Lc 

laX 


Francis, Henry & Phoebe 


<t t^i inn 

J J j1 , xUU 


4 *i OA A 7 Q 


Frank, Robert & Velma 


637,800 


6,250.44 


Fraser, Donald & Joanne 


c oi 1 An 
J Jl , 1UU 


c on/. "7 Q 
J , IVH . /O 


Fraser, Robert & Donna 


OAA QAA 

juu , yuu 


O Q /. O O O 


Frazier, Michael & Janet 


9ift nnn 
ZXO , uuu 


9 lit An 


Freda, Warren & Priscilla 


on ^nn 

ZU , 3UU 


onn Qn 
ZUU . y U 


Freed, Charles & Florence 


L«r\ inn 


a ^n« qr 


French, John & Deborah 


(LC.C. nnn 

ODD , UUU 


a ^ o a on 

, jZD . oU 


Friedman, Eleanor/ Cohen, Jonathan 


rqq nnn 
O? 7 , uuu 


r sin 9n 

o , o±U • i. u 


Frncf RflTnpr & Mart Via 

X i. W O l_ 5 LVd _1_ UC i. Ut I 1CX i- L. 1 la 


412 000 


4 037 fiO 


nuoLj ncoicy ot uLiuuei 


?qq finn 

t-J J y UUU 


9 91fi 08 


Funaro , Enrico & Catherin 


^Qi ^nn 

, JUL) 


^ 7QA 7n 


Fiicllln Cc\r\n&tta 

rUblllU, L>UUL.eLLcl 


555,500 


5,443.90 




338 500 


3,317.30 


uclUUVlLLIl) rxIlIlcLLc 


379,400 


3,718.12 


vrctxxey, ixmuniy u iidi.y 


373,700 


3 662 26 


IJaX -L X LdllU , iicU Of riX LUlUlloc 


475,500 


4,659.90 


Gannett, Ann 


705,100 


6,909.98 


P o rr\ on t - Tr Paul K, Harriot - 


296 400 

t.7U j ^tkJKJ 


2,904.72 


Gargill, Lynn 


290,600 


2,847.88 


VJCl X. g X X X , 1\.UUC1 L 


1 139 100 


11,163.18 


(jaxinoL y , Dex L lid. 


99 s ion 

£.4. J y XUU 


2 205.98 


riarnor RnKprf ft ffsfhl ppn 

vJO. X. 11C X, , i\U UC i. l_ 1VQ LU1CC11 


285,800 


2 , ,800.84 


Garrpff Pri chard & Trapv 


527, 100 


5,165.58 


Cam' crtn Tla vTH & A1 ino 
v7dX L X 5UU , xyclVXLl OC A1J.LC 


381 300 


3,736.74 


fiarri erin Tr»Vin 

VJCl X. X J_ OV/11 , O Ullll 


563 600 


5,523.28 


udxolUc j rvXXL.tr 


262 300 


2,570.54 


vjcixLii, ju nil <x iNancy 


qi 9 inn 

Jit , XUU 


3 058 58 


Gary, Maida 


339 200 


3,324.16 


tjaLcnexx jr , Lt vjoruon/ ils cner 


98A "300 

iOlj J uu 


9 786 14 


Gauvin, Gregory & Mary 


^a Ann 
Jjt , *+uu 


Q 077 19 


Gavrin, Edward 


l«r Ann 
to J , tuu 


a sfin 99 

t , JUU . -7 ^ 


Gechijian, Ara & Nancy 


s Ann 


S9 99 


Gechter, Jerry & Anne 


180,700 


1 7 7n 
1, //U.00 


Geer, Charles 


902,300 


8,842 .54 


Gentile, Joseph & Kathleen 


242,800 


2,379.44 


Gerson, Nathaniel & Sareen 


383,400 


3,757.32 


Gertz, Dwight & Virginia 


413,300 


4,050.34 


Gervais, Maurice & Francoise 


285,100 


2,793.98 


Gheith, Dorothy 


256,000 


2,508.80 


Giese, Paul & Lucretia 


367,600 


3,602.48 


Gilfoy, Donald & Helen 


384,300 


3,766.14 


Gillis, John & Marsha 


551,500 


5,404.70 


Giurleo, James & Mary 


34,000 


333.20 


Glass, John & Florence 


336,900 


3,301.62 


Gleason, Nancy 


492,600 


4,827.48 


Glendon, Richard & Diana 


271,400 


2,659.72 


215 





VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1988 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 





Real Estate 


lax 


CjOdaara, Kicriara & Karen 


6> o c o 

$ 253, 


3UU 


4 9 Aft 9 9A 
$ Z,hoZ.-jh 


LrOlabaum, Micnael & Wanda 


hoI, 


oUU 


/■ ^9 A/ 
4, jZj. Oh 


Golden, Sylvia 


/■ i o 
hIU , 


700 
/ uu 


A 09/i ft A 
H , UZh . OO 


*jomiubL j jerry 


9 A9 
ZhZ, 


9 AO 

z uu 


9 373 S6 


ooiastein, Joei 


999 
zz? , 




2,253.02 


Goodrich, John & Susan 


A7ft 


soo 

J uu 


4 689 30 


uOOQo pticU , >Ja.l_v| Lie -Lille 


307, 


800 


3,016.44 


rirk"r*rlrkr» A1 1 on /Pi 1 m nri Torn' 
WLUUll j rY_L_Lell/ <ja_L111cIL1 , Icill 


288, 


600 


2 828 28 

j Ui.U • Z. ^ 


rirvT*n* nn Or»T*"l c 
uOIUUH) 1/U.L-Lo 


ftftfi 

UOO . 


fi00 

i uuu 


6,728.68 


(~* r\ ~y* r\ /~\ r"t Toot"oT* X, Fla fna 
vjO.lU.UII, IjcoLcI Ot UcLXlld. 


366 


700 


3 593 66 


uraDiii, narcna 


317 


,800 


3,114.44 


GrpHrliQ R-f gharri 




200 


80.36 


Graf , Jeannette 


252 3 


,800 


2,477.44 


vjL cXlldJDj JdLK. Ot lNOLUld. 


586, 


800 


5,750.64 


Grande, Orlando & Rose 


Aft S 


700 


4,759.86 


CZt~a<2 Do nn 1 "F X# Annoht*o 
Vji do ) .r\ia HQ i- .L GC t\ll lltr L U t: 


191 


9 00 

, £. UU 


3, > 833.76 


orason, Jc,ana 


171 


ooo 
, uuu 


3 655 40 


Gray, George & Ellen 


SA9 
JhZ, 


9 00 

i z uu 


5 313.56 


Gray, Leslie & Jessie 


AQ9 
H7Z | 


AOO 
, OUU 


4,827.48 


Gray, Patricia & Stephen 


001 1 


1 oo 

, 1UU 


ft A7ft 7ft 

0,H/0./0 


Greaves, Allan & Theresa 


ZOO 


70A 
, /UU 


9 ft09 fifi 

£. , OU 7 . uu 


Greeley, James & Bernice 


971 


ftOO 
, OUU 


9 AA1 fiA 

J , OHJ . UH 


Green, Laurence & Margot 


9A A 

OHH 


700 
, /UU 


9 178 Ofi 


Green, Robert T. & Catherine 


A^Q 

Oj y , 


100 
, OUU 


U , HUJL . 14 


Green, Robert V. & Therese 


970 
Z / U 


QOO 

, 7UU 


2 654 82 


Greenberg, David 


9A1 

zol 


, jUU 


9 S69 70 


Greenberg, Sandra 


9^1 
JJJ 


700 

, / uu 


1 Afin 9n 
-J , HOD . Z O 


Greenberger, Joel & Catherine 


70Q 

/ zy 


lOO 

, ouu 


7 1 A7 i A 

/ , XH / . J-H 


Greeson, Joseph & Jennie 


690 


inn 

, 200 


A 7A1 9fi 
D , /DJi >u 


Griggs, Annette & Thomas 


/,OQ 

HOO 


ion 
, JUU 


A 7ft^ 1A 

H, /OJ.JH 


Grim Jr., William & Barbara 


10^ 


QOO 

, ?UU 


2 ,997 .82 


brinneii, Virginia 


375 


,800 


1 682 84 


Grinnen, Lewis 


638 


,900 


6,261.22 


Gross, Thomas & Judith 


354 


,500 


3,474.10 


Grover C. Stuart & Gunilda 


388 


,300 


3,805.34 


Groves, Allan & Camille 


349 


,300 


3,423.14 


Guarino, Guy & Frances 


598 


,400 


5,864.32 


Gudzinowicz, Mary & John 


303 


,500 


2,974.30 


Guiness, Laurence & Lois 


576 


,400 


5,648.72 


Guldberg, Peter & Alexandra 


684 


,800 


6,711.04 


Gummere, John/Hersey, Richard 


383 


,000 


3,753.40 


Gundy, William & Malora 


679 


,500 


6,659.10 


Gustafson, J Kenneth & Janet 


313 


,600 


3,073.28 


Gustavson, Glenn & Patricia M 


427 


,300 


4,187.54 


Guthke, Karl & Dagraar 


411 


,100 


4,028.78 


Guy, Cynthia 


499 


,400 


4,894.12 


Gyftopoulos, Elias & Artemis 


831 


,400 


8,147.72 



216 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1988 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 







Real Estate 


Tax 


H. B. Knowles, Inc. 




$ 694,000 


$ 6,801.20 


Haartz, Beatrice 




470,800 


4,613.84 


Haber, Stuart & Ellen 




478,100 


4,685.38 


Hachikian, Kenneth & Gloria 




575,500 


5,639.90 


Hadley, Henry & Janna 




519,900 


5,095.02 


Hadlock, Charles & Joanne 




509,600 


4,994.08 


Haessler, Diane 




525,000 


5,145.00 


Haggerty, John & Mary Jo 




498,800 


4,888.24 


Haggerty, Nancy 




247,400 


2,424.52 


Hagmann, Otto & Katherine 




506,600 


4,964.68 


Hales, Charles & Mary Ann 




576,700 


5,651.66 


Hall III, Andrew 




541,300 


5,304.74 


Halpern, Nicholas & Betsey 




464,000 


4,547.20 


Hamilton, William H & Esther 




411,200 


4,029.76 


Hamilton, William L & Barbara 




360,900 


3,536.82 


Hammond III, John & Nancy 




603,400 


5,913.32 


Hanania, Barbara 




229,700 


2,251.06 


Hansen, C Russel & Pamela 




900,400 


8,823.92 


Hansen, Kent 




723,600 


7,091.28 


Hanson, A.dler & Madeline 




371,000 


3,635.80 


Hapgood Jr, Norman & Ruth 




500,400 


4,903.92 


Harding, Douglas St Susan 




375,800 


3,682.84 


Harding, Sheila 




172,200 


1,687.56 


Harney, Gregory & Anne 




558,900 


5,477.22 


Haroian, Henry & Jessie 




332,000 


3,253.60 


Haroutunian, Harry & Anita 




184,500 


1,808.10 


Harrington, Andrea/Tanden, Prem 




100.200 


981.96 


Harrington, Nancy Forg 




16,200 


158.76 


Harrington, Winthrop 




29,700 


291.06 


Harrington, Winthrop/Tanden, Tej 




281,400 


2,757.72 


Harrington Jr., Clifford 




40,900 


400.82 


Harrington Jr., Winthrop & Andrea 




1,088,200 


10,664.36 


Harris, Eric 




457,600 


4,484.48 


Harris, Melvyn & Nancy 




495,800 


4,858.84 


Harris, Roger & Evelyn 




111 ,000 


O 7 O A /i Q 


Harrison, Eliza/Phillips, D. 




428,600 


4,200.28 


Harrison, Henry & Elizabeth 




988,800 


9,690.24 


Harvey, Frank & Adele 




611,100 


5,988.78 


Hatsopoulos, George & Daphne 




928,100 


9,095.38 


Hatsopoulos, John & Patricia 




853,300 


8,362.34 


Haughey McCann, Sylvia 




458,100 


4,489.38 


Hawes, Donald & Lillian 




391,100 


3,832.78 


Hawkes, Gregory & Elaine 




668,000 


6,546.40 


Hay, Pamela & Richard 




496,200 


4,862.76 


Haydock, Gale/Freeman, Mason 




471,400 


4,619.72 


Hayes, Oliver & Paula 




295,500 


2,895.90 


Hayes, Wilson & Dana Weigert 




453,800 


4,447.24 


Hays, Timothy & Pamela 




395,100 


3,871.98 


Healey Jr, Harry & Jeanne 


217 


438,100 


4,293.38 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, .1988 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 





Real Estate 


Tax 


Healthcare Property Investor 


$ 1,500 


$ 14.70 


Healy, Edward & Helen 


370,500 


3,630.90 


Heart , Frank & Jane 


390,900 


3,830.82 


Hecht , Norman & Mary 


415,300 


4,069.94 


Heck, Stanley & Mary 


1,117,200 


10,948.56 


Heghinian, Aram Tr. 


340,300 


3,334.94 


Heijn Jr, Cornelius & Marion 


284,000 


2,783.20 


Heinrich, Paul 


354,500 


3,474.10 
3,690.68 


Hellmuth, Joseph & Regina 


376,600 


Henderson, Robert 


16,100 


157.78 


Henderson, Robert & Carolyn 


343,300 


3,364.34 


Henderson, Ronald & Priscilla 


383,400 


3,757.32 


Hendrick, James & Kathleen 


345,200 


3,382.96 


Hendricks on, Robert & Ruth 


253,300 


2,482.34 


Hensley, Kevin & Melissa 


221,300 


2,168.74 


Herlacher, Larry & Jane 


629,400 


6,168.12 


Herlin, Melvin & Eugenia 


446,900 


4,379.62 


Herman, Peter & Mary 


221,100 


2,166.78 


Herrmann, Carl 


120,900 


1,184.82 


Herron, Robert & Dinny 


508,800 


4,986.24 


Hersch, Charles & Phyllis 


359,800 


3,526.04 


Herschbach, Dudley & Georgene 


403,200 


3,951.36 


Herthel, Evelyn 


574,600 


5,631.08 


Hester, Leon 


451,100 


4,420.78 


Hewitt, Elizabeth & George 


443,800 


4,349.24 


ni u ucii , vjtr i- ^ c 


587,400 


5,756.52 


Hipife Robert" & ^arflh 


207,500 


2,033.50 


Hieronymus, William & Ramelle 


531,900 


5,212.62 


Hi 1 1 Crai 9 & Heather 


548,200 


5,372.36 


Hill, John Tr. 


180,700 


1,770.86 


Hinds, Edward & Edith 


737,500 


7,227.50 


Hingston, Joseph & Gloria 


263,300 


2,580.34 


Hoar, Norman & Shirley 


362,700 


3,554.46 


Hoben, Allan & Susan 


334,700 


3,280.06 


Hoch, Alfred 


234,800 


2,301.04 


Hoch, Reimar 


244,600 


2,397.08 


Hodgson, Nicholas & Melissa 


811,700 


7,954.66 


Hoff, Charles & Josephine 


643,400 


6,305.32 


Holberton, Philip & Anne 


557,200 


5,460.56 


Holden, Sarah 


994,200 


9,743.16 
2,110.92 


Holden, Sarah & Lawrence 


215,400 


Holland, Peter & Marjorie 


316,100 


3,097.78 


Holland, Taffy 


482,400 


4,727.52 


Hollingsworth, Florence 


544,100 


5,332.18 


Hollister, Walter & Sally 


387,700 


3,799.46 


Hoover, Henry & Lucretia 


429,300 


4,207.14 


Hopengarten, Fredric & Betty 


361,000 


3,537.80 


Hopkins, Mark & Margaret Y. 


443,800 


4,349.24 


Hopkins, Robert & Mary 


380,000 


3,724.00 



218 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1988 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 





Real Estate 


Tax 


Home, Benjamin & Jean 


$ 519,500 


$ 5,091.10 


Horwitz, Murray & Patricia 


446,300 


4,373.74 


Houghton, Lillian 


139,300 


1,365.14 


Housman, Frank & Ruth 


661,700 


6,484.66 


Houtzeel, Stephanie 


308,600 


3,024.28 


Howard, Joseph & Sally 


500,800 


4,907.84 


Hsu, Cheng-Pei & Maggie 


269,300 


2,639.14 


Hsu, Michael & Dora 


626,700 


6,141.66 


Huang, Tai-San & Fu-Mei 


435,700 


4,269.86 


Hubbard, Eliot 


571,800 


5,603.64 


Hull, Kenneth & Sandra Winchester 


289,600 


2,838.08 


Humez, Alice D. 


935,100 


9,163.98 


Hunsaker Land Corp. Inc 


28,500 


279.30 


Hunsaker, Jerome 


834,700 


8,180.06 


Hunt , Daniel & Joan 


914,400 


8,961.12 


Hunter, William, Tr. 


571,900 


5,604.62 


Hunter, William & Suzanne 


358,500 


3,513.30 


Hurd, Kenneth E. 


587,900 


5,761.42 


Hurff, Joseph & Elizabeth 


359,100 


3,519.18 


Hyde, Benjamin & Mildred 


462,500 


4,532.50 


Hyraan, William & Aida F. 


326,800 


3,202.64 


Ide, Kenton & Chris tel 


327,100 


3,205.58 


Iliescu, Nicholae & Esther 


396,100 


3,881.78 


Immel, Stephen & Peggy 


412,800 


4,045.44 


Ingard, Sven Erik 


455,100 


4,459.98 


Inglis, John & Elizabeth 


569,200 


5,578.16 


Ireland, David & Diana 


619,600 


6,072.08 


Irwin, Mary 


603,300 


5,912.34 


Ives, Katherine C. 


614,000 


6,017.20 


Ivy Realty Trust 


1,221,200 


11,967.76 


J & M Realty Trust 


533,000 


5,223.40 


Jackson, Gardner & Sallie 


364,100 


3,568.18 


Jackson, Huson & Polly 


616,200 


6,038.76 


Jacobs, David & Louise 


485,600 


4,758.88 


Jacobson, John & Marion 


696,300 


6,823.74 


James, Hamilton & Waleska 


653,100 


6,400.38 


Janes, G. Sargent & Ann 


371,200 


3,637.76 


Jarvis, John & Elaine 


532,900 


5,222.42 


Jenal, Robert & Irene 


586,400 


5,746.72 


Jerodel Realty Trust 


1,021,100 


10,006.78 


Jevon, Robert & Virginia 


392,700 


3,848.46 


Jewett, Eleanor 


567,900 


5,565.42 


Jewett, Julie D 


522,800 


5,123.44 


Joannopoulos, John & Sandra 


617,300 


6,049.54 


John, DeWitt & Morley 


598,300 


5,863.34 



219 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1988 



Aggregate Value 
Real Estate 



Real Estate 
Tax 



Johnson, Ernest 
Johnson, Ernest & Grace 
Johnson, H.W. & Jeannine 
Johnson, Kenneth & Gladys 
Johnson, Kimmond & Anne 
Johnson, Richard & Donna 
Johnson, Rollin & Hilary 
Johnston, Carolyn 
Joshuas Way Realty Trust 
Juliano, Paul 



$ 273,100 
447,300 
589,800 
394,600 
485,900 
979,900 
344,600 
320,000 
873,700 
117,900 



2,676.38 
4,383.54 
5,780.04 
3,867.08 
4,761.82 
9,603.02 
3,377.08 
3,136.00 
8,562.26 
1,155.42 



Kahn, Martin & Susan 
Kalaidjian, W G & Wray, E. 
Kalajian, Michael & Seta 
Kalba, Konrad & Patricia 
Kameny, Stuart & Wendy 
Kanarek, Stephen & Roberta 
Kano, Cyrus & Dorothy 
Kao, Peter & Mei-Lin 
Karassik, Peter & Nancy 
Karp, Lori & Ethel 
Kasperian, Karl & Carol 
Kass, Edward & Amalie 
Kassner, Michael 
Katz, Saul & Dorothy 
Kaufman, Marcia 
Kaye, Harold & Alice 
Keay, Donald & Mary Ann 
Keevil, Charles & Hannah 

Keily, Gertrude 

Kelleher, Robert & Katherine 

Keller, John & Lanna 

Kelley, Andrew & Irene 

Kellner-Rogers, Joan 

Kelly, Thomas & Mary 

Kendrick, Marvin & Kathleen 

Kennard, Henrietta 

Kennedy, Albert & Carolyn 

Kennedy, Albert E. 

Kennedy, John P & Sylvia 

Kennedy, John T. 

Kennedy Land Corp. 

Kern, Edward & Priscilla 

Kerrebrock, Jack & Bernice 

Kessel, Joseph & Lesley 

Ketteringham, John & Susan 

Keyes, Janet 

Kimball, Joan & John 



508,300 
355,300 
510,000 
421,900 
527,100 
328,400 
347,500 
595,600 

45,600 
221,300 
665,400 
977,700 
353,800 
379,400 
421,900 
310,000 
391,600 
459,600 
248,800 
438,800 
196,400 
382,500 
248,600 
388,600 
1,500 
460,000 
355,300 

18,000 
512,900 
562,500 

47,100 
449,800 
480,400 
355,300 
362,400 
301,800 
385,700 



4,981.34 
3,481.94 
4,998.00 
4,134.62 
5,165.58 
3,218.32 
3,405.50 
5,836.88 

446.88 
2,168.74 
6,520.92 
9,581.46 
3,467.24 
3,718.12 
4,134.62 
3,038.00 
3,837.68 
4,504.08 
2,438.24 
4,300.24 
1,924.72 
3,748.50 
2,436.28 
3,808.28 
14.70 
4,508.00 
3,481.94 

176.40 
5,026.42 
5,512.50 

461.58 
4,408.04 
4,707.92 
3,481.94 
3,551.52 
2,957.64 
3,779.86 



220 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1988 



Aggregate Value 
Real Estate 



Real Estate 
Tax 



Kimnach, Elizabeth 
Kindleberger , Charles & Sarah 
King, Eleanor 
King, Pay-Shin & Tong-I 
King, William & Elizabeth 
Kingsbury, Howard & Ellen 
Kirkpatrick, Margaret 
Kistiakowsky , Irma 
Kitses, Steven & Mary 
Kjellander, Mary 
Klem, Christopher & Susan 
Kling, John & Louise 
Klobuchar, John & N Maribeth 
Kn owl ton, Anne 
Knox, Wendell & Lucile 
Ko, Nai Nan & Julia 
Koallick, Stephen/Keagy , Elsa 
Koehler, Edward & Margaret 
Kolbin, Lawrence & Rebecca 
Kolligian, Zoe 

Konstandakis, Nicholas & Mary 
Korhonen, Miriam 
Kornfeld, George & Hulen 
Koslowski, T. & Revell, P. 
Koumantzelis , Arthur & Vaia 
Koupas, William & Jeanne 
Kreidler, Anne 
Kroin, Lawrence 
Kruse, Katrina, Janet, Susan 
Kubik, James & Elizabeth 
Kuhns, Roger & Roberta 
Kuhns-Dimanescu, Katherine 
Kulka, J Peter 
Kumar, Suparna 
Kumler, Kipton & Katherine 
Kurtz, Arthur 

Kurzina, Peter & Stephanie 
Kusik, Charles & Wendy Palu 
Kwasniak, Walter 



299,100 
371,300 
370,800 
340,200 
318,100 
315,600 
450,400 
552,600 
446,200 
355,600 
392,200 
286,200 
313,900 
588,500 
460,200 
812,800 
221,300 
323,800 
437,900 
710,600 
329,600 
289,900 
270,700 
236,100 
595,700 
600,400 
230,800 
400,700 
294,400 
438,200 
557,200 
596,400 
228,400 
454,900 
706,700 
364,600 
335,400 
344,100 
263,300 



2,931.18 
3,638.74 
3,633.84 
3,333.96 
3,117.38 
3.092.88 
4,413.92 
5,415.48 
4,372.76 
3,484.88 
3,843.56 
2,804.76 
3,076.22 
5,757.30 
4,509.96 
7,965.44 
2,168.74 
3,173.24 
4,291.42 
6,963.88 
3,230.08 
2,841.02 
2,652.86 
2,313.78 
5,837.86 
5,883.92 
2,261.84 
3,926.86 
2,885.12 
4,294.36 
5,460.56 
5,844.72 
2,238.32 
4,458.02 
6,925.66 
3,573.08 
3,286.92 
3,372.18 
2,570.54 



Lackner-Graybiel, James & Ann 
Ladjevardi, Habib & Golnaz 
Lahnstein, Richard 
Landry, Christopher & G Barrie 
Lane, J Frank & Kathleen 
Lang, Richard & Betty 
Langton, William & Jane 
Lankhorst, Beverly 



221 



474,500 
859,600 
220,900 
805,900 
570,100 
497,700 
531,800 
320,800 



4,650.10 
8,424.08 
2,164.82 
7,897.82 
5,586.98 
4,877.46 
5,211.64 
3,143.84 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1988 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 





Real Estate 


Tax 


Lathrop, Scott & Beatrice 


$ 414,500 


$ 4,062.10 


Lauterbach, Peter & Barbara 


389,800 


3,820.04 


Lavrakas, Apostle & Fofo 


130,500 


1,278.90 


Lawson, John 


128,400 


1,258.32 


Lay, Kenneth & Virginia 


544,800 


5,339.04 


Lazaridis, Lazarus & Suzanne 


417,700 


4,093.46 


Leaning, Jennifer & Barron, Ruth 


474,800 


4,653.04 


Leape, Martha 


447,100 


4,381.58 


Lee, Alan & Deborah Peebles 


449,700 


4,407.06 


Lee, David 


224,100 


2,196.18 


Lee, Kenneth & Marcia 


464,600 


4,553.08 


Lee, Richard & Josephine Gump 


626,000 


6,134.80 


Lee, Shih Ying & Lena 


550,500 


5,394.90 


Lee, Thomas & Barbara 


535,000 


5,243.00 


Legates, John 


609,400 


5,972.12 


Leger, Mary, Tr. 


209,800 


2,056.04 


Leggat, Barbara 


606,700 


5,945.66 


Lemander, William & Emily 


391,700 


3,838.66 


Lemire, Robert & Virginia 


387,600 


3,798.48 


Lenington, Robert & Carolyn 


401,000 


3,929.80 


Lennon, James & Kathy Rushby 


265,900 


2,605.82 


Lennon, Stephen & Grace 


360,000 


3,528.00 


Leong, Joseph & Suzanna Szeto 


262,300 


2,570.54 


Lerman, Elizabeth 


474,400 


4,649.12 


Leshick, Margaret 


381,800 


3,741.64 


Leslie, Paul & Elizabeth 


171,500 


1,680.70 


Levey Jr, Harold & Ruth 


307,300 


3,011.54 


Levi, Thomas & Joyce King 


340,100 


3,332.98 


Levin, Alvin & Betty 


430,100 


4,214.98 


Levy, Morris & Wendy 


365,700 


3,583.86 


Levy, Raymond & Nonny 


382,200 


3,745.56 


Li , Mingche & June 


617,100 


6,047.58 


Li, Yao T & Nancy 


558,700 


5,475.26 


Liepins, At is & Diana 


439,700 


4,309.06 


Light Jr, Galen & Lois 


293,100 


2,872.38 


Lincoln, Robert & Mary 


541,200 


5,303.76 


Lincoln Automotive 


484,800 


4,751.04 


Lincoln Homes Corp. 


8,223,500 


80,590.30 


Lincoln Old Town Hall Corp 


118,900 


1,165.22 


Linnell, Zenos & Geraldine 


415,800 


4,074.84 


Linstrom, Peter & Maybelle 


247,900 


2,429.42 


Lippman, Anne c/o Richard 


282,000 


2,763.60 


Lipsey, Steven & Michaela 


617,400 


6,050.52 


Litte, Rudolph 


370,700 


3,632.86 


Little, John & Elizabeth 


405,400 


3,972.92 


Littlefield, Paul & Emmy 


287,700 


2,819.46 


Livermore Jr, Robert & Isabel 


530,800 


5,201.84 


Lo, Chien-Pen & Lucy 


244,300 


2,394.14 


Lo, Steven & Yi-Chao 


291,300 


2,854.74 



222 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1988 





Aggregate Value 


Real Estate 




Real Estate 


Tax 


Locashio, Philip & Constance 


$ 581,400 


% 5,697.72 


Lockwood Jr, Dunbar & Irene 


628,700 


6,161.26 


Loewenstein, Davida 


399,600 


3,916.08 


Loewenstein, Paul & Freud, Sophie 


461,300 


4,520.74 


Long, Cathryn 


413,500 


4,052.30 


Loud, Robert & Gwyneth 


O f O "7 f\ A 

268, 700 


2,633. 26 


Lover ing, Talbot & Emily 


346,600 


3,396.68 


Low, Stephen & Barbara 


434,500 


4,258.10 


Lozen, Stephen & Kristin 


1,167,900 


11,445.42 


Ludden, John & Susan 


376,200 


3,686.76 


Luft, Ludwig & Anne 


379,400 


3,718.12 


Lundquist, Peter & Joan 


606,500 


5,943.70 


Lupo, Robert 


269,700 


2,643.06 


Lustwerk, Ferdinand/lngeborg 


437,100 


4,283.58 


Lutnicki, Harriet 


43,200 


423.36 


Lutnicki, Victor & Harriet 


632,400 


6,197.52 


Lyons, Richard 


271,800 


2,663.64 


Lytle Jr, William 


429,600 


4,210.08 



MacDonald, Winslow & June 


376,200 


3,686.76 


Maclnnis, Hazel 


239,200 


2,344.16 


MacKenzie, Ethel 


494,200 


4,843.16 


MacKenzie, Murdock & Adeline 


352,200 


3,451.56 


MacLaurin, Elfriede 


763,600 


7,483.28 


MacLaurin, Ellen 


509,500 


4,993.10 


MacLean, H Arnold & Corinne 


382,600 


3,749.48 


MacLeod, Josephine 


245,100 


2,401.98 


MacMahon, H Edward & Marian 


289,300 


2,835.14 


MacNeil, Bruce 


437,500 


4,287.50 


MacNeil, John & Madge 


922,000 


9,035.60 


MacNeil, Ronald & Wendy 


241,700 


2,368.66 


MacRae, Susan & Broadbent, Ericsson 


314,300 


3,080.14 


Mahan, Russell & Anastasia 


426,300 


4,177.74 


Mahoney , Anne 


246,800 


2,418.64 


Mahoney, John & Eleanor 


449,300 


4,403.14 


Maier, Emanuel & Sylvia 


506,000 


4,958.80 


Maillet, Joseph 


168,900 


1,655.22 


Maillet, Joseph & Busa Frank 


654,400 


6,413.12 


Malkin, James 


403,300 


3,952.34 


Malloy, David 


175,900 


1,723.82 


Malloy, Robert & David 


101,700 


996.66 


Maloney Jr, Bernard & Janet 


436,300 


4,275.74 


Mannar ino, Joseph & Florence 


206,400 


2,022.72 


Mann ing , Ca th e r i ne 


247,700 


2,427.46 


Mansfield, James & Sarah 


362,500 


3,552.50 


Mansfield, Richard, Mary, Frederick, & Joan 


536,800 


5,260.64 


Manzelli, Donald & Janet 


764,500 


7,492.10 


Manzelli, John & Dorothy 


255,100 


2,499.98 



223 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1988 

Aggregate Value Real Estate 





Real Estate 


Tax 


Maranian, Arthur & Helen 


$ 574,200 


$ 5,627.16 


Marcks, Ronald & Barbara 


449,600 


4,406.08 


Marcus, Fred & Patricia 


401,200 


3,931.76 


Marcuvitz, Andrew & Ileen 


221,300 


2,168.74 


Marier, Bruce & Suzanne 


431,300 


4,226.74 


Maroni, Kevin & Jaman 


652,200 


6,391.56 


Marple, Gary & Meredith Rutter 


492,100 


4,822.58 


Marsden, Peter & Mary 


292,800 


2,869.44 


Marsh, Paul & Margaret 


667,600 


6,542.48 


Mars tall, Jerry & Nancy Clift 


399,400 


3,914.12 


Martin, Robert & Margaret 


288,300 


2,825.34 


Martin, Winslow & Anne 


262,100 


2,568.58 


Martinez, Norberto 


254,200 


2,491.16 


Martini, William & Virginia 


402,000 


3,939.60 


Mascari, Rita & Luciano 


497,200 


4,872.56 


Mason, Betty 


263,300 


2,580.34 


Mason, Richard & Ann 


245,400 


2,404.92 


Mason, Virginia 


457,900 


4,487.42 


Massachusetts Centers, Inc. 


3,077,400 


30,158.52 


Massachusetts Port Authority 


1,756,500 


17,213.70 


Masters, Joseph 


566,500 


5,551.70 


Mathur, Dilip & Estelle 


298,300 


2,923.34 


Mattes, Sara & Ritz, Jerome 


421,700 


4,132.66 


Maurer, David 


235,900 


2,311.82 


May, Doris 


288,600 


2,828.28 


May Jr, James & Linda 


881,800 


8,641.64 


Mayfield, Glover & Gale 


435,000 


4,263.00 


McAleer, Harold & Shirley 


538,600 


5,278.28 


McCart, Robert & Olivo, Nicholas 


1,183,200 


11,595.36 


McCart, Robert Tr. 


556,900 


5,457.62 


McCarthy, Paul & Wladyslawa 


603,200 


5,911.36 


McColl, Archibald & Delight 


274,300 


2,688.14 


McConchie, James & Linda 


536,000 


5,252.80 


McCune, William & Elizabeth 


2,048,600 


20,076.28 


McDougald, Ronald & Kathleen 


615,900 


6,035.82 


McHale, Kevin 


1,062,700 


10,414.46 


McHugh, James & Katherine 


409,900 


4,017.02 


Mclnnes, Richard & Barbara 


706,500 


6,923.70 


Mclnnis, Donald & Joan 


347,100 


3,401.58 


McKennan, Alice 


377,000 


3,694.60 


McKnight, David 


101,200 


991.76 


McKnight, David & Eleanor 


241,600 


2,367.68 


McKnight, Ernest Ex. 


264,100 


2,588.18 


McLaughlin, James 


20,000 


196.00 


McLaughlin, Robert & Roberta 


295,100 


2,891.98 


McMorrow, Maureen & Richard 


670,700 


6,572.86 


Mc Sweeney, Eugene & Barbara 


196,600 


1,926.68 


Mead, Varnum & Janice 


402,800 


3,947.44 


Meade, Edmund & Eleanor 


440,900 


4,320.82 



224 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1988 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 





Real Estate 


Tax 


Mecsas, Michael & Mary 


$ 434,000 


$ 4,253.20 


Meeks, M Littleton & Louise 


440,100 


4,312.98 


Meenan, Marion 


447,500 


4,385.50 


Melanson, Leonard & Mary 


208,400 


2,042.32 


Menino, Mary 


344,200 


3,373.16 


Meriam, Ellin 


316,500 


3,101.70 


Merrill, Vincent & Anne 


310,900 


3,046.82 


Merullo, Anthony 


326,700 


3,201.66 


Messina, Elena 


569,500 


5,581.10 


Meyer, Eugene & Melissa 


989,100 


9,693.18 


Michener, Susanah 


212,700 


2,084.46 


Middle ton, Neil & Susan A 


524,500 


5,140.10 


Mikropoulos, Harilaos Tr. 


557,500 


5,463.50 


Milender, Sumner & Edith 


543,200 


5,323.36 


Millard, Donald & Jeannette 


764,900 


7,496.02 


Millard Jr, Donald/ Catherine 


676,700 


6,631.66 


Millard, Susan & David 


790,800 


7,749.84 


Miller, David & Karen 


231,500 


2,268.70 


Miller, Harold & Marcheta 


547,900 


5,369.42 


Miller, Keith & Janet 


578,600 


5,670.28 


Miller, Peter 


377,400 


3,698.52 


Miller, Stephen & Natalie 


471,400 


4,619.72 


Miller, Wayne 


527,300 


5,167.54 


Mills, Marie F.A.L. 


434,900 


4,262.02 


Minnick, Martha 


263,600 


2,583.28 


Mintz, Norbett & Carol 


465,400 


4,560.92 


Mix, Thomas 


422,000 


4,135.60 


Mixon, Scott 


368,000 


3,606.40 


Moeller, Robert 


699,300 


6,853.14 


Mohr, John & Jean 


855,900 


8,387.82 


Moldave, Peter M 


159,300 


1,561.14 


Moller, Cynthia 


252,600 


2,475.48 


Montgomery, Maurice/Florence 


304,800 


2,987.04 


Moor, Edgar & Joan 


661,100 


6,478.78 


Moore, Dorothy 


294,700 


2,888.06 


Moore, Elizabeth 


247,700 


2,427.46 


Moore, Murvale & Negarre 


407,900 


3,997.42 


Moran, David & Mary B. 


408,700 


4,005.26 


Morey, Kenneth & Ruth 


226,600 


2,220.68 


Morgan, Edward & Terri 


251,100 


2,460.78 


Morgan, Henry & Gwen 


563,800 


5,525.24 


Morgan III, Robert & Marcia 


971,000 


9,515.80 


Morganti, Victor & Helga 


540,200 


5,293.96 


Morris, Beatrice 


165,500 


1,621.90 


Morris, Lloyd & Katherine 


286,300 


2,805.74 


Morrissey, J Neil & Mary 


266,400 


2,610.72 


Morse, Thomas 


540,500 


5,296.90 


Morse, William & Patricia 


685,500 


6,717.90 


Morss Jr, Charles 


225 386,000 


3,782.80 









VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1988 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 





Real Estate 




Tax 


Morton, Peter & Judy 


$ 317, 


600 


* 3, 


112.48 


Moses, Meredyth & John 


533, 


700 


5, 


230.26 


Mosher, David & Claire 


905, 


100 


8, 


869.98 


Mosher & Schliemann, Trs. 


58, 


600 




574.28 


Mosher, D & C, Schliemann, P & D 


124, 


800 


1, 


223.04 


Moss, Elizabeth 


733, 


200 


7, 


185.36 


Moss, James & Katherine Gimbel 


281, 


100 


2, 


754.78 


Moss, Karen 


342, 


500 


3, 


356.50 


Moss, Leonard & Frances 


348, 


400 


3, 


414.32 


Moss , Philip & Jane 


441, 


200 


4, 


323.76 


Moss, Sidney 


19, 


500 




191.10 


Moss, Sidney & Silke 


446, 


500 


4, 


375.70 


Mount, Wayne & Claire 


397, 


500 


3, 


895.50 


Mozzi, Robert & Ruth 


431, 


,700 


4, 


230.66 


Mrakovich, David & Gertrude 


385. 


,700 


3, 


779.86 


Mrugala, Anthony 


287, 


000 


2, 


812.60 


Mudge, Jeffrey 


268, 


200 


2, 


628.36 


Mueller, Robert & Jane 


611, 


,700 


5, 


994.66 


Mulcahy, Douglas & Beverly F 


239. 


,000 


2, 


342.20 


Munroe Jr, William & Mary 


422, 


800 


4, 


143.44 


Murphy, Bartholomew & Silverstein, Sara 


299, 


,400 


2, 


934.12 


Murphy, Ruth 


486, 


000 


4, 


762.80 


Murphy Jr, William & Louise 


1, 


,500 




14.70 


Mutschler, Louis & Phyllis 


425, 


,000 


4, 


,165.00 


Myers, Lucy 


303, 


,500 


2, 


,974.30 


Mygatt, Samuel & Susan H 


475. 


,300 


4, 


,657.94 


Myles, Theresa & J Richard 


440 . 


,500 


4 : 


,316.90 


Nabih, Ismail 


525, 


,300 


5, 


147.94 


Nadolski, Thomas & Rosemary 


458 


,200 


4, 


,490.36 


Nagy, John 


498, 


,500 


4, 


,885.30 


Naiman, Mark & Adeline 


301, 


,200 


2, 


,951.76 


Najarian, K George & Carolann 


685, 


,100 


6 ; 


,713.98 


Najjar, Edward & Gail 


541 


,500 


5, 


,306.70 


Napier, Sylvia & Fitts, Charles, Jr 


242, 


,900 


2, 


,380.42 


Nardone, Nancy & Anthony 


578 


,600 


5 : 


,670.28 


Narod, Joel 


262 : 


,000 


2 : 


,567.60 


Nawoichik, Elsie Adm 


565 


,300 


5 


,539.94 


Neely, John & Sullivan, Christine 


408 


,800 


4. 


,006.24 


Neiley, Alexander & Diana 


440 


,000 


4 


,312.00 


Nelson, Albert, Marjorie & Robert 


306 


,500 


3, 


,003.70 


Nelson, Estate of Jean (Parsons) 


493 


,100 


4, 


,832.38 


Nenneman, Richard & Catherine 


508 


,300 


4, 


,981.34 


Neri , John & Ingrid 


233 


,000 


2 


,283.40 


Nessen, E. Richard 


517 


,400 


5, 


,070.52 


Nesto, Bruno 


21 


,500 




210.70 


Neumann, Ernest & Sylvia 


894 


,400 




,765.12 


Neumann, Sylvia 


33 


,800 




331.24 



226 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1988 





Aggregate 


Value 


Keai iiiSLaLe 




Real Estate 


To v 

xax 


Newbold , Thomas 


tfr 1 O /. 

$ lo4 , 


7U0 


<fc 1 81 OA 
$ J. , OXU . UD 


Newbold, Thomas & Noreen 


245, 


300 


/■ O "5 Q /. 


Newburger, Babette 




O AA 


A 1 Q A A 
h , ±?Z . hh 


Newcombe, Charles & Lawrence 


At Q 


000 




Newcombe, Lawrence 


195, 


ZUU 


1 Q1 9 Q£ 

1 , yiz .ye 


7\J QTjri 1 "1 T O. 
llcWclij J-icIlcl 


273, 


800 


n 8 1 

^ , U O J • Z. H 


Newman , Daisy 


170 
1/J, 


^00 

JUU 


1 698 14 


Newman, Robert & Mary S 


1 A01 


/ uu 


1 "3 Q^O Oft 
1j , 7JZ . ZD 


Newton, Estate of Harland 


334, 


000 


1 271 20 


Newton Jr, George & Suzanne 


446 


500 


4,375.70 


Nicholson, Kathryn 


601* 


500 


5', 894*. 70 


Nickerson, Bruce 


248, 


500 


2,435.30 


Nickerson, Elizabeth P 


556, 


600 


5,454.68 


Nicolaides , Paris Tr. 


856, 


100 


8,389.78 


Niles, Robert & Virginia 


372 

J/ £. j 


900 


3,654.42 


Nisbet, Ian & Shirley 


348, 


900 


3,419.22 


Nockles, William & Diane 


394 


,600 


3,867.08 


Nopakun, Suvitya & Apilaj 


521 
J ' J i 


100 


5,126.38 


Nat! Ino RobPTl" ft .Tppn 


317, 


,800 


3,114.44 


Norris , Mary 


293 


900 


2,880.22 


Noss, George & Millicent 


241 


,900 


2,370.62 


Mnf n T.onn;jT*H & Ann 
Ii U L Iv-Lil , Xjc UlldL U. Q£ rvLLLI 


384 j 


100 


3,764.18 




684 


500 


6,708.10 


0^ k Tn oi 1 1 & ^of-ciil^A 


427 


,000 


4,184.60 


w y , 1 1 cu uc i xuiciiLc 


nQ7 


100 


6,833.54 


O'Brien Darnpl & Marv 


16? 
JO Z, i 


100 

, J uu 


3,550.54 


' Rri pn Tnhn 


1 


1 00 

( xuu 


1,363.18 


O'Brien, Joseph & Virginia 


333! 


, 100 


3,264.38 


' Trinnnr Oam'pl 

\J \->U LLLLU L , JJaillcl 


228 


,300 


2,237.34 


O'Connor, John 


£87 

HO / , 


000 
, uuu 


4,772.60 




511 


100 

, JUU 


5,206.74 


Ohl Rnbprt & Trlna 




800 

, OUU 


1,213.24 


Okin, Robert & Susan 


825 


,100 


8,085.98 


01 H Rtiiap & Ifafharn no 

vlUj 1J1 ULC VJI i\aLUalXUC 


273 


,400 


2,679.32 


Old Bedford Road Realty Trust 


1,610 


,300 


15', 780. 94 


Old Concord Road Trust 


187 


,300 


1,835.54 


Olivier! , James & Dorothy 


160 


,700 


1,574.86 


O'Loughlin, John & Joanne 


404 


,200 


3,961.16 


Olsen, Kenneth & Elva-Liisa 


832 


,000 


8,153.60 


Olshansky, Kenneth 
O'Neil, David 


309 


,600 


3,034.08 


410 


,500 


4,022.90 


Ong, Robin & Hsiao-Mei Hu 


638 


,500 


6,257.30 


Onigman, Marc & Maureen 


268 


,100 


2,627.38 


Order of Saint Anne 


193 


,000 


1,891.40 


O'Rourke, Paul & Marilyn 


1,015 


,500 


9,951.90 


Orzell, Frank & Ann R. 


456 


,000 


4,468.80 


Osborne, Gordon 


979 


,300 


9,597.14 



227 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1988 



Aggregate Value 
Real Estate 



Real Estate 
Tax 



Out ten, Henry 
Owen, Charles 
Owen, Donald 
Owen R Calvin & Ellen 
Oxbow Realty Trust 



& Nancy 

& MacAloney, Phyllis 



$ 345,100 
317,500 
349,500 
323,700 
1,500 



3,381.98 
3,111.50 
3,425.10 
3,172.26 
14.70 



Paboojian-Hagopian, Helen 


325,300 


3,187.94 


Paddock, Ann & Kelley, Penny 


123,800 


1,213.24 


Paddock, James & 11 ga 


565,800 


5,544.84 


Page, Lot & Patricia 


490,900 


4,810.82 


Page, Stanley & Elisabeth 


256,700 


2,515.66 


Page Jr, Walter & Susan 


589,300 


5,775.14 


Paglierani, Lawrence & Pamela 


358,400 


3,512.32 


Paik, Sungik & Wanda 


512,800 


5,025.44 


Palmer, Attelio & Kathryne 


283,400 


2,777.32 


Pampel, Roland & Carol 


624,100 


6,116.18 


Panetta, Frank 


333,500 


3,268.30 


Panetta, Frank & James 


24,900 


244.02 


Panetta, Frank & Theresa 


315,400 


3,090.92 


Panetta, James & Rosemary 


208,600 


2,044.28 


Panetta, Salvatore & Rita 


230,100 


2,254.98 


Pantazelos, Peter & Hytho 


876,200 


8,586.76 


Pareek, Purna 


529,000 


5,184.20 


Paris, Judith 


145,000 


1,421.00 


Park, Charles & Pauline 


396,100 


3,881.78 


Parke IV, Nathan & Ann I 


487,500 


4,777.50 


Parker, Charles & Helen 


329,800 


3,232.04 


Parker, Jackson & Jacqueline 


400,300 


3,922.04 


Parla, John 


556,800 


5,456.64 


Parsons, David & Mary 


446,300 


4,373.74 


Pastoriza, James & Ruth 


557,600 


5,464.48 


Patalano, Vincent & Sandra 


1,164,800 
184,300 


11,415.04 


Paul, Louise 


1,806.14 


Payne, H Morse & Helen 


242,600 


2,377.48 


Payne, Roger 


373,200 


3,657.36 


Payne, William & Mary 


615,500 


6,031.90 


Pearlman, Robert 


284,200 


2,785.16 


Pearmain, W Robert & Claire 


604,700 


5,926.06 


Peavy Jr , Leopold & Elizabeth 


771,300 


7,558.74 


Peirce, Isabel 


385,900 


3,781.82 


Peloquin, Roy 


228,500 


2,239.30 


Perch, Alvin & Geraldine 


603,600 


5,915.28 


Perera Jr, Guido & Joan 


686,700 


6,729.66 


Perlman, Samuel & Marjorie 


957,100 


9,379.58 


Perlmutter, Steven & Terry 


575,900 


5,643.82 


Perrault, Norm, Guy, Patricia 


238,600 


2,338.28 


Perry, A.W. & Judith 


442,500 


4,336.50 


Perry, John & Marilyn 


265,900 


2,605.82 



228 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1988 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 





Real Estate 


Tax 


Perry, John & Sarah 


$ 445,600 


$ 4,366.88 


Perry, Richard & Nancy 


514,300 


5,040.14 


Pertzoff, Olga 


17,000 


166.60 


Peterson, Mary 


640,500 


6,276.90 


Pettigrew, Valerie & Brian 


678,700 


6,651.26 


Phelps, Elaine 


268,700 


2,633.26 


Phelps, Robert & Elizabeth 


416,000 


4,076.80 


Phelps-Braun, Diane 


465,800 


4,564.84 


Phillipps, Patrick & Janice 


547,500 


5,365.50 


Phillips, Charlotte 


750,000 


7,350.00 


Phinney, Jean 


261,400 


2,561.72 


Pho , Johnny & Ada 


444,400 


4,355.12 


Pianka, Walter & Ann 


427,400 


4,188.52 


Picardi, Brigitte 


295,200 


2,892.96 


Piccinini, Helen 


289,700 


2,839.06 


Pickett, Robert & Andrew 


4o2, 4UU 


4,727.52 


Pickman, Anthony & Alice 


1,256,100 


1 1 OA A 7Q 

12 , 309 . /o 


Pierce, James & Vivian W. 


337,800 


3,310.44 


Pier son, Marie & Mark 


301,700 


2,956 .66 


Pike, John & Mary 


639,900 


6,271.02 


Pikl, Gerolf & Barbara 


444,600 


4,357.08 


Pingeon, James 


228,900 


2,243.22 


Pino, Frank 


259,200 


2,540.16 


Pinto, Robert & Clare 


495,100 


4,851.98 


Pippen, Wesley 


194,000 


1,901.20 


Plouffe, Francis & Gerene 


344,400 


3,375.12 


Plukas, John & Anne 


750,700 


7,356.86 


Ponn, Richard & Nancy 


958,500 


9,393.30 


Postel, Sholem 


313,000 


3,067.40 


Potter, Ruth/DiLuzio , Rudolph 


436,200 


4,274.76 


Poulos , Charles & Sophie 


374,900 


3,674.02 


Poulos, L Charles 


220,100 


2,156.98 


Powers Jr, Francis & Helen 


231,200 


2,265.76 


Powers, Martin & Diana 


256,200 


2,510.76 


Preston, Katharine 


293,700 


2,878.26 


Preston, William M 


747,700 


7,327.46 


Priest, Sarah/Breed, Charles 


450,800 


4,417.84 


Privitera, Salvatore & Doris 


640,700 


6,278.86 


Protopapa, Sejfi 


508,800 


4,986.24 


Pruitt, Stephen & Denise 


247,100 


2,421.58 


Prussing, Carl & Karen 


10,900 


106.82 


Puffer Jr, Richard & Margaret 


458,100 


4,489.38 


Pugh III, Alexander & Julia 


419,800 


4,114.04 


Quarton, Gardner & Frances 


354,800 


3,477.04 


Quelch, John & Joyce 


941,700 


9,228.66 


Raag, Valvo & Kaija 


761,000 


7,457.80 


Rabinowitz , Samuel/ Stanislawa 


408,300 


4,001.34 



229 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1988 

Aggregate Value Real Estate 





Real Estate 


iax 


Kagan, K.a±pii <x rvutii 


<fc 306 

$ JUU , 


son 


* 3 003 70 


Kagan, Kaipn k. 


99 


300 


973 1 4 


Raghavan , Lakshminarasimhan 


SQA 
j?4, 


.?uu 


S 830 02 


Kaja, Koy a riiien 


JUO , 


900 


3 615.22 


Rando, Thomas J 


AQ S 
4^j, 


Ann 

4UU 


4,854.92 


Rappaport , Jerome & Phyllis 


OOU , 


nnn 
uuu 


a 694 nn 

O , U£t • uu 


Rapperport, Eugene & Lucy 


3A9 
J4? , 


finn 

uuu 


3 426 08 


Rappoli, Arthur & Dorothy 


JZO , 


nnn 


3,214.40 


Rasco, Austin & Suzanne 


si n 


9nn 
zuu 


4, 999 .96 


oVll n Taut o A". QVl it1 ft tt 

Kasnin, .louis oc onirxey 


384, 


200 


3,765.16 


Raws on , Edward & Nancy 


9P.A 
JOO , 


9nn 


3,785.74 


Ray, Kenneth & Marjorie 


JZO , 


7nn 

/ uu 


3 901 66 

J , £. U.L iOO 


Rayner, Evelyn H. 


ZOU , 


nnn 
uuu 


2 548 00 


Read, J Leighton/Mokrovich, Carol 


O AO 

jUo, 


/. A A 

400 


3 099 39 
J, UZZ • JZ 


Redden, Linda 


07 A 


9 nn 
ZUU 


O 7f\C 7A 
Z,/UO./0 


Redmond, Rosemary 


/. o o 
422, 


9 aa 


A 1 38 SA 

4 , X JO • JH 


Reece, Richard & Susan 


40 J j 


QAA 

,oUU 


A S6A 8A 
4 , J04 • 04 


Re id, Cynthia 


242, 


O AA 

, ZUU 


9 373 S6 
Z, J/J. JO 


Reidel, Arthur H 


Zo4 , 


9nn 
, JUU 


9 7P.6 1A 
Z , /OO . ±4 


Reider, W James & Ruth 


401 , 


o.nn 

, JUU 


A S9n 7A 


Reiman, Peter & Patricia 


one 


ann 
, ouu 


3 nn6 64 

J , uu u . ut 


Reinherz, Bernard & Barbara 


77 / 

"4j 


i UUU 


7 585 20 


Reinherz, Ellis L 


9Q 7 


nnn 
,uuu 


3 890 60 


Reiser, George 


0Z0 , 


3nn 

, JUU 


8 097 74 


Reiman, Arnold & Harriet 


S40 

JtU 


500 


5,296.90 


Repko, Bruce 


1 QQ 

107 , 


9 nn 
, J uu 


1,855.14 


Resnick, Charles & Marie 


«;99 


Ann 

,4UU 


S 917 S9 

J , Z _L / • J£ 


rvlCCl, K.usseil (x oana 


SI 9 


, tuu 


5,021.52 


Rice, Clifton & Margaret 


486 


,800 


4,770.64 


Kice, Da via d . 


367 

JO / : 


7nn 

, / uu 


3,603.46 


Rice, James & Barbara 


285 


,500 


2',797.90 


nice, jonn a JNatnaiie 


99Q 
ZZ :7 


nnn 
, uuu 


2,244.20 


Rice, Paul G 


979 


snn 

, JUU 


9 670 50 


Kicnarus, tvuun 


3A6 


i nn 

, _LUU 


3,391.78 


Richardson, Frederick & Ingemarie 


370 


,100 


3,626.98 


Rikpr F.vplvn 


242 


,200 


2,373.56 


Risch, Martin 


307 


,400 


3,012.52 


Risley, Curtis & Jean 


367 


,000 


3,596.60 


Risser, Thomas & Tranquilina 


958 


,300 


9,391.34 


Ritsher, John 


408 


,300 


4,001.34 


Rizzo, Jane 


426 


,300 


4,177.74 


Robb, Stephen J. 


277 


,900 


2,723.42 


Robb, Stephen Tr. 


525 


,900 


5,153.82 


Robbat, Joseph & Dana 


1,104 


,700 


10,826.06 


Robbins, Frederick 


382 


,300 


3,746.54 


Robbins, Roland & Geraldine 


253 


,400 


2,483.32 


Robey, Harriet 


303 


,300 


2,972.34 


Robinson, Donald & Hoagland, Sandra 


225 


,100 


2,205.98 


Robinson, John & Ragnhild 


485 


,800 


4,760.84 



230 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1988 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 





Real Estate 


Tax 


Robinson, Thomas & Lessie 


i cnn /.r\r\ 
1 , byy , 4UU 


_ i c _c/. i o 
$16 ,6_>4.1_ 


Rodman, Laura 


o r\ r\ r\ r\r\ 

809,000 


7,928.20 


Roehr, Marcia 


765,500 


7,501.90 


______ k ~% r ,_ , j r t _ • 

Rogers, Alfred _ Louise 


416,000 


4,076.80 


Rogers, Diana 


951 ,700 


9,326.66 


Rogers, Harriet J 


352,900 


3,458.42 


Rogers, Joseph H 


ion Qnn 
lou , j\j\j 


1 77 Q 
1 , / / 1 . oZ 


Rogers, Mabelle, Winifred, Evelyn 


con o a a 

52y,300 


5, 187. 14 


Rolfe, Edward & Stephanie 


ooi aaa 

jyi , yoo 


O O / A _ O 

3, o40.62 


Rollins, James & Norma 


/ / / "7AA 

444, 700 


4,358.06 


Rood , Jane 


tic cr\r\ 

llo , 600 


2,220.68 


Rose, James & Glenys 


oo-i Ann 
JZ1 , ouu 


1 CI (L Q 

J , 1j1 .oo 


Rose, Stuart & Margie 


AP.P. Ann 
'too , ouu 


A 7QP, 9P, 
t , / oo . zo 


Rncon XT c I - Vi o 7* 


262 100 


2 ,570. 54 


Rosen, Joseph 


si a inn 


S OSQ 74 


Rnqpn Paul iC Annof t- o 
ivuocii ^ -dLIX Lx rVilllc L. Lc 


292 700 


— , VJ UO . H U 


Rosenthal, Richard _ Blanche 


oa^ 7nn 
ZO J , / uu 


9 SP.A 9n 
Z , JO *t • — o 


Rosenwald, Harold _ Betty 


s^i snn 


9np 7n 

J,_ uo. /u 


D — oo Paul £ D 4 f a 

K.OSS) xraui Oc rvlua 


460 400 


4 511.92 




412 400 


A 0A1 52 


Rossiter, Selina 


AAA Ann 
too , ouu 


A 768 68 


D A n n An i* T — V\ — X _<-i_.1_ 

Kossoni, jonn _ raoia 


7AA 7nn 
/ HO , / uu 


7 ^1 7 A A 
/ , Jl / .00 


Rossoni, Paola 


171 100 

1/ J , JUU 


1 fiQfi 1A 

J- , U JO iJI 


P - t" Vi flair-? A 
AULll) L/aVlU 


544 100 


5,332.18 


Pnnccosn TaVi Ti T* t* 
rvUUoocaU) UUllll, 11 i 


623 700 


6,112 .26 


Row, Ronald _ Jane 


tDl , 7UU 


A S9n fi^ 
H,J_O.U-. 


Rowe, Standish S 


ceo cnn 
JDo , JUU 


c. ^7i on 

J, J/1 . JU 


Roy, Eugene U. 


oo.a pnn 
Z JO , ouu 


9 "39n AA 
Z , JZU .0'+ 


Rudnick, Mitchell & Rosalie 


7A c onn 
/UJ , zUU 


A Ql n QA 

o , yiu . jo 


Rugo, Henry & Faith 


JJZ ,oUU 


J , Z Zl . 4 


Dili o T?-_ — ^ T.7 

Kuiana , rrea w. 


Ann qnn 
oou , juu 


A AAA Q A 


Rural Land Foundation 


O A O "7 *7 A A 

3,087 ,700 


OA OCA /. c 

j(J,2 jy.46 


Russell, Mary-Ellen 


/. o c a A A 

4jj ,oUU 


/, A n Q Q 

4 , Zoo .oo 


Russell, Michael & Nancy P. 


onn 
J/0 , o uu 


3,202.64 


Russell, Miles & Elaine 


719 700 
/ JZ , / UU 


7 ion Afi 


Russell, William & Anne 


1,080,100 


10,584.98 


Ryan, Alice B. 


364,000 


3,567.20 


Ryan, Alice & Chisholm Margaret 


18,000 


176.40 


Ryan, Alice/Sweeney , John 


180,900 


1,772.82 


Ryan, Frank A. 


239,900 


2,351.02 


Ryan, James & Helen 


282,800 


2,771.44 


Ryan, Marjorie H. 


399,400 


3,914.12 


Ryan, William & Helen 


455,200 


4,460.96 


Ryel, Joann 


229,900 


2,253,02 


Sabbag, Arthur & Evelyn 


285,800 


2,800.84 


Sacerdote, Luciana 


245,300 


2,403.94 


Sacknoff, Eric & Kathleen 


816,800 


8,004.64 


Sakowich, Stephen & Kasiecki, Janice 


171,600 


1,681.68 
7,106.96 


Salem, Deeb & Patricia 


725,200 



231 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1988 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 





Real Estate 


Tax 


Salmon, Walter & Marjorie 


$ 462,400 


$ 4,531.52 


Sanadi, D Rao & Mary Jane 


416,900 


4,085.62 


Sands, Mary M. 


293,600 


2,877.28 


Santa, Cecelia F. 


299,200 


2,932.16 


Sargent, Dennis 


461,900 


4,526.62 


Sartor i, Louis & Ruth 


444,900 


4,360.02 


Sartori, Louis R. 


154,900 


1,518.02 


Satterfield, Charles & Anne 


475,300 


4,657.94 
3,514.28 


Savage, William G. 


358,600 


Sawtell, Clement & Adelaide 


376,300 


3,687.74 


Schacht, Joel & Barbara 


371,500 


3,640.70 


Schatzberg, Alan & Nancy 


421,200 


4,127.76 
1,663.06 


Scheff, Andrew 


169,700 


Scheff , Benson & Betty 


472,300 


4,628.54 


Scheft, William & Gertrude 


312,200 


3,059.56 


Scheuer, Harry 


393,000 


3,851.40 


Schildbach, Muriel 


274,600 


2,691.08 


Schliemann, Peter C. 


629,300 


6,167.14 


Schmertzler, Margaretta & Alvin 


524,900 


5,144.02 


Schmid, Wilfried & Marina 


865,100 


8,477.98 


Schneider, Robert & Patricia 


564,400 


5,531.12 


Schudy, Robert & Linelle 


141,500 


1,386.70 


Schuller, Edward & Elizabeth 


388,700 


3,809.26 


Schulte, Robert & Linda S 


695,500 


6,815.90 


Schwann, William 


260,700 


2,554.86 


Schwann, William & Aire—Maija 


414,800 


4,065.04 


Schwartz, Edward 


560,900 


5,496.82 


Schwartz, Judah & Ellen 


391,100 


3,832.78 


Scott, Bruce & Anne 


645,100 


6,321.98 


Scott, Eleanor 


362,800 


3,555.44 


Scotti, Regina 


212,000 


2,077.60 


Seaver, John & Millicent 


428,700 


4,201.26 


Seckler, Donald & Joann S. 


256,000 


2,508.80 


Sederquist, Douglas/Patricia 


221,300 


2,168.74 


Sedgwick, Harold B. 


431,600 


4,229.68 


Seeckts, Ehlert William & Eleanor 


621,100 


6,086.78 


Seeley, George & Susan 


303,400 


2,973.32 


Self, Craig 


277,300 


2,717.54 


Selland, James 0. 


267,000 


2,616.60 


Seising, Erik & Jo-Ellen 


241,700 


2,368.66 


Semerjian, Evan & Barbara 


487,700 


4,779.46 


Seville, Alfred & Joan 


392,000 


3,841.60 
7,528.36 


Sewall, Steven & Susan 


768,200 


Shallah, George & Lynda 


267,600 


2,622.48 


Shansky, David & Nettie 


414,900 


4,066.02 


Shapiro, David & Esther 


482,000 


4,723.60 


Shapse, Steven N. 


195,300 


1,913.94 


Sharpe , John & Jeanne 


345,100 


3,381.98 


Shaw, Michael & Lynette 


627,200 


6,146.56 



232 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1988 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 





Real Estate 


Tax 


Sheehan, Gerald & Brigid 


$ 330,000 


X A A A / A A 

$ 3,234.00 


Sheldon, Mary W. 


375,400 


3,678.92 


Shuman, Mark & Lena 


522,700 


5,122.46 


Shyam-Sunder, Sivaraj & Lakshml 


360,800 


3,535.84 


Sichel, Enid 


329,300 


3,227.14 


Silverstein, Fred & Mary 


285,300 


2,795.94 


Simmons, Jeffrey & Patricia 


/•Art AAA 

609 ,200 


5, 970.16 


Simon, Michael & Margaret 


425,000 


4,165.00 


Simourian, John 


507,200 


4,970.56 


Sisson, John & Barbara 


660, 500 


6,472.90 


Skinner, Louis & Hope 


987 ,500 


9,677.50 


Slavin, Gerald D 


355,300 


3,481.94 


Slayter, Henry & Elizabeth 


ion onn 

339,300 


3,325.14 


Sliski, Alan & Susan 


O O "7 7 A A 

Jo7 , /UU 


O 7 A A /. C 

J, 799 .46 


Smallman, Robert & Mary 


636 ,600 


6 ,238 .68 


bmitn, Alan ot Marjone 


coo o ah 
JZZ,ZUU 


C 117 

J, 11/ . JO 


Smith, Beverly 


/. Q AAA 
Z40 , OUU 


A A 9 ft 
Z ,HJO . ZO 


bmitn, can ot riorence 


in/. AAA 

JUH , u uu 


Q7 Q OA 
Z , 7/ 7. ZU 


bmitn, Lonn a uiana 


A99 1 A A 

HZZ , 1UU 


A 1 9A ^ft 
4 , 1JO . JO 


bmitn, converse ot Nellie 


/. CI A A 

4 Jl , ZUU 


/. /. o 1 7 A 
H , HZ1 . /o 


Smith, Edward & Anne 


O /> Q 7 A A 
Z47, /(JU 


/. /. 7 A A 
Z ,44/ .UO 


bmitn, Harold & Elizabeth 


391,000 


o o oi on 
JjoJl.oU 


buiiLii, is.a.Lnj_eeTi 


9A9 9AA 
ZHZ , ZUU 


z , J / J . JO 


bmitn, reter d* Linda 


1 C AA 
1 , JUU 


1 A 7 A 
14 . / U 


C m t <- Vi Cl-ovon & Ifaroti 
oiuxlu, OLcVcu ot r\.a.i. cii 


■5^Q AA 


3,324.16 


bmitn, wmiam ot oarDara 


9Q/i ftAA 


9 Q P.O. AA 
Z , 007 ,U4 


Smulowicz, Bronislaw/Sawera 


^5 ftAA 
JJJ , OUU 


J , HO O • OH 


bnemng , Lnaries 


onq o aa 
jUj , OUU 


9 QQA ft A 
Z ,7 70 .OH 


bnelling, Howard d* Llizabetn 


7 7 /. A A 

Z/ / ,4UU 


9 71 Q R 9 
Z , /10 . JZ 


Snelling, Jacquelyn 


07A QAA 

j/u, yuu 


0. CO/, QO 
J , O JH . Z 


bnelling, jonn k 


010 AAA 
Z1Z , H UU 


9 Aftl R9 
Z , UOl . J Z 


Snelling , Norman & Carolyn 


1 O O *7 A A 

282, 700 


O "7 "7 A /. £ 

Z, 7/0.46 


Society Preservation N.E. Antiquities 


221,600 


2,171.68 


Solar, Barry & Judith 


564,300 


5,530.14 


Solar, Robert & Jane 


429,100 


4,205.18 


Solman, Fred John & Claire 


442,700 
303,400 


4,338.46 


Spaeth, Daniel & Margaret 


2,973.32 


Speen, George & Claire 


576,400 


5,648.72 


Speert, Peter & Faye 


654,000 


6,409.20 


Sperling, Arnold & Charmian 


435,700 


4,269.86 


Spindler, James & Mary 


697,900 


6,839.42 


Spinosa, Robert & Kathleen 


600,500 


5,884.90 


Spooner, Susan B. 


165,300 


1,619.94 


Sprague, John L 


284,300 


2,786.14 


Sprayregen, Lucy 


532,100 


5,214.58 


Squibb, Mildred G. 


200,600 


1,965.88 


Squire, James & Barbara 


607,300 


5,951.54 


Stam, Allan & Kathleen 


805,600 


7,894.88 


S tankard, Charles & Jean 


418,300 


4,099.34 


233 





VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1988 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 





Real Estate 


Tax 


Stanzler, Alan & Margaret 


•+ 1 O 1 t t\C\ 

$ 731,400 


$ 7,167.72 


Stason, William & Susan 


585,900 


5,741.82 


Staszesky, Barbara & Francis 


290,600 


2,847 .88 


Stathos , Charles & Margaret 


c /. a -i a a 
DH\J , 1UU 


c OQO QQ 


Stebbins Realty Trust 


Ihh , :?UU 


o Ann n 9 
Z , 4UU . uz 


Stecher, Robert & Barbara 


COT A AA 

5ol, 9UU 


C "7 A O 

5 , /Uz . 62 


Stein, Kitty/Langell, John 


oqa son 

ZOH- , JUU 


9 7ftft 1 n 

£ , / OO ilU 


Steinsky, Rudolph & Veronica 


O 1 O 1 A A 

313 , 1UU 


O ACQ OQ 

J , Uuo . JO 


Stetson, David & Athena 


ci 7 £i AA 

j1/ , 6UU 


5 r»7 Aft 

J,U/Z .'fO 


Stevens, Edmund & Shari 


j/ / , jUU 


J, DJ7 . 3U 


Stevenson, John & Patricia 


/.AO CAA 

4Uo , jUU 


H , UU J . jU 


Stevenson, Philip & Joan 


C07 CAA 


^ i aq ^n 


Stewart, Francis & Ruth, 


jyo , juu 


"3 P. .*} 7A 
J , OOJ • / H 


Stimmell, David & Grace 


1 O O C AA 

282,500 


O 7tO C A 
Z , /DO . JU 


Stoddard, Roger & Helen 


CIA CAA 

JlU , DUU 


D , UUZ .7U 


Stone, Edmund 


1,037.400 


1U, lDO.JZ 


Storer, James & Sandra A. 


457 ,600 




Stratford Realty 


1,492 ,900 


1 / C OA /. O 

14,630.42 


Stratton, Michael & Nancy 


OOi t A A 

331, 1UU 


O /. /. 7 Q 

3 , Z44 . / o 


Street, Earle & Janet 


/. ~l O 1 A A 

472 , 1UU 


/■ cot CO 
4 , OZO . JO 


Striker, Marjorie 


294 400 


2,885.12 


Strock, Bruce & Deborah 


603, '8 00 


5^917.24 


Subsick, Walter J. 


1,500 


14.70 


Sugar, Elizabeth/ Mason, Max 


300,600 


2,945.88 


Summers , James & Julia 


» 391,500 


3,836.70 


Sussman, Joseph & Henri-Ann 


495,200 


4,852.96 


Sutherland, Robert & Ann 


408,300 


4,001.34 


Svetz, Paul & Linda 


435,200 


4,264.96 


Swain, Douglas & Rhonda 


436,800 


4,280.64 


Swans on, Richard & Nancy 


266,000 
419,400 


2,606.80 


Sweeney, Carl & Alice 


4,110.12 


Swett, Joan 


284,300 


2,786.14 


Swift, Phyllis 


420,200 


4,117.96 


Sykes, Margaret 


360,900 


3,536.82 


Sylvia, Craig, Paul & Mark 


311,400 


3,051.72 



Tang, Eric & Doreen 
Tang, Thomas, Connie , Nora , Lisa 
Tanner t, H Michael & Joanna H 
Tartaglia, Giovanni & Lucia 
Taschioglou, Kemon & Rhoda 
Tatlock, Richard & Jane 
Taunt on-Rigby , Alison 
Tavilla, J David & Dorothea 
Taylor, David & Cormay, Theodore 
Taylor, Edward S. 
Taylor, Frederick & Lex 
Taylor, Julius & Lois 



234 



848,100 
222,200 
355,900 
273,700 
573,700 
503,800 
336,700 
709,500 
222,200 
529,300 
390,400 
509,900 



8,311.33 
2,177.56 
3,437.82 
2,682.26 
5,622.26 
4,937.24 
3,299.66 
6,953.10 
2,177.56 
5,187.14 
3,825.92 
4,997.02 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1988 



Aggregate Value Real Estate 





Real Estate 


Tax 


Taylor, Lillian C. 


$ 248,100 


$ 2,431.38 


Taylor, Timothy & Jeannine 


298,500 


2,925.30 


Taylor, W Royce & Dorothy 


373,300 


3,658.34 


Taylor, William & Joyce 


615,100 


6,027.98 


Teabo, Prince & Elizabeth 


272,000 


2,665.60 


Telling, Irving & Jane 


413,900 


4,056.22 


Tenneco, Inc. 


1,700 


16.66 


Tennican, Michael & Catherine 


532,700 


5,220.46 


Terrell, John & Mary 


292,800 


2,869.44 


Tetreault, Claire F. 


447,900 


4,389.42 


Theriault, Richard & Vita 


610,400 


5,981.92 


Thomas, George & Jane 


236,300 


2,315.74 


Thomas, Gordon & Alice 


246,200 


2,412.76 


Thompson, G Brooks & Arlene 


306,400 


3,002.72 


Thompson, Lawrence & Dorothy 


485,400 


4,756.92 


Thomson, Anne P. 


277,700 


2,721.46 


Thorne, Karen 0. 


318,000 


3,116.40 


Thornton, Peter & Ann 


16,900 


165.62 


Three S Realty Trust 


636,100 


6,233.78 


Thurow, Lester & Gretchen P 


873,400 


8,559.32 


Ticknor, H Malcolm 


342,000 


3,351.60 


Tinder, Glenn & Gloria 


470,500 


4,610.90 


Tingey, Ruth Ray 


444,300 


4,354.14 


Tingley, Frederick & Dilla 


331,900 


3,252.62 


Titus, William A. 


123,900 


1,214.22 


Tod, Jane N. 


235,000 


2,303.00 


Todd, Conrad 


779,400 


7,638.12 


Todd, Conrad & Harriet 


32,000 


313.60 


Todd, Eveleth R. 


273,000 


2 ,675.40 


Toksoz, M Nafi & Helena 


182,800 


1,791.44 


Toler, Louise C. 


262,500 


2,572.50 


Tomasic, Michael & Beverly 


661,100 


6,478.78 


Tong, Pin & Siang 


283,900 


2,782.22 


Torode, Herbert & Lorraine 


274,200 


2,687.16 


Torri, Myra M. 


378, 700 


3,711.26 


Torti, Maurice & Nancy 


543,800 


5,329.24 


Touborg, Margaret 


508,100 


4,979.38 


Tracey, Elizabeth M. 


570,100 


5,586.98 


Tracey, Robert & Caroline 


604,100 


5,920.18 


Tracey, Robert J. 


297,800 


2,918.44 


Travers, Paul & Bernice 


452,300 


4,432.54 


Travis, George & Lenore 


239,700 


2,349.06 


Trevelyan, Eoin & J Ann 


303,300 


2,972.34 


Troisi, Eugene A. 


346,300 


3,393.74 


Troisi, Ferdinand & Mary 


250,700 


2,456.86 


Tryder, Michael & Maureen 


305,800 


2,996.84 


Tucker, Janet L. 


131,200 


1,285.76 


Tunnell, Raymond & Suzanne 


391,900 


3,840.62 


Turano, Anthony & Florence 


90,000 


882.00 



235 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1988 



Aggregate Value 
Real Estate 



Real Estate 
Tax 



$ 363,000 
622,500 
164,500 
311,900 
180,800 
964,700 



$ 3,557.40 
6,100.50 
1,612.10 
3,056.62 
1,771.84 
9,454.06 



Turner, James & Mildred 
Turowski, Edmund J. & Josephine 
Tyler, Marion L. 
Tyler, Priscilla D. 
Tyler, Watson, Heirs of 
Tylko, John J. 



U S Dynamics Realty Trust 
Ulf elder, Thomas & Sue 
Ullman, Steven/ Amy & Gerald 
Umbrello, Francis & Virginia 
Uretsky, Joseph & Harriet 
Urner, Joseph F. 
Ury, William L. 



31,800 311.64 

545,500 5,345.90 

510,400 5,001.92 

344,200 3,373.16 

568,500 5,571.30 

362,400 3,551.52 

415,800 4,074.84 



Vagliano, Andre & Leslie 
Vale, Lawrence & Julia D. 
Valley Pond Corporation 
VanBuskirk, David & Elizabeth 
VanLeer, Hans 
VanLeer, Hans & Mary 
VanLeer, R. Karl & Rachel 
VanLeer, Rachel D. 
Vataha, Randel & Deborah 
Venier, Anthony & Catherine 
Vercollone, Edmund & Julia 
Verma, Dharmendra & Karen Sinclair 
Vet, Maria 

Vitale, Joseph & Christine 
Vockel, Virginia 
VonMertens, Ernest & Beatrice 
VonMertens, Peter & Page 



555,000 
461,000 
10,700 
459,000 
1,800 
448,300 
515,100 
144,500 
477,400 
752,500 
290,700 
342,800 
310,900 
316,900 
276,300 
180,700 
451,400 



5,439.00 
4,517.80 
104.86 
4,498.20 
17.64 
4,393.34 
5,047.98 
1,416.10 
4.673.52 
7,374.50 
2,848.86 
3,359.44 
3,046.82 
3,105.62 
2,707.74 
1,770.86 
4,423.72 



Wadsworth, Virginia 
Wales, Betty R. 
Wales, R Langdon & Ruth 
Wales, Roger & Patricia R. 
Walker, John & Joan 
Walker, Roger S. 
Walker, Sydney A. 
Wallroth, Donald & Eln 
Wallwork, Edwin & Janice 
Walsh, Patricia R. 
Walter, Charlton & Rosly 
Wang, An & Lorraine 
Wang, Chiu-Chen & Pauline 



422,600 
173,300 
422,500 
302,000 
440,100 
310,800 
518,600 
595,100 
311,600 
241,200 
482,500 
1,407,100 
512,800 



4,141.48 
1,698.34 
4,140.50 
2,959.60 
4,312.98 
3,045.84 
5,082.28 
5,831.98 
3,053.68 
2,363.76 
4,728.50 
13,789.58 
5,025.44 



236 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1988 

Aggregate Value Real Estate 







Keai estate 


Tax 


Wang, Frederick A. 




i 179 9nn 

$ X/j,jUU 


& 1 AQft 9A 


Wang, Thomas & Jacqueline 




ci q cnn 
J±y , jUU 


c no i in 
j,U?1.1U 


Warbler Springs Corp. 




i 19 9 nnn 
X , XZ J , uuu 


i i nns ao 

XX , UU D • HU 


Ward, Jane L. 




9^n QAfi 


9 A ft 9 
Z , *f JO • o Z 


Ward, Walter & Sophie 




9Aa t;nn 
Z^O , jUU 


9 /,1 e; 7 n 
Z ,4Xj . / u 


Ward Jr, Walter & Marie 




979 Ar\r\ 

Z / Z ,«tUU 


9 AAQ ^9 
Z , 00? . jZ 


Warner, Henrietta S. 




506 900 


4,967.62 


Warner, Patricia R. 




9A^ lOO 
Zt J , JUU 


9 An*} QA 
Z , 'tU J . 7*+ 


Warren, Duncan & Helen 




"57 "5 inn 

J / J , XUU 


9 A^A 9ft 
J , JO . JO 


Warren, Joan B. 




9fti aoo 
zox , ouu 


9 7 Aft 
Z , / J7, Do 


Watson, John & Gail V. 




A7A Ann 
'+/'+, ouu 


A A^l nft 

*t , O JX • Uo 


Waugh, John S. 




Ana nnn 
*fUo , uuu 


9 QQft An 
j , yyo .hU 


Webb, Robert & Sonia J. 




A.S6 800 

U , O UVJ 


4,476.64 


Webster, David & Winifred 




«n nnn 

J'+U ,UUU 


^ 9Q9 nn 
J , Z 7 z . uu 


Webster, Peter T. 




^Afi i nn 

jDO , XUU 


^A7 9ft 
J , JO/ .JO 


Weigel, Lynn & Irene 




S8d 600 


5 729.08 


Weisgall, Deborah/Wilder , Throope III 


Aflo Ann 

HO Z , ouu 


A 790 Aft 

*t , / /- J . "O 


Weisman, Rodger & Pamela 




qai Qnn 

-70X , 7UU 


Q A 9 A A9 
7 , H£0 • oz 


Welch, Nathaniel & Debra 




9^ Ann 

JJJ, ouu 


9 AftA ftft 
J , hOH • Oo 


Welch, Vernon & Leatrice 




9A9 ftnn 
zoz ,ouu 


9 "57^ AA 
Z , J / J • It 


Wengren, Margaret L. 




aaa 9nn 

ooo , JUU 


a S9Q 74 


Wengren et al, Richard 




aa nnn 
00 , uuu 


AAA ftn 

0*+0 • o U 


Wernicke, Brian & Joann S. 




^Oft 100 


9 niQ 9Q 
J , VJX J . JO 


Westcott, Vernon & Mary 




•JOfi fiOO 

JUU , U UVJ 


9 nnA aq 


Weston Rd Realty Trust 




227,500 


2,229.50 


Whalen, William & Mary 




99 S 200 

L. L. J y L. \J\J 


2 206 96 


Whatley, Robert & Kay 




9 si 100 


9 A Af) 7ft 

3,041.92 


Wheeler, Bella C. 




310,400 


Wheelock, Susan K. 




624 400 


6,119.12 


White, Elinor/Grossbart, Samuel 




3?A 800 


3 183.04 


White, James & Carol 




884 400 


8 667 12 


White, John & Gina 




S?q 9nn 


5 186 16 

J , iOU . 1U 


White, Katharine & John 




AQ7 70n 
Q7I , / <JU 


A Q97 A A 
O , O J / .HO 


White, Robert & Marion 




99A inn 

JZ.Hj 1UU 


3 176.18 


White, Thomas J. 




Ten onn 
/ jU , oUU 


7 9R7 ft A 
/ , Jj/ . 


Whiteside, Elinor I. 




245,300 


2,403.94 


Whitman, Lawrence & Joanne 




464,600 


4,553.08 


Whitman, Virginia R. 




695,600 


6,816.88 


Wiersema, Frederick 




357,200 


3,500.56 


Wiggin, Richard & Agnes 




495,200 


4,852.96 


Wilbor, Anne E. 




939,000 


9,202.20 


Wiley, David & Mary 




453,000 


4,439.40 


Wilfert, Fred & Eleanor 




268,000 


2,626.40 


Willemin, Julian & Jane 




256,600 


2,514.68 


Williams, Edwin & Ruth 




347,400 


3,404.52 


Williams, John & Anne 




317,300 


3,109.54 


Williams, Pamela M. 




490,900 


4,810.82 


Williams, William & Gertrude 




339,400 


3,326.12 


Willmann, Werner & Margaret 


237 


527,100 


5,165.58 







VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1988 



Aggregate Value 
Real Estate 



Real Estate 
Tax 



408,800 
233,900 
687,500 
178,100 
334,000 
435,300 
443,900 
395,200 
718,800 
262,700 
395,100 
278,300 
435,300 
281,200 
292,500 
336,100 
438,100 
320,200 
314,000 
345,400 
157,800 
343,500 
234,200 
302,300 
348,800 
386,000 
332,800 
394,900 



4,006.24 

2,292.22 

6,737.50 

1,745.38 

3,273.20 

4,265.94 

4,350.22 

3,872.96 

7,044.24 

2,574.46 

3,871.98 

2,727.34 

4,265.94 

2,755.76 

2,866.50 

3,293.78 

4,293.38 

3,137.96 

3,077.20 

3,384.92 

1,546.44 

3,366.30 

2,295.16 

2,962.54 

3,418.24 

3,782.80 

3,261.44 

3,870.02 



Wilson, Donald & Cheryl 

Wilson, Robert A. 

Winchell, Enid M. 

Winchell, Gordon D. 

Winchell, Gordon/Keevil, Charles 

Winchell, Guilbert & Amy 

Winchell, Richard & Martha 

Winship, Lee & Joyce 

Winship, Thomas & Elizabeth 

Wit her by, Marianne J. 

Wofford, John & Joan 

Wolf, Robert & Bryce 

Wolff, James & Carol 

Woll, Edward & Barbara 

Wong, Judith/Myers, Larry 

Woo, Robert & Lillian 

Woo, Way Dong & Emily 

Wood, George & Nancy 

Wood, Hilve V. 

Wood, Ronald & Wendy 

Wood, Virginia S. 

Woodington, W Gordon & Mary 

Woodworth, Coline/McKenna, John 

Woznac, Richard W. 

Wright, Malor, Stephen, & Maia 

Wu, Pei-Rin & Susan 

Wyatt, Peter & Janice 

Wyman, Michael & Kathleen 



Yagjian, Jacob & Inez 
Yamron, Joseph & Joan 
Yates, Nancy C. 
Yates, Richard & Daniel 
Yates, William & M Paige 
Yi , Cheng-Ying & Jen Hua 
Yore, George & Kathleen 
Yos, Jerrold & Ann 
Young, Anne 
Young, G Stewart 
Young, Lee & Jane 
Young, Robin & Laurie 
Yu, Sheng Hsiung & Chang 



25,400 248.92 

684,700 6,710.06 

237,100 2,323.58 

266,300 2,609.74 

173,300 1,698.34 

320,700 3,142.86 

173,900 1,704.22 

213,200 2,089.36 

638,900 6,261.22 

392,100 3,842.58 

444,100 4,352.18 

269,700 2,643.06 

532,100 5,214.58 



Zee, Molly B. 
Zimmerman, Herbert E. 
Zock, Robt. /Bennett, P. 
Zuelke, Laurence & Nancy 



599,300 5,873.14 

4,500 44.10 

448,800 4,398.24 

299,100 ' 2,931.18